Exhibitions blur boundaries of science, art

News Oct 02, 2009 Ancaster News

Dianne Bos, a one-time Dundas resident and graduate of Parkside Secondary School, currently divides her time between the foothills of the Rockies and the Pyrenees, but has returned home temporarily to collaborate on and curate two new exhibitions at the McMaster Museum of Art.

Both exhibitions blur the boundaries between science and art.

For Light Echo, Ms. Bos collaborated with McMaster University astronomer Doug Welch, also a Dundas resident, on an ambitious installation.

Their goal is to give earthlings a second chance to view a centuries-old supernova. The exhibition will re-create both the twinkling night sky in Cassiopeia and a Dutch 17th century artist’s studio, complete with period paintings from McMaster’s permanent collection and other artifacts.

Exploring links between art and science, specifically optics, physiology, biology, geography and the scientific aesthetic, is the focus of A Field Guide to Observing Art.

“This is your chance to make your own observations in the field, and to think about what characteristics lead us to classify something as a work of art or as a document of science,” said Ms. Bos.

“Is it their markings, styles, habits and origins?”

Surrounding a central observation platform, complete with viewing telescopes and interpretive signs, are 32 works of art from the McMaster Museum of Art’s permanent collection by celebrated artists like Claude Monet, Naum Gabo, Andy Goldsworthy, Eadweard Muybridge, Micah Lexier, Richard Long, Arnaud Maggs and Bridget Riley.

“The important thing,” said Ms. Bos, “is to get out into the field and observe with fresh eyes.”

This exhibition raises the questions: Where does art end and science begin? Are artists and scientists truly different species of observers? How different are the representations they make, based on what they observe?

Ms. Bos’ art has been exhibited internationally in numerous group and solo exhibitions since 1981 and was featured in the nationally touring exhibitions Time and Space (University of Lethbridge Art Gallery) and Dark Matter: The Great War and Fading Memory (Confederation Centre of the Arts).

Ms. Bos’ photographic work has appeared in a number of international publications. Her garden photography and writing have been published in Canadian, American and Japanese magazines. In 2005 she was awarded the National Magazine Gold Medal Award for a series on the adventures of medieval house buying in France.

Light Echo and A Field Guide to Art, runs until Oct. 17. Consult the McMaster Museum of Art website for related talks and events, www.mcmaster.ca/museum .

Exhibitions blur boundaries of science, art

News Oct 02, 2009 Ancaster News

Dianne Bos, a one-time Dundas resident and graduate of Parkside Secondary School, currently divides her time between the foothills of the Rockies and the Pyrenees, but has returned home temporarily to collaborate on and curate two new exhibitions at the McMaster Museum of Art.

Both exhibitions blur the boundaries between science and art.

For Light Echo, Ms. Bos collaborated with McMaster University astronomer Doug Welch, also a Dundas resident, on an ambitious installation.

Their goal is to give earthlings a second chance to view a centuries-old supernova. The exhibition will re-create both the twinkling night sky in Cassiopeia and a Dutch 17th century artist’s studio, complete with period paintings from McMaster’s permanent collection and other artifacts.

Exploring links between art and science, specifically optics, physiology, biology, geography and the scientific aesthetic, is the focus of A Field Guide to Observing Art.

“This is your chance to make your own observations in the field, and to think about what characteristics lead us to classify something as a work of art or as a document of science,” said Ms. Bos.

“Is it their markings, styles, habits and origins?”

Surrounding a central observation platform, complete with viewing telescopes and interpretive signs, are 32 works of art from the McMaster Museum of Art’s permanent collection by celebrated artists like Claude Monet, Naum Gabo, Andy Goldsworthy, Eadweard Muybridge, Micah Lexier, Richard Long, Arnaud Maggs and Bridget Riley.

“The important thing,” said Ms. Bos, “is to get out into the field and observe with fresh eyes.”

This exhibition raises the questions: Where does art end and science begin? Are artists and scientists truly different species of observers? How different are the representations they make, based on what they observe?

Ms. Bos’ art has been exhibited internationally in numerous group and solo exhibitions since 1981 and was featured in the nationally touring exhibitions Time and Space (University of Lethbridge Art Gallery) and Dark Matter: The Great War and Fading Memory (Confederation Centre of the Arts).

Ms. Bos’ photographic work has appeared in a number of international publications. Her garden photography and writing have been published in Canadian, American and Japanese magazines. In 2005 she was awarded the National Magazine Gold Medal Award for a series on the adventures of medieval house buying in France.

Light Echo and A Field Guide to Art, runs until Oct. 17. Consult the McMaster Museum of Art website for related talks and events, www.mcmaster.ca/museum .

Exhibitions blur boundaries of science, art

News Oct 02, 2009 Ancaster News

Dianne Bos, a one-time Dundas resident and graduate of Parkside Secondary School, currently divides her time between the foothills of the Rockies and the Pyrenees, but has returned home temporarily to collaborate on and curate two new exhibitions at the McMaster Museum of Art.

Both exhibitions blur the boundaries between science and art.

For Light Echo, Ms. Bos collaborated with McMaster University astronomer Doug Welch, also a Dundas resident, on an ambitious installation.

Their goal is to give earthlings a second chance to view a centuries-old supernova. The exhibition will re-create both the twinkling night sky in Cassiopeia and a Dutch 17th century artist’s studio, complete with period paintings from McMaster’s permanent collection and other artifacts.

Exploring links between art and science, specifically optics, physiology, biology, geography and the scientific aesthetic, is the focus of A Field Guide to Observing Art.

“This is your chance to make your own observations in the field, and to think about what characteristics lead us to classify something as a work of art or as a document of science,” said Ms. Bos.

“Is it their markings, styles, habits and origins?”

Surrounding a central observation platform, complete with viewing telescopes and interpretive signs, are 32 works of art from the McMaster Museum of Art’s permanent collection by celebrated artists like Claude Monet, Naum Gabo, Andy Goldsworthy, Eadweard Muybridge, Micah Lexier, Richard Long, Arnaud Maggs and Bridget Riley.

“The important thing,” said Ms. Bos, “is to get out into the field and observe with fresh eyes.”

This exhibition raises the questions: Where does art end and science begin? Are artists and scientists truly different species of observers? How different are the representations they make, based on what they observe?

Ms. Bos’ art has been exhibited internationally in numerous group and solo exhibitions since 1981 and was featured in the nationally touring exhibitions Time and Space (University of Lethbridge Art Gallery) and Dark Matter: The Great War and Fading Memory (Confederation Centre of the Arts).

Ms. Bos’ photographic work has appeared in a number of international publications. Her garden photography and writing have been published in Canadian, American and Japanese magazines. In 2005 she was awarded the National Magazine Gold Medal Award for a series on the adventures of medieval house buying in France.

Light Echo and A Field Guide to Art, runs until Oct. 17. Consult the McMaster Museum of Art website for related talks and events, www.mcmaster.ca/museum .