Transitioning lanes is recipe for disaster

News Oct 02, 2009 Ancaster News

Re: Loss of family pet renews calls for Governor’s Rd. improvements, Sept. 18 The News.

I was somewhat surprised that a dog killed in traffic should act as an additional catalyst for improvements to a roadway. First, let me state that I am also a dog owner and I have the greatest sympathy for Mr. Mckeown. I would be devastated to lose my pet under similar circumstances.

I completely agree with Mr. Mckeown that speeding is a problem that needs to be addressed by better enforcement, education, signage and signals where appropriate. However, the incident in question really doesn’t have any significance as far as physical alterations to the roadway are concerned.

There are many other roads in the area where a similar accident could occur. When walking my dog in these areas, I keep the leash extremely short and secure and keep myself between my dog and the road. Speed may very well have been a factor but the dog may have been killed even if the car was travelling at or under the speed limit. The driver not stopping is inexcusable.

I live very close to Governor's Road and both walk and drive the stretch from Creighton to Osler on a daily basis. In my opinion, widening Governor's Road to four lanes between Creighton and Ogilvie will only make the situation much worse. The road is already three lanes in this area, which is the worst section for speeding with the two westbound lanes being the biggest problem. Increasing the road to four lanes will make it even more dangerous.

Aside from the significant taxpayer expense, making this section of the road four lanes will essentially turn it into a race track as cars try and get ahead of each other before the road reverts back to two lanes. A wider sidewalk with a buffer would be a better solution for pedestrians and cyclists. If the road is to be widened at all, it would need to be four lanes from Davidson all the way to Cootes Drive, including Dundas Street and removing parking from Dundas Street.

As planned for, transitioning from two lanes to four lanes and back to two lanes in such a short distance is a recipe for disaster. In addition, there is likely not enough room to do this effectively and leave an appropriate buffer without tearing down some of the houses on Governor's Road.

Congestion is not a serious problem on the road at this time. Aside from relatively brief morning and evening rush hours, traffic on Governor's is surprisingly light, and removing light congestion will only result in higher traffic speeds anyway. Typically, cars are driven faster on a four-lane road than a two-lane road in urban areas due to the drivers' capability to pass and change lanes to "get ahead" and more open space between vehicles.

The area of Governor's Road that does need real attention immediately is the section between Ogilvie and Osler, particularly the intersection with Osler and the entrance to the Shopper's plaza. This is by far the worst intersection in Dundas, partly because drivers do not apparently understand that the left-turn lane onto Main is not also a left-turn lane into the plaza. The combination of three high volume stores in one very small plaza with a tiny parking lot and a busy, constricted roadway is definitely not conducive to a safe and efficient flow of traffic.

Chris Juzda, Dundas

Transitioning lanes is recipe for disaster

News Oct 02, 2009 Ancaster News

Re: Loss of family pet renews calls for Governor’s Rd. improvements, Sept. 18 The News.

I was somewhat surprised that a dog killed in traffic should act as an additional catalyst for improvements to a roadway. First, let me state that I am also a dog owner and I have the greatest sympathy for Mr. Mckeown. I would be devastated to lose my pet under similar circumstances.

I completely agree with Mr. Mckeown that speeding is a problem that needs to be addressed by better enforcement, education, signage and signals where appropriate. However, the incident in question really doesn’t have any significance as far as physical alterations to the roadway are concerned.

There are many other roads in the area where a similar accident could occur. When walking my dog in these areas, I keep the leash extremely short and secure and keep myself between my dog and the road. Speed may very well have been a factor but the dog may have been killed even if the car was travelling at or under the speed limit. The driver not stopping is inexcusable.

I live very close to Governor's Road and both walk and drive the stretch from Creighton to Osler on a daily basis. In my opinion, widening Governor's Road to four lanes between Creighton and Ogilvie will only make the situation much worse. The road is already three lanes in this area, which is the worst section for speeding with the two westbound lanes being the biggest problem. Increasing the road to four lanes will make it even more dangerous.

