Airport lands shrink in latest forecast

News Oct 15, 2009 Ancaster News

The controversial employment land study area around the Hamilton Airport has been reduced by over 200 hectares as city staff factor in the city’s 2006 demographic figures according to Hemson Consulting.

Guy Paparella, director Industrial Parks and Airport land, confirmed the city’s preferred growth strategy for the airport lands have been reduced from about 1,130 hectares to about 830 hectares.

“We used a different set of numbers rather than the 2001 census,” said Mr. Paparella. “This is more detailed work and a lot more surveying involved.”

The reduced employment land area will also mean a reduced number of jobs, he said. But Mr. Paparella points out since the studies have taken about two years to complete at a cost of about $1.15 million, the timeline to designate then accommodate the growth area has been shortened as well by about two to three years if is to meet its 2031 target.

“I think we have found a balance,” said Mr. Paparella, in an interview. “It’s not as large as it was, but it’s not as small to make it unrealistic. Hamilton has lost a lot of jobs and we have to recapture that. But we are talking about 22 years not 25.”

Dillon Consulting and city officials originally identified the preferred land use concept for the Airport Employment Growth District (AEGD) to the AEDG’s Community Liaison Committee meeting Aug. 19.

Dillon Consulting’s Anne Joyner told members of the CLC meeting Aug. 19 of the 1,176 net hectares of land contained in the Airport Employment Growth District, about 46 per cent would be designated prestige business park, while 32 per cent of the land would be zoned for light industrial.

“It’s a very nice balance,” she told the AEDG community liaison committee meeting in Mount Hope. “We want as much prestige as possible (for the area).”

The city and Dillon Consulting adopted the hybrid prestige/light industrial option over an entirely prestige or all industrial park designation, after conducting two public meetings held in May, and attended by about 175 people. They also held a number of discussions with various stakeholder groups, including the Ancaster Community Council.

A second round of public information sessions were held earlier this month which were attended by over 200 people, said Mr. Paparella. A number of concerns were expressed by residents, including cost, servicing, roads being upgraded, including Dickenson and Twenty Road, and worries about their own properties.

Mr. Paparella said the idea will be to phase in the employment lands in two stages. Stage one will expand the already 45 per cent of the land serviced to the rest of the area. It would allow the city to gradually fill up the employment area over the next seven years, allowing developers to pay for the area’s servicing needs.

Once stage one is complete by the 2031 target, it will be easier, said Mr. Paparella, to build services for the stage 2 area southwest of stage one, in the Highway 403 and Highway 6 areas.

“The developer will pay,” said Mr. Paparella. “It will be done through development charges. We will rely on them as much as possible.”

Mr. Paparella confirmed the provincial government, which the city has been butting heads with during the process, agreed there will be an urban boundary expansion that will involve hundreds of hectares.

Mr. Paparella is confident the city can fill up the airport employment lands, but it won’t happen overnight.

He said the city has to create the environment, including a servicing scheme and marketing plan, to attract the proper businesses.

“It is a long-term venture,” he said. “I wish we could fill it up in 10 years. It will take a little while. It’s just the beginning. It’s not a five-year deal.”

The preferred land use designation includes prestige business park on both sides of Butter Road, the south side of Book Road, east of Southcote, west of Glancaster and Book Road. It would include such uses as small offices, prestige smaller businesses, other services such as dry cleaning, and even restaurants. Mr. Paparella said residents living along Twenty Road wanted a Tim Hortons located in their neighbourhood.

Some of the interior prestige lands south of Garner Road, east of Glancaster Road and north of Dickenson Road, were replaced with light industrial to provide for more diverse employment uses.

“You don’t want a factory wall up against (residents),” said Mr. Paparella.

Light industrial was also designated along Fiddler’s Green to Carluke, and near Twenty Road and Dickenson, surrounded by prestige business park. Future airport land requirements were included to the eastern, southern and western boundary of the Hamilton Airport. The lands in the southern portion of the AEGD, adjacent to Airport Road and Highway 6, have been designated airport-related commercial. These areas are intended to provide such services as hotels, food and business services, and accessory retail to the airport operations.

The lands near the airport, to the eastern, southern and western border of the current airport holdings are to be reserved for future airport expansion.

About 44 hectares of land around Upper James, Twenty Road and Lincoln Alexander Parkway has been designated to be removed from the study area.

