Outcome’ of policing more important than numbers, new Hamilton mayor Bratina says

News Dec 08, 2010 Ancaster News

Mayor Bob Bratina says he’ll be less focused on increasing the number of police officers on the Hamilton streets in his coming term than on their success in cutting crime and “public disorder.” His predecessor, Fred Eisenberger, promised to add 100 cops during his term – a target he missed – but the new mayor said he isn’t bringing a specific agenda as he joins the Hamilton police services board.

“It’s the outcome that you want,” Bratina said, praising Police Chief Glenn De Caire for the success of efforts to crack down on criminal and disruptive behaviour in the downtown core, including “ground zero” outside the main entrance to Jackson Square.

“I was frankly embarrassed at times by the unruliness and the loitering and the people yelling at each other. I don’t see that – I won’t say ever at all – but I would say it’s a 90 per cent improvement,” he said.

“I know that (the chief) gets it. As a new member of the board, I’ll be more supportive and in a learning curve, as opposed to bringing my particular agenda.” The mayor offered his assessment following a press conference hailing the progress of a special unit of 40 mostly foot and bike patrol officers primarily dedicated to the downtown core, but that is also deployed for Ticat games and festivals across the city.

Between its May 7 launch and the end of November, the ACTION unit officers made 657 arrests, laid 960 charges, seized more than $400,000 in illegal street drugs and issued 3,250 offence tickets, according to police.

Muggings were cut by more than a fifth and the 37 life-threatening calls during the five-month startup were the lowest in the past four years for the same period.

De Caire told the press conference he found “most disturbing” the re-arrest of 259 people who failed to comply with court-ordered restrictions or probation conditions.

He said he expects increased enforcement and encouragement of public reporting of criminal activity to see the crime rate rise.

“Normally that’s not what you want to hear from the chief of police, but that’s the return that we are going to get on our investment,” he said.

“The community safety is the dividend of that investment, so I am OK if the crime rate goes through the roof. That means that the safety rate is also on the same rapid rise.” Mountain Liberal MPP Sophia Aggelonitis said her government has committed more than $1 million to the city as part of a provincial anti-violence strategy, praising the entire Hamilton Police Service for the crackdown’s success.

“It is a joint effort and we really appreciate it on behalf Mayor Bob Bratina says he’ll be less focused on increasing the number of police officers on the Hamilton streets in his coming term than on their success in cutting crime and “public disorder.” His predecessor, Fred Eisenberger, promised to add 100 cops during his term – a target he missed – but the new mayor said he isn’t bringing a specific agenda as he joins the Hamilton police services board.

“It’s the outcome that you want,” Bratina said, praising Police Chief Glenn De Caire for the success of efforts to crack down on criminal and disruptive behaviour in the downtown core, including “ground zero” outside the main entrance to Jackson Square.

“I was frankly embarrassed at times by the unruliness and the loitering and the people yelling at each other. I don’t see that – I won’t say ever at all – but I would say it’s a 90 per cent improvement,” he said.

“I know that (the chief) gets it. As a new member of the board, I’ll be more supportive and in a learning curve, as opposed to bringing my particular agenda.” The mayor offered his assessment following a press conference hailing the progress of a special unit of 40 mostly foot and bike patrol officers primarily dedicated to the downtown core, but that is also deployed for Ticat games and festivals across the city.

Between its May 7 launch and the end of November, the ACTION unit officers made 657 arrests, laid 960 charges, seized more than $400,000 in illegal street drugs and issued 3,250 offence tickets, according to police.

Muggings were cut by more than a fifth and the 37 life-threatening calls during the five-month startup were the lowest in the past four years for the same period.

De Caire told the press conference he found “most disturbing” the re-arrest of 259 people who failed to comply with court-ordered restrictions or probation conditions.

He said he expects increased enforcement and encouragement of public reporting of criminal activity to see the crime rate rise.

