Grange School project withstands appeal

News Oct 09, 2009 Ancaster News

The city’s planned redevelopment of the former Grange School site has withstood a test by the Ontario Municipal Board.

After purchasing the property in 2005 for more than $1.5 million, the city launched a plan to convert the property into housing and a passive park.

After residents rejected a plan for up to 27 townhouses, the community committee voted to support a plan for nine single-family homes with a 2.4 acre passive park at 306 Woodworth Dr.

The property was purchased using the former Town of Ancaster reserve fund. By selling the development portion to a home builder, the city is expected to recoup a portion of the investment.

Appellants Jim Enos, Joe Taibi and David Pentland argued the lands should have been zoned entirely for parklands to meet a parkland deficiency in the area.

City planner Trevor Horzelenberg said although a parkland deficiency of 2.17 hectares had been identified in the former Ancaster official plan, the plan establishing park standards was amended in 2006.

Based upon current planning guidelines, Mr. Horzelenberg said the property would have a slight surplus of park land.

Ancaster Councillor Lloyd Ferguson said now that the project has passed the test at the OMB, the plan could be used as a benchmark for similar school redevelopments across the city. Grange School closed in 2005 along with Maple Lane School, following the completion of Ancaster Meadow School.

“The nine lots will now be put our for tender and be awarded to the highest bidder,” explained Mr. Ferguson. “The successful bidder must comply with the rezoning that has been approved by Council and the OMB.”

The city’s list of recommended capital projects for 2011 and 2012 includes funding for a development that will become known as Perth Park.

The proposed Perth Park is less than one hectare, but it could include a creative play structure, sun shelter, seating and asphalt pathway.

Grange School project withstands appeal

News Oct 09, 2009 Ancaster News

The city’s planned redevelopment of the former Grange School site has withstood a test by the Ontario Municipal Board.

After purchasing the property in 2005 for more than $1.5 million, the city launched a plan to convert the property into housing and a passive park.

After residents rejected a plan for up to 27 townhouses, the community committee voted to support a plan for nine single-family homes with a 2.4 acre passive park at 306 Woodworth Dr.

The property was purchased using the former Town of Ancaster reserve fund. By selling the development portion to a home builder, the city is expected to recoup a portion of the investment.

Appellants Jim Enos, Joe Taibi and David Pentland argued the lands should have been zoned entirely for parklands to meet a parkland deficiency in the area.

City planner Trevor Horzelenberg said although a parkland deficiency of 2.17 hectares had been identified in the former Ancaster official plan, the plan establishing park standards was amended in 2006.

Based upon current planning guidelines, Mr. Horzelenberg said the property would have a slight surplus of park land.

Ancaster Councillor Lloyd Ferguson said now that the project has passed the test at the OMB, the plan could be used as a benchmark for similar school redevelopments across the city. Grange School closed in 2005 along with Maple Lane School, following the completion of Ancaster Meadow School.

“The nine lots will now be put our for tender and be awarded to the highest bidder,” explained Mr. Ferguson. “The successful bidder must comply with the rezoning that has been approved by Council and the OMB.”

The city’s list of recommended capital projects for 2011 and 2012 includes funding for a development that will become known as Perth Park.

The proposed Perth Park is less than one hectare, but it could include a creative play structure, sun shelter, seating and asphalt pathway.

Grange School project withstands appeal

News Oct 09, 2009 Ancaster News

The city’s planned redevelopment of the former Grange School site has withstood a test by the Ontario Municipal Board.

After purchasing the property in 2005 for more than $1.5 million, the city launched a plan to convert the property into housing and a passive park.

After residents rejected a plan for up to 27 townhouses, the community committee voted to support a plan for nine single-family homes with a 2.4 acre passive park at 306 Woodworth Dr.

The property was purchased using the former Town of Ancaster reserve fund. By selling the development portion to a home builder, the city is expected to recoup a portion of the investment.

Appellants Jim Enos, Joe Taibi and David Pentland argued the lands should have been zoned entirely for parklands to meet a parkland deficiency in the area.

City planner Trevor Horzelenberg said although a parkland deficiency of 2.17 hectares had been identified in the former Ancaster official plan, the plan establishing park standards was amended in 2006.

Based upon current planning guidelines, Mr. Horzelenberg said the property would have a slight surplus of park land.

Ancaster Councillor Lloyd Ferguson said now that the project has passed the test at the OMB, the plan could be used as a benchmark for similar school redevelopments across the city. Grange School closed in 2005 along with Maple Lane School, following the completion of Ancaster Meadow School.

“The nine lots will now be put our for tender and be awarded to the highest bidder,” explained Mr. Ferguson. “The successful bidder must comply with the rezoning that has been approved by Council and the OMB.”

The city’s list of recommended capital projects for 2011 and 2012 includes funding for a development that will become known as Perth Park.

The proposed Perth Park is less than one hectare, but it could include a creative play structure, sun shelter, seating and asphalt pathway.