Airport lands shrink in latest forecast

News Oct 15, 2009 Ancaster News

The controversial employment land study area around the Hamilton Airport has been reduced by over 200 hectares as city staff factor in the city’s 2006 demographic figures according to Hemson Consulting.

Guy Paparella, director Industrial Parks and Airport land, confirmed the city’s preferred growth strategy for the airport lands have been reduced from about 1,130 hectares to about 830 hectares.

“We used a different set of numbers rather than the 2001 census,” said Mr. Paparella. “This is more detailed work and a lot more surveying involved.”

The reduced employment land area will also mean a reduced number of jobs, he said. But Mr. Paparella points out since the studies have taken about two years to complete at a cost of about $1.15 million, the timeline to designate then accommodate the growth area has been shortened as well by about two to three years if is to meet its 2031 target.

“I think we have found a balance,” said Mr. Paparella, in an interview. “It’s not as large as it was, but it’s not as small to make it unrealistic. Hamilton has lost a lot of jobs and we have to recapture that. But we are talking about 22 years not 25.”

Dillon Consulting and city officials originally identified the preferred land use concept for the Airport Employment Growth District (AEGD) to the AEDG’s Community Liaison Committee meeting Aug. 19.

Dillon Consulting’s Anne Joyner told members of the CLC meeting Aug. 19 of the 1,176 net hectares of land contained in the Airport Employment Growth District, about 46 per cent would be designated prestige business park, while 32 per cent of the land would be zoned for light industrial.

“It’s a very nice balance,” she told the AEDG community liaison committee meeting in Mount Hope. “We want as much prestige as possible (for the area).”

The city and Dillon Consulting adopted the hybrid prestige/light industrial option over an entirely prestige or all industrial park designation, after conducting two public meetings held in May, and attended by about 175 people. They also held a number of discussions with various stakeholder groups, including the Ancaster Community Council.

A second round of public information sessions were held earlier this month which were attended by over 200 people, said Mr. Paparella. A number of concerns were expressed by residents, including cost, servicing, roads being upgraded, including Dickenson and Twenty Road, and worries about their own properties.

Mr. Paparella said the idea will be to phase in the employment lands in two stages. Stage one will expand the already 45 per cent of the land serviced to the rest of the area. It would allow the city to gradually fill up the employment area over the next seven years, allowing developers to pay for the area’s servicing needs.

Once stage one is complete by the 2031 target, it will be easier, said Mr. Paparella, to build services for the stage 2 area southwest of stage one, in the Highway 403 and Highway 6 areas.

“The developer will pay,” said Mr. Paparella. “It will be done through development charges. We will rely on them as much as possible.”

Mr. Paparella confirmed the provincial government, which the city has been butting heads with during the process, agreed there will be an urban boundary expansion that will involve hundreds of hectares.

Mr. Paparella is confident the city can fill up the airport employment lands, but it won’t happen overnight.

He said the city has to create the environment, including a servicing scheme and marketing plan, to attract the proper businesses.

“It is a long-term venture,” he said. “I wish we could fill it up in 10 years. It will take a little while. It’s just the beginning. It’s not a five-year deal.”

The preferred land use designation includes prestige business park on both sides of Butter Road, the south side of Book Road, east of Southcote, west of Glancaster and Book Road. It would include such uses as small offices, prestige smaller businesses, other services such as dry cleaning, and even restaurants. Mr. Paparella said residents living along Twenty Road wanted a Tim Hortons located in their neighbourhood.

Some of the interior prestige lands south of Garner Road, east of Glancaster Road and north of Dickenson Road, were replaced with light industrial to provide for more diverse employment uses.

“You don’t want a factory wall up against (residents),” said Mr. Paparella.

Light industrial was also designated along Fiddler’s Green to Carluke, and near Twenty Road and Dickenson, surrounded by prestige business park. Future airport land requirements were included to the eastern, southern and western boundary of the Hamilton Airport. The lands in the southern portion of the AEGD, adjacent to Airport Road and Highway 6, have been designated airport-related commercial. These areas are intended to provide such services as hotels, food and business services, and accessory retail to the airport operations.

The lands near the airport, to the eastern, southern and western border of the current airport holdings are to be reserved for future airport expansion.

About 44 hectares of land around Upper James, Twenty Road and Lincoln Alexander Parkway has been designated to be removed from the study area.