“Normally that’s not what you want to hear from the chief of police, but that’s the return that we are going to get on our investment,” he said.

“The community safety is the dividend of that investment, so I am OK if the crime rate goes through the roof. That means that the safety rate is also on the same rapid rise.” Mountain Liberal MPP Sophia Aggelonitis said her government has committed more than $1 million to the city as part of a provincial anti-violence strategy, praising the entire Hamilton Police Service for the crackdown’s success.

“It is a joint effort and we really appreciate it on behalfMayor Bob Bratina says he’ll be less focused on increasing the number of police officers on the Hamilton streets in his coming term than on their success in cutting crime and “public disorder.” His predecessor, Fred Eisenberger, promised to add 100 cops during his term – a target he missed – but the new mayor said he isn’t bringing a specific agenda as he joins the Hamilton police services board.

“It’s the outcome that you want,” Bratina said, praising Police Chief Glenn De Caire for the success of efforts to crack down on criminal and disruptive behaviour in the downtown core, including “ground zero” outside the main entrance to Jackson Square.

“I was frankly embarrassed at times by the unruliness and the loitering and the people yelling at each other. I don’t see that – I won’t say ever at all – but I would say it’s a 90 per cent improvement,” he said.

“I know that (the chief) gets it. As a new member of the board, I’ll be more supportive and in a learning curve, as opposed to bringing my particular agenda.” The mayor offered his assessment following a press conference hailing the progress of a special unit of 40 mostly foot and bike patrol officers primarily dedicated to the downtown core, but that is also deployed for Ticat games and festivals across the city.

Between its May 7 launch and the end of November, the ACTION unit officers made 657 arrests, laid 960 charges, seized more than $400,000 in illegal street drugs and issued 3,250 offence tickets, according to police.

Muggings were cut by more than a fifth and the 37 life-threatening calls during the five-month startup were the lowest in the past four years for the same period.

De Caire told the press conference he found “most disturbing” the re-arrest of 259 people who failed to comply with court-ordered restrictions or probation conditions.

He said he expects increased enforcement and encouragement of public reporting of criminal activity to see the crime rate rise.

“Normally that’s not what you want to hear from the chief of police, but that’s the return that we are going to get on our investment,” he said.

“The community safety is the dividend of that investment, so I am OK if the crime rate goes through the roof. That means that the safety rate is also on the same rapid rise.” Mountain Liberal MPP Sophia Aggelonitis said her government has committed more than $1 million to the city as part of a provincial anti-violence strategy, praising the entire Hamilton Police Service for the crackdown’s success.

“It is a joint effort and we really appreciate it on behalf of the citizens of this city,” she said.

Outcome’ of policing more important than numbers, new Hamilton mayor Bratina says

News Dec 08, 2010 Ancaster News

Mayor Bob Bratina says he’ll be less focused on increasing the number of police officers on the Hamilton streets in his coming term than on their success in cutting crime and “public disorder.” His predecessor, Fred Eisenberger, promised to add 100 cops during his term – a target he missed – but the new mayor said he isn’t bringing a specific agenda as he joins the Hamilton police services board.

“It’s the outcome that you want,” Bratina said, praising Police Chief Glenn De Caire for the success of efforts to crack down on criminal and disruptive behaviour in the downtown core, including “ground zero” outside the main entrance to Jackson Square.

“I was frankly embarrassed at times by the unruliness and the loitering and the people yelling at each other. I don’t see that – I won’t say ever at all – but I would say it’s a 90 per cent improvement,” he said.

“I know that (the chief) gets it. As a new member of the board, I’ll be more supportive and in a learning curve, as opposed to bringing my particular agenda.” The mayor offered his assessment following a press conference hailing the progress of a special unit of 40 mostly foot and bike patrol officers primarily dedicated to the downtown core, but that is also deployed for Ticat games and festivals across the city.

