Tim Hortons launches appeal on November 30

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

Tim Hortons will officially launch its appeal on Nov. 30 against Ministry of the Environment air emission restrictions imposed on the company’s new coffee roasting facility at 1290 Cormorant Rd. in the Ancaster Business Park.

Evangeline Berlie, case manager for the province’s Environmental Review Tribunal, said the Nov. 30 preliminary hearing is open to the public.

“To participate as a presenter, you have to make a written request for status,” Ms. Berlie said.

The preliminary hearing will be held at the Stoney Creek Municipal Centre, 777 Highway 8, beginning at 10 a. m.

Ms. Berlie said the Nov. 30 hearing will determine the scope of the appeal and the speakers who will participate.

No evidence is presented during the preliminary hearing. The first full hearing is typically held 30 days after the preliminary hearing.

It’s not clear how the appeal will impact the scheduled opening of the new $30 million, 74,000 square-foot facility.

Tim Hortons spokesperson David Morelli has declined to comment on the pending appeal.

When plans for the new facility were first announced earlier this spring, the company said it hoped the facility would be operational by the fourth quarter of this year.

But given the timelines of the appeal, it appears unlikely the company will open the facility before January, 2010.

Fruition Manufacturing Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Tim Hortons operator TDL Group Corp., is launching the appeal against the environment ministry.

Fruition calls the certificate of approval conditions “onerous considering that the facility is located in an established industrial park and is using the latest technology to deal with stack emissions from coffee roasters.”

Fruition is also appealing a condition to notify the environment ministry’s district manager within two days of an environmental complaint, arguing the requirement is an unnecessary, duplicative administrative burden. The appeal disputes the ministry’s prescribed odour limits and the broad definition of “sensitive receptors,” which could include neighbouring homes, day-care facilities, schools, parks, commercial plazas or office buildings.

Meanwhile, Ancaster Councillor Lloyd Ferguson said his office has received no concerns regarding odor emissions from the Tim Hortons plant. The city of Hamilton is not taking a position on the company’s appeal, Mr. Ferguson said.

When fully operational, the coffee roasting facility is expected to supply Tim Hortons stores across Canada. The plant will include three drum coffee roasting machines each with a capacity to roast up to 3,000 kilograms of green coffee per hour. Emissions will be controlled using three catalytic oxidizers, also known as after-burners. Production will run in two eight-hour shifts daily, employing about 50 people.

Updates on the appeal process can be found online at ert.gov.on.ca by searching on Case number 09-064.

Tim Hortons launches appeal on November 30

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

Tim Hortons will officially launch its appeal on Nov. 30 against Ministry of the Environment air emission restrictions imposed on the company’s new coffee roasting facility at 1290 Cormorant Rd. in the Ancaster Business Park.

Evangeline Berlie, case manager for the province’s Environmental Review Tribunal, said the Nov. 30 preliminary hearing is open to the public.

“To participate as a presenter, you have to make a written request for status,” Ms. Berlie said.

The preliminary hearing will be held at the Stoney Creek Municipal Centre, 777 Highway 8, beginning at 10 a. m.

Ms. Berlie said the Nov. 30 hearing will determine the scope of the appeal and the speakers who will participate.

No evidence is presented during the preliminary hearing. The first full hearing is typically held 30 days after the preliminary hearing.

It’s not clear how the appeal will impact the scheduled opening of the new $30 million, 74,000 square-foot facility.

Tim Hortons spokesperson David Morelli has declined to comment on the pending appeal.

When plans for the new facility were first announced earlier this spring, the company said it hoped the facility would be operational by the fourth quarter of this year.

But given the timelines of the appeal, it appears unlikely the company will open the facility before January, 2010.

Fruition Manufacturing Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Tim Hortons operator TDL Group Corp., is launching the appeal against the environment ministry.

Fruition calls the certificate of approval conditions “onerous considering that the facility is located in an established industrial park and is using the latest technology to deal with stack emissions from coffee roasters.”

Fruition is also appealing a condition to notify the environment ministry’s district manager within two days of an environmental complaint, arguing the requirement is an unnecessary, duplicative administrative burden. The appeal disputes the ministry’s prescribed odour limits and the broad definition of “sensitive receptors,” which could include neighbouring homes, day-care facilities, schools, parks, commercial plazas or office buildings.

Meanwhile, Ancaster Councillor Lloyd Ferguson said his office has received no concerns regarding odor emissions from the Tim Hortons plant. The city of Hamilton is not taking a position on the company’s appeal, Mr. Ferguson said.

When fully operational, the coffee roasting facility is expected to supply Tim Hortons stores across Canada. The plant will include three drum coffee roasting machines each with a capacity to roast up to 3,000 kilograms of green coffee per hour. Emissions will be controlled using three catalytic oxidizers, also known as after-burners. Production will run in two eight-hour shifts daily, employing about 50 people.

Updates on the appeal process can be found online at ert.gov.on.ca by searching on Case number 09-064.

Tim Hortons launches appeal on November 30

News Oct 23, 2009 Ancaster News

Tim Hortons will officially launch its appeal on Nov. 30 against Ministry of the Environment air emission restrictions imposed on the company’s new coffee roasting facility at 1290 Cormorant Rd. in the Ancaster Business Park.

Evangeline Berlie, case manager for the province’s Environmental Review Tribunal, said the Nov. 30 preliminary hearing is open to the public.

“To participate as a presenter, you have to make a written request for status,” Ms. Berlie said.

The preliminary hearing will be held at the Stoney Creek Municipal Centre, 777 Highway 8, beginning at 10 a. m.

Ms. Berlie said the Nov. 30 hearing will determine the scope of the appeal and the speakers who will participate.

No evidence is presented during the preliminary hearing. The first full hearing is typically held 30 days after the preliminary hearing.

It’s not clear how the appeal will impact the scheduled opening of the new $30 million, 74,000 square-foot facility.

Tim Hortons spokesperson David Morelli has declined to comment on the pending appeal.

When plans for the new facility were first announced earlier this spring, the company said it hoped the facility would be operational by the fourth quarter of this year.

But given the timelines of the appeal, it appears unlikely the company will open the facility before January, 2010.

Fruition Manufacturing Limited, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Tim Hortons operator TDL Group Corp., is launching the appeal against the environment ministry.

Fruition calls the certificate of approval conditions “onerous considering that the facility is located in an established industrial park and is using the latest technology to deal with stack emissions from coffee roasters.”

Fruition is also appealing a condition to notify the environment ministry’s district manager within two days of an environmental complaint, arguing the requirement is an unnecessary, duplicative administrative burden. The appeal disputes the ministry’s prescribed odour limits and the broad definition of “sensitive receptors,” which could include neighbouring homes, day-care facilities, schools, parks, commercial plazas or office buildings.

Meanwhile, Ancaster Councillor Lloyd Ferguson said his office has received no concerns regarding odor emissions from the Tim Hortons plant. The city of Hamilton is not taking a position on the company’s appeal, Mr. Ferguson said.

When fully operational, the coffee roasting facility is expected to supply Tim Hortons stores across Canada. The plant will include three drum coffee roasting machines each with a capacity to roast up to 3,000 kilograms of green coffee per hour. Emissions will be controlled using three catalytic oxidizers, also known as after-burners. Production will run in two eight-hour shifts daily, employing about 50 people.

Updates on the appeal process can be found online at ert.gov.on.ca by searching on Case number 09-064.