Aside from the significant taxpayer expense, making this section of the road four lanes will essentially turn it into a race track as cars try and get ahead of each other before the road reverts back to two lanes. A wider sidewalk with a buffer would be a better solution for pedestrians and cyclists. If the road is to be widened at all, it would need to be four lanes from Davidson all the way to Cootes Drive, including Dundas Street and removing parking from Dundas Street.

As planned for, transitioning from two lanes to four lanes and back to two lanes in such a short distance is a recipe for disaster. In addition, there is likely not enough room to do this effectively and leave an appropriate buffer without tearing down some of the houses on Governor's Road.

Congestion is not a serious problem on the road at this time. Aside from relatively brief morning and evening rush hours, traffic on Governor's is surprisingly light, and removing light congestion will only result in higher traffic speeds anyway. Typically, cars are driven faster on a four-lane road than a two-lane road in urban areas due to the drivers' capability to pass and change lanes to "get ahead" and more open space between vehicles.

The area of Governor's Road that does need real attention immediately is the section between Ogilvie and Osler, particularly the intersection with Osler and the entrance to the Shopper's plaza. This is by far the worst intersection in Dundas, partly because drivers do not apparently understand that the left-turn lane onto Main is not also a left-turn lane into the plaza. The combination of three high volume stores in one very small plaza with a tiny parking lot and a busy, constricted roadway is definitely not conducive to a safe and efficient flow of traffic.

Chris Juzda, Dundas

Transitioning lanes is recipe for disaster

News Oct 02, 2009 Ancaster News

Re: Loss of family pet renews calls for Governor’s Rd. improvements, Sept. 18 The News.

I was somewhat surprised that a dog killed in traffic should act as an additional catalyst for improvements to a roadway. First, let me state that I am also a dog owner and I have the greatest sympathy for Mr. Mckeown. I would be devastated to lose my pet under similar circumstances.

I completely agree with Mr. Mckeown that speeding is a problem that needs to be addressed by better enforcement, education, signage and signals where appropriate. However, the incident in question really doesn’t have any significance as far as physical alterations to the roadway are concerned.

There are many other roads in the area where a similar accident could occur. When walking my dog in these areas, I keep the leash extremely short and secure and keep myself between my dog and the road. Speed may very well have been a factor but the dog may have been killed even if the car was travelling at or under the speed limit. The driver not stopping is inexcusable.

I live very close to Governor's Road and both walk and drive the stretch from Creighton to Osler on a daily basis. In my opinion, widening Governor's Road to four lanes between Creighton and Ogilvie will only make the situation much worse. The road is already three lanes in this area, which is the worst section for speeding with the two westbound lanes being the biggest problem. Increasing the road to four lanes will make it even more dangerous.

Aside from the significant taxpayer expense, making this section of the road four lanes will essentially turn it into a race track as cars try and get ahead of each other before the road reverts back to two lanes. A wider sidewalk with a buffer would be a better solution for pedestrians and cyclists. If the road is to be widened at all, it would need to be four lanes from Davidson all the way to Cootes Drive, including Dundas Street and removing parking from Dundas Street.

As planned for, transitioning from two lanes to four lanes and back to two lanes in such a short distance is a recipe for disaster. In addition, there is likely not enough room to do this effectively and leave an appropriate buffer without tearing down some of the houses on Governor's Road.

Congestion is not a serious problem on the road at this time. Aside from relatively brief morning and evening rush hours, traffic on Governor's is surprisingly light, and removing light congestion will only result in higher traffic speeds anyway. Typically, cars are driven faster on a four-lane road than a two-lane road in urban areas due to the drivers' capability to pass and change lanes to "get ahead" and more open space between vehicles.

The area of Governor's Road that does need real attention immediately is the section between Ogilvie and Osler, particularly the intersection with Osler and the entrance to the Shopper's plaza. This is by far the worst intersection in Dundas, partly because drivers do not apparently understand that the left-turn lane onto Main is not also a left-turn lane into the plaza. The combination of three high volume stores in one very small plaza with a tiny parking lot and a busy, constricted roadway is definitely not conducive to a safe and efficient flow of traffic.

Chris Juzda, Dundas