Between its May 7 launch and the end of November, the ACTION unit officers made 657 arrests, laid 960 charges, seized more than $400,000 in illegal street drugs and issued 3,250 offence tickets, according to police.

Muggings were cut by more than a fifth and the 37 life-threatening calls during the five-month startup were the lowest in the past four years for the same period.

De Caire told the press conference he found “most disturbing” the re-arrest of 259 people who failed to comply with court-ordered restrictions or probation conditions.

He said he expects increased enforcement and encouragement of public reporting of criminal activity to see the crime rate rise.

“Normally that’s not what you want to hear from the chief of police, but that’s the return that we are going to get on our investment,” he said.

“The community safety is the dividend of that investment, so I am OK if the crime rate goes through the roof. That means that the safety rate is also on the same rapid rise.” Mountain Liberal MPP Sophia Aggelonitis said her government has committed more than $1 million to the city as part of a provincial anti-violence strategy, praising the entire Hamilton Police Service for the crackdown’s success.

“It is a joint effort and we really appreciate it on behalf Mayor Bob Bratina says he’ll be less focused on increasing the number of police officers on the Hamilton streets in his coming term than on their success in cutting crime and “public disorder.” His predecessor, Fred Eisenberger, promised to add 100 cops during his term – a target he missed – but the new mayor said he isn’t bringing a specific agenda as he joins the Hamilton police services board.

“It’s the outcome that you want,” Bratina said, praising Police Chief Glenn De Caire for the success of efforts to crack down on criminal and disruptive behaviour in the downtown core, including “ground zero” outside the main entrance to Jackson Square.

“I was frankly embarrassed at times by the unruliness and the loitering and the people yelling at each other. I don’t see that – I won’t say ever at all – but I would say it’s a 90 per cent improvement,” he said.

“I know that (the chief) gets it. As a new member of the board, I’ll be more supportive and in a learning curve, as opposed to bringing my particular agenda.” The mayor offered his assessment following a press conference hailing the progress of a special unit of 40 mostly foot and bike patrol officers primarily dedicated to the downtown core, but that is also deployed for Ticat games and festivals across the city.

Between its May 7 launch and the end of November, the ACTION unit officers made 657 arrests, laid 960 charges, seized more than $400,000 in illegal street drugs and issued 3,250 offence tickets, according to police.

Muggings were cut by more than a fifth and the 37 life-threatening calls during the five-month startup were the lowest in the past four years for the same period.

De Caire told the press conference he found “most disturbing” the re-arrest of 259 people who failed to comply with court-ordered restrictions or probation conditions.

He said he expects increased enforcement and encouragement of public reporting of criminal activity to see the crime rate rise.

“Normally that’s not what you want to hear from the chief of police, but that’s the return that we are going to get on our investment,” he said.

“The community safety is the dividend of that investment, so I am OK if the crime rate goes through the roof. That means that the safety rate is also on the same rapid rise.” Mountain Liberal MPP Sophia Aggelonitis said her government has committed more than $1 million to the city as part of a provincial anti-violence strategy, praising the entire Hamilton Police Service for the crackdown’s success.

“It is a joint effort and we really appreciate it on behalfMayor Bob Bratina says he’ll be less focused on increasing the number of police officers on the Hamilton streets in his coming term than on their success in cutting crime and “public disorder.” His predecessor, Fred Eisenberger, promised to add 100 cops during his term – a target he missed – but the new mayor said he isn’t bringing a specific agenda as he joins the Hamilton police services board.

“It’s the outcome that you want,” Bratina said, praising Police Chief Glenn De Caire for the success of efforts to crack down on criminal and disruptive behaviour in the downtown core, including “ground zero” outside the main entrance to Jackson Square.

“I was frankly embarrassed at times by the unruliness and the loitering and the people yelling at each other. I don’t see that – I won’t say ever at all – but I would say it’s a 90 per cent improvement,” he said.

