Prenatal classes are really for men

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

The Miracle of Birth –Part I of Monty Python’s brilliant movie The Meaning of Life.

A mother in labour, pushed head first on a stretcher through hospital doors. Comic doctors debating who will put the tube in the baby’s head and who will do the episiotomy.

A clever jab at the amount of technology involved in the delivery room these days. I sure do hope we still use the machine that goes “ping”.

I’m learning all about the real story of birth these days through weekly participation in prenatal classes.

I initially cringed at the thought of sitting through hours of discussion, demonstration and multimedia regarding the journey of pregnancy and birth.

What could I possibly learn from prenatal classes that I didn’t already know? Breathe in, breathe out, breathe in, breathe out; followed by some yelling and screaming in the delivery room; then the big needle makes it all better; followed by proud papa handing out some cigars and taking all the credit for being calm, cool and composed. That’s pretty much it, right?

Over the past few weeks at prenatal class, I’ve realized that in reality, I didn’t know jack about the miracle of birth.

I’ve always held the female species in extremely high regard. Smarter, better looking, sophisticated, compassionate, so many great qualities men lack.

But after learning what woman go through to perpetuate our species, I’ve come to appreciate that they are in fact tougher, much tougher, than I’ve ever imagined.

Thankfully modern medicine has helped ease the pain of childbirth today. One hundred years ago, a bottle of scotch and a chomping towel would have been the only remedy available to alleviate the pain of giving birth.

Prior to the 20th century, maternal death levels were about one in 100. In the 1800s, maternal deaths occurred at a rate of approximately 40 per cent.

Today, mortality rates for child birth are less than one per cent in the developed world.

At a recent prenatal class, the two-hour focus was centred on the potential medical procedures and interventions that could happen on delivery day.

I now appreciate what an amazing experience labour will be for my wife, and how her body will change.

I’m still in awe that a baby can pass through such a small area, and how the female body naturally adapts during this process.

I am now educated on terms like analgesics, amniotic fluid, birthing balls, mastitis and vernix.

For the past few weeks, I’ve come to understand that prenatal classes aren’t really for women at all. From the moment the plus sign shows up on the pregnancy tester, women educate themselves about the road that lies ahead.

I think prenatal classes are really for men, to help us understand and appreciate what our partners must go through to bring offspring to this world. I have certainly had my eyes opened in prenatal class, and when I look at my wife in disbelief and wonderment at each new revelation, she just smiles, as if somehow amused at my new found appreciation.

We are certainly hoping for a natural birth, free from any complications. But it doesn’t hurt to be prepared for the decisions that could be made to ensure a healthy delivery for both baby and mom.

I have to admit, learning about potential medical procedures like episiotomy or cesarean section make me a little queasy, but certainly provide me with a better understanding of the sacrifices some women must make in the birthing process.

I’m learning so much, and continue to be amazed each week. But, can someone tell me where a guy can take some fainting classes.

Prenatal classes are really for men

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

The Miracle of Birth –Part I of Monty Python’s brilliant movie The Meaning of Life.

A mother in labour, pushed head first on a stretcher through hospital doors. Comic doctors debating who will put the tube in the baby’s head and who will do the episiotomy.

A clever jab at the amount of technology involved in the delivery room these days. I sure do hope we still use the machine that goes “ping”.

I’m learning all about the real story of birth these days through weekly participation in prenatal classes.

I initially cringed at the thought of sitting through hours of discussion, demonstration and multimedia regarding the journey of pregnancy and birth.

What could I possibly learn from prenatal classes that I didn’t already know? Breathe in, breathe out, breathe in, breathe out; followed by some yelling and screaming in the delivery room; then the big needle makes it all better; followed by proud papa handing out some cigars and taking all the credit for being calm, cool and composed. That’s pretty much it, right?

Over the past few weeks at prenatal class, I’ve realized that in reality, I didn’t know jack about the miracle of birth.

I’ve always held the female species in extremely high regard. Smarter, better looking, sophisticated, compassionate, so many great qualities men lack.

But after learning what woman go through to perpetuate our species, I’ve come to appreciate that they are in fact tougher, much tougher, than I’ve ever imagined.

Thankfully modern medicine has helped ease the pain of childbirth today. One hundred years ago, a bottle of scotch and a chomping towel would have been the only remedy available to alleviate the pain of giving birth.