Airport lands shrink in latest forecast

News Oct 15, 2009 Ancaster News

The controversial employment land study area around the Hamilton Airport has been reduced by over 200 hectares as city staff factor in the city’s 2006 demographic figures according to Hemson Consulting.

Guy Paparella, director Industrial Parks and Airport land, confirmed the city’s preferred growth strategy for the airport lands have been reduced from about 1,130 hectares to about 830 hectares.

“We used a different set of numbers rather than the 2001 census,” said Mr. Paparella. “This is more detailed work and a lot more surveying involved.”

The reduced employment land area will also mean a reduced number of jobs, he said. But Mr. Paparella points out since the studies have taken about two years to complete at a cost of about $1.15 million, the timeline to designate then accommodate the growth area has been shortened as well by about two to three years if is to meet its 2031 target.

“I think we have found a balance,” said Mr. Paparella, in an interview. “It’s not as large as it was, but it’s not as small to make it unrealistic. Hamilton has lost a lot of jobs and we have to recapture that. But we are talking about 22 years not 25.”

Dillon Consulting and city officials originally identified the preferred land use concept for the Airport Employment Growth District (AEGD) to the AEDG’s Community Liaison Committee meeting Aug. 19.

Dillon Consulting’s Anne Joyner told members of the CLC meeting Aug. 19 of the 1,176 net hectares of land contained in the Airport Employment Growth District, about 46 per cent would be designated prestige business park, while 32 per cent of the land would be zoned for light industrial.

“It’s a very nice balance,” she told the AEDG community liaison committee meeting in Mount Hope. “We want as much prestige as possible (for the area).”

The city and Dillon Consulting adopted the hybrid prestige/light industrial option over an entirely prestige or all industrial park designation, after conducting two public meetings held in May, and attended by about 175 people. They also held a number of discussions with various stakeholder groups, including the Ancaster Community Council.

A second round of public information sessions were held earlier this month which were attended by over 200 people, said Mr. Paparella. A number of concerns were expressed by residents, including cost, servicing, roads being upgraded, including Dickenson and Twenty Road, and worries about their own properties.

Mr. Paparella said the idea will be to phase in the employment lands in two stages. Stage one will expand the already 45 per cent of the land serviced to the rest of the area. It would allow the city to gradually fill up the employment area over the next seven years, allowing developers to pay for the area’s servicing needs.

Once stage one is complete by the 2031 target, it will be easier, said Mr. Paparella, to build services for the stage 2 area southwest of stage one, in the Highway 403 and Highway 6 areas.

“The developer will pay,” said Mr. Paparella. “It will be done through development charges. We will rely on them as much as possible.”

Mr. Paparella confirmed the provincial government, which the city has been butting heads with during the process, agreed there will be an urban boundary expansion that will involve hundreds of hectares.

Mr. Paparella is confident the city can fill up the airport employment lands, but it won’t happen overnight.

He said the city has to create the environment, including a servicing scheme and marketing plan, to attract the proper businesses.

“It is a long-term venture,” he said. “I wish we could fill it up in 10 years. It will take a little while. It’s just the beginning. It’s not a five-year deal.”

The preferred land use designation includes prestige business park on both sides of Butter Road, the south side of Book Road, east of Southcote, west of Glancaster and Book Road. It would include such uses as small offices, prestige smaller businesses, other services such as dry cleaning, and even restaurants. Mr. Paparella said residents living along Twenty Road wanted a Tim Hortons located in their neighbourhood.

Some of the interior prestige lands south of Garner Road, east of Glancaster Road and north of Dickenson Road, were replaced with light industrial to provide for more diverse employment uses.

“You don’t want a factory wall up against (residents),” said Mr. Paparella.

Light industrial was also designated along Fiddler’s Green to Carluke, and near Twenty Road and Dickenson, surrounded by prestige business park. Future airport land requirements were included to the eastern, southern and western boundary of the Hamilton Airport. The lands in the southern portion of the AEGD, adjacent to Airport Road and Highway 6, have been designated airport-related commercial. These areas are intended to provide such services as hotels, food and business services, and accessory retail to the airport operations.

The lands near the airport, to the eastern, southern and western border of the current airport holdings are to be reserved for future airport expansion.

About 44 hectares of land around Upper James, Twenty Road and Lincoln Alexander Parkway has been designated to be removed from the study area.