First-term mayor eyes helm of City of Hamilton for another four years

News Oct 15, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger said he will seek a second term of office in next year’s municipal election.

The first term mayor, who upset the heavily favoured Larry Di Ianni in the 2006 municipal election, said he is proposing a wider agenda to continue what he describes as the city’s “momentum” of success.

“Most of the things I laid out in the election platform last time are either done or in the process, so sure I would like to see a lot of it completed,” said Mr. Eisenberger in an interview.

“But I have a lot of other things in the queue, big issues like light-rail transit, and the 2015 Pan Am (games announcement).”

The city did lose out on landing an NHL hockey franchise when an Arizona bankruptcy judge denied Canadian billionaire Jim Balsillie an opportunity to purchase the Arizona Coyotes. But Mr. Eisenberger is looking at a number of other city-changing projects, including being part of the Golden Horseshoe that would host the Pan Am Games and Metrolinx funding for the city’s light-rail transit project. Both announcements are expected over the next two months.

The mayor said he will be talking about the future of Hamilton in the campaign.

“We certainly would like to look down the road and say what is the future of the city and certainly that’s what we will be talking about.”

Mr. Eisenberger said he has not decided when he will make a formal announcement. Municipal candidates can begin registering to run in the November election after Jan. 1, 2010. Once a candidate is registered, the person can start raising money.

“I haven’t contemplated an announcement but I am delighted to be doing the work,” he said.

Mr. Eisenberger ran on a modest but reformist agenda that included establishing an integrity commissioner and an ombudsman in an attempt to “clean up” city hall. He also proposed bolstering funding to the economic development department, which council did in 2008 to the tune of $1.5 million, and adding more officers to the city’s police service. He was also associated with improving Hamilton’s environmental record, which included adding more bike lanes to city streets and making the city more pedestrian- friendly. Mr. Eisenberger has overseen a number of projects that began prior to him assuming office, including renovating city hall, relocating the downtown bus station to Hunter Street, refurbishing the downtown farmers market and Central Library, and renovating the Lister Block.

First-term mayor eyes helm of City of Hamilton for another four years

News Oct 15, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger said he will seek a second term of office in next year’s municipal election.

The first term mayor, who upset the heavily favoured Larry Di Ianni in the 2006 municipal election, said he is proposing a wider agenda to continue what he describes as the city’s “momentum” of success.

“Most of the things I laid out in the election platform last time are either done or in the process, so sure I would like to see a lot of it completed,” said Mr. Eisenberger in an interview.

“But I have a lot of other things in the queue, big issues like light-rail transit, and the 2015 Pan Am (games announcement).”

The city did lose out on landing an NHL hockey franchise when an Arizona bankruptcy judge denied Canadian billionaire Jim Balsillie an opportunity to purchase the Arizona Coyotes. But Mr. Eisenberger is looking at a number of other city-changing projects, including being part of the Golden Horseshoe that would host the Pan Am Games and Metrolinx funding for the city’s light-rail transit project. Both announcements are expected over the next two months.

The mayor said he will be talking about the future of Hamilton in the campaign.

“We certainly would like to look down the road and say what is the future of the city and certainly that’s what we will be talking about.”

Mr. Eisenberger said he has not decided when he will make a formal announcement. Municipal candidates can begin registering to run in the November election after Jan. 1, 2010. Once a candidate is registered, the person can start raising money.

“I haven’t contemplated an announcement but I am delighted to be doing the work,” he said.

Mr. Eisenberger ran on a modest but reformist agenda that included establishing an integrity commissioner and an ombudsman in an attempt to “clean up” city hall. He also proposed bolstering funding to the economic development department, which council did in 2008 to the tune of $1.5 million, and adding more officers to the city’s police service. He was also associated with improving Hamilton’s environmental record, which included adding more bike lanes to city streets and making the city more pedestrian- friendly. Mr. Eisenberger has overseen a number of projects that began prior to him assuming office, including renovating city hall, relocating the downtown bus station to Hunter Street, refurbishing the downtown farmers market and Central Library, and renovating the Lister Block.

First-term mayor eyes helm of City of Hamilton for another four years

News Oct 15, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton Mayor Fred Eisenberger said he will seek a second term of office in next year’s municipal election.

The first term mayor, who upset the heavily favoured Larry Di Ianni in the 2006 municipal election, said he is proposing a wider agenda to continue what he describes as the city’s “momentum” of success.

“Most of the things I laid out in the election platform last time are either done or in the process, so sure I would like to see a lot of it completed,” said Mr. Eisenberger in an interview.

“But I have a lot of other things in the queue, big issues like light-rail transit, and the 2015 Pan Am (games announcement).”

The city did lose out on landing an NHL hockey franchise when an Arizona bankruptcy judge denied Canadian billionaire Jim Balsillie an opportunity to purchase the Arizona Coyotes. But Mr. Eisenberger is looking at a number of other city-changing projects, including being part of the Golden Horseshoe that would host the Pan Am Games and Metrolinx funding for the city’s light-rail transit project. Both announcements are expected over the next two months.

The mayor said he will be talking about the future of Hamilton in the campaign.

“We certainly would like to look down the road and say what is the future of the city and certainly that’s what we will be talking about.”

Mr. Eisenberger said he has not decided when he will make a formal announcement. Municipal candidates can begin registering to run in the November election after Jan. 1, 2010. Once a candidate is registered, the person can start raising money.

“I haven’t contemplated an announcement but I am delighted to be doing the work,” he said.

Mr. Eisenberger ran on a modest but reformist agenda that included establishing an integrity commissioner and an ombudsman in an attempt to “clean up” city hall. He also proposed bolstering funding to the economic development department, which council did in 2008 to the tune of $1.5 million, and adding more officers to the city’s police service. He was also associated with improving Hamilton’s environmental record, which included adding more bike lanes to city streets and making the city more pedestrian- friendly. Mr. Eisenberger has overseen a number of projects that began prior to him assuming office, including renovating city hall, relocating the downtown bus station to Hunter Street, refurbishing the downtown farmers market and Central Library, and renovating the Lister Block.