“I know that (the chief) gets it. As a new member of the board, I’ll be more supportive and in a learning curve, as opposed to bringing my particular agenda.” The mayor offered his assessment following a press conference hailing the progress of a special unit of 40 mostly foot and bike patrol officers primarily dedicated to the downtown core, but that is also deployed for Ticat games and festivals across the city.

Between its May 7 launch and the end of November, the ACTION unit officers made 657 arrests, laid 960 charges, seized more than $400,000 in illegal street drugs and issued 3,250 offence tickets, according to police.

Muggings were cut by more than a fifth and the 37 life-threatening calls during the five-month startup were the lowest in the past four years for the same period.

De Caire told the press conference he found “most disturbing” the re-arrest of 259 people who failed to comply with court-ordered restrictions or probation conditions.

He said he expects increased enforcement and encouragement of public reporting of criminal activity to see the crime rate rise.

“Normally that’s not what you want to hear from the chief of police, but that’s the return that we are going to get on our investment,” he said.

“The community safety is the dividend of that investment, so I am OK if the crime rate goes through the roof. That means that the safety rate is also on the same rapid rise.” Mountain Liberal MPP Sophia Aggelonitis said her government has committed more than $1 million to the city as part of a provincial anti-violence strategy, praising the entire Hamilton Police Service for the crackdown’s success.

“It is a joint effort and we really appreciate it on behalf of the citizens of this city,” she said.

Outcome’ of policing more important than numbers, new Hamilton mayor Bratina says

News Dec 08, 2010 Ancaster News

Mayor Bob Bratina says he’ll be less focused on increasing the number of police officers on the Hamilton streets in his coming term than on their success in cutting crime and “public disorder.” His predecessor, Fred Eisenberger, promised to add 100 cops during his term – a target he missed – but the new mayor said he isn’t bringing a specific agenda as he joins the Hamilton police services board.

“It’s the outcome that you want,” Bratina said, praising Police Chief Glenn De Caire for the success of efforts to crack down on criminal and disruptive behaviour in the downtown core, including “ground zero” outside the main entrance to Jackson Square.

“I was frankly embarrassed at times by the unruliness and the loitering and the people yelling at each other. I don’t see that – I won’t say ever at all – but I would say it’s a 90 per cent improvement,” he said.

“I know that (the chief) gets it. As a new member of the board, I’ll be more supportive and in a learning curve, as opposed to bringing my particular agenda.” The mayor offered his assessment following a press conference hailing the progress of a special unit of 40 mostly foot and bike patrol officers primarily dedicated to the downtown core, but that is also deployed for Ticat games and festivals across the city.

Between its May 7 launch and the end of November, the ACTION unit officers made 657 arrests, laid 960 charges, seized more than $400,000 in illegal street drugs and issued 3,250 offence tickets, according to police.

Muggings were cut by more than a fifth and the 37 life-threatening calls during the five-month startup were the lowest in the past four years for the same period.

De Caire told the press conference he found “most disturbing” the re-arrest of 259 people who failed to comply with court-ordered restrictions or probation conditions.

He said he expects increased enforcement and encouragement of public reporting of criminal activity to see the crime rate rise.

“Normally that’s not what you want to hear from the chief of police, but that’s the return that we are going to get on our investment,” he said.

“The community safety is the dividend of that investment, so I am OK if the crime rate goes through the roof. That means that the safety rate is also on the same rapid rise.” Mountain Liberal MPP Sophia Aggelonitis said her government has committed more than $1 million to the city as part of a provincial anti-violence strategy, praising the entire Hamilton Police Service for the crackdown’s success.

“It is a joint effort and we really appreciate it on behalf Mayor Bob Bratina says he’ll be less focused on increasing the number of police officers on the Hamilton streets in his coming term than on their success in cutting crime and “public disorder.” His predecessor, Fred Eisenberger, promised to add 100 cops during his term – a target he missed – but the new mayor said he isn’t bringing a specific agenda as he joins the Hamilton police services board.

