$78 million boost for Second Career program

News Oct 15, 2009 Ancaster News

 

Kit Loo and Andrew Cuvaj are hoping to find new careers

overseeing the building of roads and bridges.

The first year civil engineering students, who saw their previous

jobs vanish within the past year, are among the 650 people enrolled in the

Second Career program at Mohawk College.

“The workload is a little bit heavy because I’ve been out of

school for 10 years,” said Mr. Loo, 34, who would like to get a job with a

municipality’s engineering department when he graduates in 2011.

“I know civil engineers are in high demand right now,” said

the Hamilton resident. “I’m very optimistic I’ll find something.”

A married father of two little boys, Mr. Cuvaj, 33, would

like to get a job in project management in a couple of years.

“My family depends on it,” the

Burlington resident said.

The two men were among a group of

students who discussed the art of asphalt making

and other matters with Premier

Dalton McGuinty who visited the Fennell campus on Tuesday to announce the

province would be injecting another $78 million into Second Career.

“It has exceeded our expectations,”

said Mr. McGuinty, who noted nearly 21,000 people have enrolled in the program

since it began.

The Premier said the Ministry of

Training, Colleges and Universities will look at ways of funding Second Career

over the long-term and new guidelines are expected in place by January.

The province set up Second Career in

June 2008 to help laid off workers in Ontario find new careers in a variety of

areas such as nursing, engineering technology, information technology, policing

and community and social services.

$78 million boost for Second Career program

News Oct 15, 2009 Ancaster News

 

Kit Loo and Andrew Cuvaj are hoping to find new careers

overseeing the building of roads and bridges.

The first year civil engineering students, who saw their previous

jobs vanish within the past year, are among the 650 people enrolled in the

Second Career program at Mohawk College.

“The workload is a little bit heavy because I’ve been out of

school for 10 years,” said Mr. Loo, 34, who would like to get a job with a

municipality’s engineering department when he graduates in 2011.

“I know civil engineers are in high demand right now,” said

the Hamilton resident. “I’m very optimistic I’ll find something.”

A married father of two little boys, Mr. Cuvaj, 33, would

like to get a job in project management in a couple of years.

“My family depends on it,” the

Burlington resident said.

The two men were among a group of

students who discussed the art of asphalt making

and other matters with Premier

Dalton McGuinty who visited the Fennell campus on Tuesday to announce the

province would be injecting another $78 million into Second Career.

“It has exceeded our expectations,”

said Mr. McGuinty, who noted nearly 21,000 people have enrolled in the program

since it began.

The Premier said the Ministry of

Training, Colleges and Universities will look at ways of funding Second Career

over the long-term and new guidelines are expected in place by January.

The province set up Second Career in

June 2008 to help laid off workers in Ontario find new careers in a variety of

areas such as nursing, engineering technology, information technology, policing

and community and social services.

$78 million boost for Second Career program

News Oct 15, 2009 Ancaster News

 

Kit Loo and Andrew Cuvaj are hoping to find new careers

overseeing the building of roads and bridges.

The first year civil engineering students, who saw their previous

jobs vanish within the past year, are among the 650 people enrolled in the

Second Career program at Mohawk College.

“The workload is a little bit heavy because I’ve been out of

school for 10 years,” said Mr. Loo, 34, who would like to get a job with a

municipality’s engineering department when he graduates in 2011.

“I know civil engineers are in high demand right now,” said

the Hamilton resident. “I’m very optimistic I’ll find something.”

A married father of two little boys, Mr. Cuvaj, 33, would

like to get a job in project management in a couple of years.

“My family depends on it,” the

Burlington resident said.

The two men were among a group of

students who discussed the art of asphalt making

and other matters with Premier

Dalton McGuinty who visited the Fennell campus on Tuesday to announce the

province would be injecting another $78 million into Second Career.

“It has exceeded our expectations,”

said Mr. McGuinty, who noted nearly 21,000 people have enrolled in the program

since it began.

The Premier said the Ministry of

Training, Colleges and Universities will look at ways of funding Second Career

over the long-term and new guidelines are expected in place by January.

The province set up Second Career in

June 2008 to help laid off workers in Ontario find new careers in a variety of

areas such as nursing, engineering technology, information technology, policing

and community and social services.