Honouring Our Lifeblood recognizes donors’ impact on lives of others

News Oct 02, 2009 Ancaster News

In these uncertain economic times, not all financial planners are viewed as life savers.

But Paul Holmes is definitely the exception. Directly, he can be credited with positively impacting the lives of 240 people. Indirectly, his impact is immeasurable.

Mr. Holmes was honoured by Canadian Blood Services earlier this month for his contribution to the country’s blood system.

He has made a total of 80 whole blood and platelet donations — each one saving up to three lives. His volunteer duties with the Speaking Up to Save Lives program has also triggered improvements in numerous lives.

“Paul has gone above and beyond what other volunteers do,” states volunteer recruiter Andrea Davies in Mr. Holmes’ nomination papers. “Not only is he a volunteer, he is a blood donor, speaker, fundraiser and friend to Canadian Blood Services and the many people it supports.

“With his dynamic personality, Paul was not content to just come into the clinic to donate. He was passionate about spreading the word about donating blood to others. ”

Since being trained to become part of CBS’s Speakers Bureau in 2005, Mr. Holmes has participated in 18 events, speaking to more than 825 community members about the importance of donating blood.

He travels throughout the Niagara, Hamilton and Kitchener-Waterloo areas to ensure that if an engagement is available, the recruitment opportunity will not be missed.

“The feedback is so measurable,” said Mr. Holmes. “You speak and motivate people to donate blood.

“Every person you can get to donate saves three lives and that’s the name of the game...getting people to make a conscious decision to think about the need because most are healthy people and they don’t think they’ll need blood. Statistics show, however, that half of us are going to need it one day.”

Mr. Holmes is self-employed as a financial advisor and works from his Dundas home office. Being home-based allows him not only the flexibility for public speaking but also platelet donations.

Using a method called apheresis, individuals can donate particular blood components such as platelets, plasma, and red blood cells. A special machine separates the needed component and returns the rest of the blood to the donor. Bone marrow transplant, cancer and leukemia patients whose immune systems are already compromised particularly benefit from single donor platelet transfusions.

“The need is increasing five to six per cent a year,” said Mr. Holmes of platelet donations. “It takes about an hour and a half (to donate), and from what I understand, the donation goes to a specific patient. It has a shelf life of about five days because I’ll get a call saying you need to come in tomorrow...”

Motivated by his father, Mr. Holmes started donating blood while he was a high school student growing up in Mississauga. After a hiatus of several years, he began donating again.

In January 2002, wanting to contribute more of his skills and expertise, Mr. Holmes became a volunteer at the Dundas community clinics. He volunteered 3.5 hours every month, providing assistance in whatever role was required. A couple of years later, he took on the role of volunteer leader.

Then, in 2004, Mr. Holmes extended his commitment by becoming a public speaker.

In his various volunteer roles, Mr. Holmes has contributed more than 375 hours to the blood program, but nevertheless said he was shocked to receive the national recognition from CBS during its annual Honouring Our Lifeblood ceremony in Ottawa.

“I didn’t expect it and it’s totally unnecessary, but I’m really honoured and appreciate it.”

Each year, hundreds of thousands of blood donors and volunteers, as well as more than 700 community groups, sponsors and partners, work together to help ensure those needing blood receive it.

And Mr. Holmes doesn’t anticipate his volunteer commitment to wane any time soon.

“As long as my health is good and I don’t travel to too many exotic locations, I’ll be donating until my 70s.”

For more information on CBS, call 1-888-2 DONATE (1-888-236-6283) or visit www.blood.ca

Honouring Our Lifeblood recognizes donors’ impact on lives of others

News Oct 02, 2009 Ancaster News

In these uncertain economic times, not all financial planners are viewed as life savers.

But Paul Holmes is definitely the exception. Directly, he can be credited with positively impacting the lives of 240 people. Indirectly, his impact is immeasurable.

Mr. Holmes was honoured by Canadian Blood Services earlier this month for his contribution to the country’s blood system.

He has made a total of 80 whole blood and platelet donations — each one saving up to three lives. His volunteer duties with the Speaking Up to Save Lives program has also triggered improvements in numerous lives.

“Paul has gone above and beyond what other volunteers do,” states volunteer recruiter Andrea Davies in Mr. Holmes’ nomination papers. “Not only is he a volunteer, he is a blood donor, speaker, fundraiser and friend to Canadian Blood Services and the many people it supports.

“With his dynamic personality, Paul was not content to just come into the clinic to donate. He was passionate about spreading the word about donating blood to others. ”

Since being trained to become part of CBS’s Speakers Bureau in 2005, Mr. Holmes has participated in 18 events, speaking to more than 825 community members about the importance of donating blood.

He travels throughout the Niagara, Hamilton and Kitchener-Waterloo areas to ensure that if an engagement is available, the recruitment opportunity will not be missed.

“The feedback is so measurable,” said Mr. Holmes. “You speak and motivate people to donate blood.

“Every person you can get to donate saves three lives and that’s the name of the game...getting people to make a conscious decision to think about the need because most are healthy people and they don’t think they’ll need blood. Statistics show, however, that half of us are going to need it one day.”

Mr. Holmes is self-employed as a financial advisor and works from his Dundas home office. Being home-based allows him not only the flexibility for public speaking but also platelet donations.

