Technologies showcased during Fire Prevention Week

News Oct 15, 2009 Ancaster News

You’ve probably heard the warnings about smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms. But what about those annoying false alarms caused by steam from your shower? Is there a better way to comply with fire safety regulations without yanking the batteries out of your smoke alarm?

Hamilton firefighters teamed up with fire safety manufacturers last week to educate the public on the latest trends during Fire Prevention Week.

Eric Roberts, sales director for First Alert, said customers should be aware of the growing line of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. Smoke alarms come in two main formats: photoelectric and ionization. Ionization units respond to small particles, flame and heat. They typically cost less than photoelectric units, but are also prone to false alarms caused by steam. Mr. Roberts said several European jurisdictions have banned the use of ionization detectors.

By contrast, photoelectric smoke detectors respond to smoldering fires without yielding steam-induced false alarms. When buying a smoke detector, consumers should check the back of the box to determine what type they are purchasing.

While smoke detectors are now mandatory on every floor of your home, in accordance with Ontario’s fire code, carbon monoxide detectors are not required by law. But Ancaster fire captain Paul Lazzarato said every homeowner should pick up a carbon monoxide detector, especially during the early fall, when it’s time to re-start your furnace.

Carbon monoxide is generated by an incomplete burn from a fuel source, such as a natural gas furnace, wood stove or oil furnace. Carbon monoxide fumes are colourless, tasteless and odourless. They are virtually impossible to detect without the aid of a sensor.

Captain Lazzarato said firefighters recommend using a carbon monoxide detector with a battery back-up, in case of a power outage. Two-in-one smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are also available from manufacturer First Alert.

Technologies showcased during Fire Prevention Week

News Oct 15, 2009 Ancaster News

You’ve probably heard the warnings about smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms. But what about those annoying false alarms caused by steam from your shower? Is there a better way to comply with fire safety regulations without yanking the batteries out of your smoke alarm?

Hamilton firefighters teamed up with fire safety manufacturers last week to educate the public on the latest trends during Fire Prevention Week.

Eric Roberts, sales director for First Alert, said customers should be aware of the growing line of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. Smoke alarms come in two main formats: photoelectric and ionization. Ionization units respond to small particles, flame and heat. They typically cost less than photoelectric units, but are also prone to false alarms caused by steam. Mr. Roberts said several European jurisdictions have banned the use of ionization detectors.

By contrast, photoelectric smoke detectors respond to smoldering fires without yielding steam-induced false alarms. When buying a smoke detector, consumers should check the back of the box to determine what type they are purchasing.

While smoke detectors are now mandatory on every floor of your home, in accordance with Ontario’s fire code, carbon monoxide detectors are not required by law. But Ancaster fire captain Paul Lazzarato said every homeowner should pick up a carbon monoxide detector, especially during the early fall, when it’s time to re-start your furnace.

Carbon monoxide is generated by an incomplete burn from a fuel source, such as a natural gas furnace, wood stove or oil furnace. Carbon monoxide fumes are colourless, tasteless and odourless. They are virtually impossible to detect without the aid of a sensor.

Captain Lazzarato said firefighters recommend using a carbon monoxide detector with a battery back-up, in case of a power outage. Two-in-one smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are also available from manufacturer First Alert.

Technologies showcased during Fire Prevention Week

News Oct 15, 2009 Ancaster News

You’ve probably heard the warnings about smoke detectors and carbon monoxide alarms. But what about those annoying false alarms caused by steam from your shower? Is there a better way to comply with fire safety regulations without yanking the batteries out of your smoke alarm?

Hamilton firefighters teamed up with fire safety manufacturers last week to educate the public on the latest trends during Fire Prevention Week.

Eric Roberts, sales director for First Alert, said customers should be aware of the growing line of smoke and carbon monoxide detectors. Smoke alarms come in two main formats: photoelectric and ionization. Ionization units respond to small particles, flame and heat. They typically cost less than photoelectric units, but are also prone to false alarms caused by steam. Mr. Roberts said several European jurisdictions have banned the use of ionization detectors.

By contrast, photoelectric smoke detectors respond to smoldering fires without yielding steam-induced false alarms. When buying a smoke detector, consumers should check the back of the box to determine what type they are purchasing.

While smoke detectors are now mandatory on every floor of your home, in accordance with Ontario’s fire code, carbon monoxide detectors are not required by law. But Ancaster fire captain Paul Lazzarato said every homeowner should pick up a carbon monoxide detector, especially during the early fall, when it’s time to re-start your furnace.

Carbon monoxide is generated by an incomplete burn from a fuel source, such as a natural gas furnace, wood stove or oil furnace. Carbon monoxide fumes are colourless, tasteless and odourless. They are virtually impossible to detect without the aid of a sensor.

Captain Lazzarato said firefighters recommend using a carbon monoxide detector with a battery back-up, in case of a power outage. Two-in-one smoke and carbon monoxide detectors are also available from manufacturer First Alert.