“It’s the outcome that you want,” Bratina said, praising Police Chief Glenn De Caire for the success of efforts to crack down on criminal and disruptive behaviour in the downtown core, including “ground zero” outside the main entrance to Jackson Square.

“I was frankly embarrassed at times by the unruliness and the loitering and the people yelling at each other. I don’t see that – I won’t say ever at all – but I would say it’s a 90 per cent improvement,” he said.

“I know that (the chief) gets it. As a new member of the board, I’ll be more supportive and in a learning curve, as opposed to bringing my particular agenda.” The mayor offered his assessment following a press conference hailing the progress of a special unit of 40 mostly foot and bike patrol officers primarily dedicated to the downtown core, but that is also deployed for Ticat games and festivals across the city.

Between its May 7 launch and the end of November, the ACTION unit officers made 657 arrests, laid 960 charges, seized more than $400,000 in illegal street drugs and issued 3,250 offence tickets, according to police.

Muggings were cut by more than a fifth and the 37 life-threatening calls during the five-month startup were the lowest in the past four years for the same period.

De Caire told the press conference he found “most disturbing” the re-arrest of 259 people who failed to comply with court-ordered restrictions or probation conditions.

He said he expects increased enforcement and encouragement of public reporting of criminal activity to see the crime rate rise.

“Normally that’s not what you want to hear from the chief of police, but that’s the return that we are going to get on our investment,” he said.

“The community safety is the dividend of that investment, so I am OK if the crime rate goes through the roof. That means that the safety rate is also on the same rapid rise.” Mountain Liberal MPP Sophia Aggelonitis said her government has committed more than $1 million to the city as part of a provincial anti-violence strategy, praising the entire Hamilton Police Service for the crackdown’s success.

“It is a joint effort and we really appreciate it on behalfMayor Bob Bratina says he’ll be less focused on increasing the number of police officers on the Hamilton streets in his coming term than on their success in cutting crime and “public disorder.” His predecessor, Fred Eisenberger, promised to add 100 cops during his term – a target he missed – but the new mayor said he isn’t bringing a specific agenda as he joins the Hamilton police services board.

“It’s the outcome that you want,” Bratina said, praising Police Chief Glenn De Caire for the success of efforts to crack down on criminal and disruptive behaviour in the downtown core, including “ground zero” outside the main entrance to Jackson Square.

“I was frankly embarrassed at times by the unruliness and the loitering and the people yelling at each other. I don’t see that – I won’t say ever at all – but I would say it’s a 90 per cent improvement,” he said.

“I know that (the chief) gets it. As a new member of the board, I’ll be more supportive and in a learning curve, as opposed to bringing my particular agenda.” The mayor offered his assessment following a press conference hailing the progress of a special unit of 40 mostly foot and bike patrol officers primarily dedicated to the downtown core, but that is also deployed for Ticat games and festivals across the city.

Between its May 7 launch and the end of November, the ACTION unit officers made 657 arrests, laid 960 charges, seized more than $400,000 in illegal street drugs and issued 3,250 offence tickets, according to police.

Muggings were cut by more than a fifth and the 37 life-threatening calls during the five-month startup were the lowest in the past four years for the same period.

De Caire told the press conference he found “most disturbing” the re-arrest of 259 people who failed to comply with court-ordered restrictions or probation conditions.

He said he expects increased enforcement and encouragement of public reporting of criminal activity to see the crime rate rise.

“Normally that’s not what you want to hear from the chief of police, but that’s the return that we are going to get on our investment,” he said.

“The community safety is the dividend of that investment, so I am OK if the crime rate goes through the roof. That means that the safety rate is also on the same rapid rise.” Mountain Liberal MPP Sophia Aggelonitis said her government has committed more than $1 million to the city as part of a provincial anti-violence strategy, praising the entire Hamilton Police Service for the crackdown’s success.

“It is a joint effort and we really appreciate it on behalf of the citizens of this city,” she said.