Using a method called apheresis, individuals can donate particular blood components such as platelets, plasma, and red blood cells. A special machine separates the needed component and returns the rest of the blood to the donor. Bone marrow transplant, cancer and leukemia patients whose immune systems are already compromised particularly benefit from single donor platelet transfusions.

“The need is increasing five to six per cent a year,” said Mr. Holmes of platelet donations. “It takes about an hour and a half (to donate), and from what I understand, the donation goes to a specific patient. It has a shelf life of about five days because I’ll get a call saying you need to come in tomorrow...”

Motivated by his father, Mr. Holmes started donating blood while he was a high school student growing up in Mississauga. After a hiatus of several years, he began donating again.

In January 2002, wanting to contribute more of his skills and expertise, Mr. Holmes became a volunteer at the Dundas community clinics. He volunteered 3.5 hours every month, providing assistance in whatever role was required. A couple of years later, he took on the role of volunteer leader.

Then, in 2004, Mr. Holmes extended his commitment by becoming a public speaker.

In his various volunteer roles, Mr. Holmes has contributed more than 375 hours to the blood program, but nevertheless said he was shocked to receive the national recognition from CBS during its annual Honouring Our Lifeblood ceremony in Ottawa.

“I didn’t expect it and it’s totally unnecessary, but I’m really honoured and appreciate it.”

Each year, hundreds of thousands of blood donors and volunteers, as well as more than 700 community groups, sponsors and partners, work together to help ensure those needing blood receive it.

And Mr. Holmes doesn’t anticipate his volunteer commitment to wane any time soon.

“As long as my health is good and I don’t travel to too many exotic locations, I’ll be donating until my 70s.”

For more information on CBS, call 1-888-2 DONATE (1-888-236-6283) or visit www.blood.ca

Honouring Our Lifeblood recognizes donors’ impact on lives of others

News Oct 02, 2009 Ancaster News

In these uncertain economic times, not all financial planners are viewed as life savers.

But Paul Holmes is definitely the exception. Directly, he can be credited with positively impacting the lives of 240 people. Indirectly, his impact is immeasurable.

Mr. Holmes was honoured by Canadian Blood Services earlier this month for his contribution to the country’s blood system.

He has made a total of 80 whole blood and platelet donations — each one saving up to three lives. His volunteer duties with the Speaking Up to Save Lives program has also triggered improvements in numerous lives.

“Paul has gone above and beyond what other volunteers do,” states volunteer recruiter Andrea Davies in Mr. Holmes’ nomination papers. “Not only is he a volunteer, he is a blood donor, speaker, fundraiser and friend to Canadian Blood Services and the many people it supports.

“With his dynamic personality, Paul was not content to just come into the clinic to donate. He was passionate about spreading the word about donating blood to others. ”

Since being trained to become part of CBS’s Speakers Bureau in 2005, Mr. Holmes has participated in 18 events, speaking to more than 825 community members about the importance of donating blood.

He travels throughout the Niagara, Hamilton and Kitchener-Waterloo areas to ensure that if an engagement is available, the recruitment opportunity will not be missed.

“The feedback is so measurable,” said Mr. Holmes. “You speak and motivate people to donate blood.

“Every person you can get to donate saves three lives and that’s the name of the game...getting people to make a conscious decision to think about the need because most are healthy people and they don’t think they’ll need blood. Statistics show, however, that half of us are going to need it one day.”

Mr. Holmes is self-employed as a financial advisor and works from his Dundas home office. Being home-based allows him not only the flexibility for public speaking but also platelet donations.

Using a method called apheresis, individuals can donate particular blood components such as platelets, plasma, and red blood cells. A special machine separates the needed component and returns the rest of the blood to the donor. Bone marrow transplant, cancer and leukemia patients whose immune systems are already compromised particularly benefit from single donor platelet transfusions.

“The need is increasing five to six per cent a year,” said Mr. Holmes of platelet donations. “It takes about an hour and a half (to donate), and from what I understand, the donation goes to a specific patient. It has a shelf life of about five days because I’ll get a call saying you need to come in tomorrow...”

Motivated by his father, Mr. Holmes started donating blood while he was a high school student growing up in Mississauga. After a hiatus of several years, he began donating again.

In January 2002, wanting to contribute more of his skills and expertise, Mr. Holmes became a volunteer at the Dundas community clinics. He volunteered 3.5 hours every month, providing assistance in whatever role was required. A couple of years later, he took on the role of volunteer leader.

Then, in 2004, Mr. Holmes extended his commitment by becoming a public speaker.

In his various volunteer roles, Mr. Holmes has contributed more than 375 hours to the blood program, but nevertheless said he was shocked to receive the national recognition from CBS during its annual Honouring Our Lifeblood ceremony in Ottawa.

“I didn’t expect it and it’s totally unnecessary, but I’m really honoured and appreciate it.”

Each year, hundreds of thousands of blood donors and volunteers, as well as more than 700 community groups, sponsors and partners, work together to help ensure those needing blood receive it.

And Mr. Holmes doesn’t anticipate his volunteer commitment to wane any time soon.

“As long as my health is good and I don’t travel to too many exotic locations, I’ll be donating until my 70s.”

For more information on CBS, call 1-888-2 DONATE (1-888-236-6283) or visit www.blood.ca