Prior to the 20th century, maternal death levels were about one in 100. In the 1800s, maternal deaths occurred at a rate of approximately 40 per cent.

Today, mortality rates for child birth are less than one per cent in the developed world.

At a recent prenatal class, the two-hour focus was centred on the potential medical procedures and interventions that could happen on delivery day.

I now appreciate what an amazing experience labour will be for my wife, and how her body will change.

I’m still in awe that a baby can pass through such a small area, and how the female body naturally adapts during this process.

I am now educated on terms like analgesics, amniotic fluid, birthing balls, mastitis and vernix.

For the past few weeks, I’ve come to understand that prenatal classes aren’t really for women at all. From the moment the plus sign shows up on the pregnancy tester, women educate themselves about the road that lies ahead.

I think prenatal classes are really for men, to help us understand and appreciate what our partners must go through to bring offspring to this world. I have certainly had my eyes opened in prenatal class, and when I look at my wife in disbelief and wonderment at each new revelation, she just smiles, as if somehow amused at my new found appreciation.

We are certainly hoping for a natural birth, free from any complications. But it doesn’t hurt to be prepared for the decisions that could be made to ensure a healthy delivery for both baby and mom.

I have to admit, learning about potential medical procedures like episiotomy or cesarean section make me a little queasy, but certainly provide me with a better understanding of the sacrifices some women must make in the birthing process.

I’m learning so much, and continue to be amazed each week. But, can someone tell me where a guy can take some fainting classes.

Prenatal classes are really for men

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

The Miracle of Birth –Part I of Monty Python’s brilliant movie The Meaning of Life.

A mother in labour, pushed head first on a stretcher through hospital doors. Comic doctors debating who will put the tube in the baby’s head and who will do the episiotomy.

A clever jab at the amount of technology involved in the delivery room these days. I sure do hope we still use the machine that goes “ping”.

I’m learning all about the real story of birth these days through weekly participation in prenatal classes.

I initially cringed at the thought of sitting through hours of discussion, demonstration and multimedia regarding the journey of pregnancy and birth.

What could I possibly learn from prenatal classes that I didn’t already know? Breathe in, breathe out, breathe in, breathe out; followed by some yelling and screaming in the delivery room; then the big needle makes it all better; followed by proud papa handing out some cigars and taking all the credit for being calm, cool and composed. That’s pretty much it, right?

Over the past few weeks at prenatal class, I’ve realized that in reality, I didn’t know jack about the miracle of birth.

I’ve always held the female species in extremely high regard. Smarter, better looking, sophisticated, compassionate, so many great qualities men lack.

But after learning what woman go through to perpetuate our species, I’ve come to appreciate that they are in fact tougher, much tougher, than I’ve ever imagined.

Thankfully modern medicine has helped ease the pain of childbirth today. One hundred years ago, a bottle of scotch and a chomping towel would have been the only remedy available to alleviate the pain of giving birth.

Prior to the 20th century, maternal death levels were about one in 100. In the 1800s, maternal deaths occurred at a rate of approximately 40 per cent.

Today, mortality rates for child birth are less than one per cent in the developed world.

At a recent prenatal class, the two-hour focus was centred on the potential medical procedures and interventions that could happen on delivery day.

I now appreciate what an amazing experience labour will be for my wife, and how her body will change.

I’m still in awe that a baby can pass through such a small area, and how the female body naturally adapts during this process.

I am now educated on terms like analgesics, amniotic fluid, birthing balls, mastitis and vernix.

For the past few weeks, I’ve come to understand that prenatal classes aren’t really for women at all. From the moment the plus sign shows up on the pregnancy tester, women educate themselves about the road that lies ahead.

I think prenatal classes are really for men, to help us understand and appreciate what our partners must go through to bring offspring to this world. I have certainly had my eyes opened in prenatal class, and when I look at my wife in disbelief and wonderment at each new revelation, she just smiles, as if somehow amused at my new found appreciation.

We are certainly hoping for a natural birth, free from any complications. But it doesn’t hurt to be prepared for the decisions that could be made to ensure a healthy delivery for both baby and mom.

I have to admit, learning about potential medical procedures like episiotomy or cesarean section make me a little queasy, but certainly provide me with a better understanding of the sacrifices some women must make in the birthing process.

I’m learning so much, and continue to be amazed each week. But, can someone tell me where a guy can take some fainting classes.