Roundabouts are in our future

News Oct 09, 2009 Ancaster News

Many jurisdictions across Canada are changing how they build their intersections.

Some have added stop signs where there weren’t any before and others have replaced their stop signs with traffic lights.

It's all about ensuring drivers can avoid collisions with other drivers.

To help us at intersections, some jurisdictions are also building roundabouts. They are very common in Europe and in Alberta, but are somewhat new in Ontario.

There are, and have been, small roundabouts in residential areas for a number of years, but the larger roundabouts with multiple lanes are beginning to pop up. It’s important that we all know how to use them properly. They may be coming to your city or town very soon.

The west Mountain now has a roundabout at Stone Church Road, west of Upper Paradise. I was pleased to see the city use a roundabout as opposed to an all way stop or traffic lights. They are relatively easy to use, providing you understand them.

That’s where I can come in.

As you approach the roundabout you‚ you’ll come across a yield sign. It’s important to yield to everyone who is already in the roundabout until you‚ you’re certain they won’t come across your path.

Pedestrians must also be given the right of way if they have reached the crosswalk before you‚ you’ve arrived or before you get a chance to enter the roundabout. If you plan to turn right at the first street, you enter and then signal to the right immediately. If you want to proceed straight, you must signal your exit once you‚ you’ve passed the first street.

If you need to make a left turn through the roundabout, you, you’ll still need to follow to the right of the circle and then as you pass the second exit, you, you’ll need to put on your right signal to signal your exit.

If you want to do a U-turn, you‚ you’ll need to follow the circle and then signal to the right to exit as you approach the street you want.

Communication is clearly an important part of driving through a roundabout.

For pedestrians to use the area of the roundabout, you must also follow certain rules. You‚ you’ll need to pay attention at all times as a pedestrian and be prepared to make clear decisions.

If you want to walk through the crosswalk, step up to the curb and point your finger across the crosswalk to let the drivers know you wish to cross the street. Keep pointing until you reach the other side. Pay attention to all of the drivers in or near the roundabout until you reach the other side of the road. Wait until every driver has a chance to yield to you before you attempt to cross.

Please ensure you always use the crosswalk and never try to cut across the middle of the roundabout.

Driving through roundabouts takes observation, patience and cooperation from drivers, cyclists and pedestrians. They are a great way to help traffic keep moving and are far safer than traffic lights and stop signs. I hope my explanation will help your understanding, in a roundabout sort of way!

Roundabouts are in our future

News Oct 09, 2009 Ancaster News

Many jurisdictions across Canada are changing how they build their intersections.

Some have added stop signs where there weren’t any before and others have replaced their stop signs with traffic lights.

It's all about ensuring drivers can avoid collisions with other drivers.

To help us at intersections, some jurisdictions are also building roundabouts. They are very common in Europe and in Alberta, but are somewhat new in Ontario.

There are, and have been, small roundabouts in residential areas for a number of years, but the larger roundabouts with multiple lanes are beginning to pop up. It’s important that we all know how to use them properly. They may be coming to your city or town very soon.

The west Mountain now has a roundabout at Stone Church Road, west of Upper Paradise. I was pleased to see the city use a roundabout as opposed to an all way stop or traffic lights. They are relatively easy to use, providing you understand them.

That’s where I can come in.

As you approach the roundabout you‚ you’ll come across a yield sign. It’s important to yield to everyone who is already in the roundabout until you‚ you’re certain they won’t come across your path.

Pedestrians must also be given the right of way if they have reached the crosswalk before you‚ you’ve arrived or before you get a chance to enter the roundabout. If you plan to turn right at the first street, you enter and then signal to the right immediately. If you want to proceed straight, you must signal your exit once you‚ you’ve passed the first street.

If you need to make a left turn through the roundabout, you, you’ll still need to follow to the right of the circle and then as you pass the second exit, you, you’ll need to put on your right signal to signal your exit.

If you want to do a U-turn, you‚ you’ll need to follow the circle and then signal to the right to exit as you approach the street you want.

Communication is clearly an important part of driving through a roundabout.

For pedestrians to use the area of the roundabout, you must also follow certain rules. You‚ you’ll need to pay attention at all times as a pedestrian and be prepared to make clear decisions.

If you want to walk through the crosswalk, step up to the curb and point your finger across the crosswalk to let the drivers know you wish to cross the street. Keep pointing until you reach the other side. Pay attention to all of the drivers in or near the roundabout until you reach the other side of the road. Wait until every driver has a chance to yield to you before you attempt to cross.

Please ensure you always use the crosswalk and never try to cut across the middle of the roundabout.

Driving through roundabouts takes observation, patience and cooperation from drivers, cyclists and pedestrians. They are a great way to help traffic keep moving and are far safer than traffic lights and stop signs. I hope my explanation will help your understanding, in a roundabout sort of way!

Roundabouts are in our future

News Oct 09, 2009 Ancaster News

Many jurisdictions across Canada are changing how they build their intersections.

Some have added stop signs where there weren’t any before and others have replaced their stop signs with traffic lights.

It's all about ensuring drivers can avoid collisions with other drivers.

To help us at intersections, some jurisdictions are also building roundabouts. They are very common in Europe and in Alberta, but are somewhat new in Ontario.

There are, and have been, small roundabouts in residential areas for a number of years, but the larger roundabouts with multiple lanes are beginning to pop up. It’s important that we all know how to use them properly. They may be coming to your city or town very soon.

The west Mountain now has a roundabout at Stone Church Road, west of Upper Paradise. I was pleased to see the city use a roundabout as opposed to an all way stop or traffic lights. They are relatively easy to use, providing you understand them.

That’s where I can come in.

As you approach the roundabout you‚ you’ll come across a yield sign. It’s important to yield to everyone who is already in the roundabout until you‚ you’re certain they won’t come across your path.

Pedestrians must also be given the right of way if they have reached the crosswalk before you‚ you’ve arrived or before you get a chance to enter the roundabout. If you plan to turn right at the first street, you enter and then signal to the right immediately. If you want to proceed straight, you must signal your exit once you‚ you’ve passed the first street.

If you need to make a left turn through the roundabout, you, you’ll still need to follow to the right of the circle and then as you pass the second exit, you, you’ll need to put on your right signal to signal your exit.

If you want to do a U-turn, you‚ you’ll need to follow the circle and then signal to the right to exit as you approach the street you want.

Communication is clearly an important part of driving through a roundabout.

For pedestrians to use the area of the roundabout, you must also follow certain rules. You‚ you’ll need to pay attention at all times as a pedestrian and be prepared to make clear decisions.

If you want to walk through the crosswalk, step up to the curb and point your finger across the crosswalk to let the drivers know you wish to cross the street. Keep pointing until you reach the other side. Pay attention to all of the drivers in or near the roundabout until you reach the other side of the road. Wait until every driver has a chance to yield to you before you attempt to cross.

Please ensure you always use the crosswalk and never try to cut across the middle of the roundabout.

Driving through roundabouts takes observation, patience and cooperation from drivers, cyclists and pedestrians. They are a great way to help traffic keep moving and are far safer than traffic lights and stop signs. I hope my explanation will help your understanding, in a roundabout sort of way!