City looking to reach out to NHL

News Oct 01, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead had some sober second thoughts about getting the federal government to investigate the NHL over it’s denial of Canadian billionaire Jim Balsillie’s attempts to purchase the Phoenix Coyotes.Coun. Whitehead, chair of the city’s NHL sub-committee and the Ward 8 rep, was prepared to introduce a motion at council’s Sept. 30 meeting asking the federal government establish an all-party committee over how the NHL has treated Mr. Balsillie as he tried to buy the financially-strapped Coyotes. His $242.5 million bid was denied Sept. 30 by an Arizona bankruptcy judge. Mr. Balsillie stated he will not appeal the decision.“I don’t think (the motion) would be helpful now,” said Coun. Whitehead. “It’s better to sit on this motion rather than put it forward.”Mr. Whitehead said the motion had been considered “more of a salvo” in the ongoing court battle in Arizona. But Mr. Whitehead changed his mind once Judge Redfield Baum made his decision known about Hamilton’s NHL prospects prior to the council meeting.Mr. Whitehead, who helped to create the NHL sub-committee in 2003, said in the wake of Judge Baum’s rejection of Mr. Balsillie’s bid for the Coyotes, Hamilton’s strategy should be “to reach out” to the NHL, including commissioner Gary Bettman, and see how the city can secure a future NHL team.“We need to find out what as a city we can do,” said Coun. Whitehead.Mayor Fred Eisenberger said Hamilton remains in a prime position to secure a NHL team either through expansion or relocating a failing team.“We need to look at other options,” he said. “We have had discussions (with representatives about possible NHL teams). We are in a fabulous position.”The mayor refused to reveal what those discussions involved.Mayor Eisenberger was expected to talk to Mr. Balsillie Oct. 1.Coun. Whitehead applauded the Canadian billionaire’s attempt to purchase the Coyotes. He said it has proved Hamilton is a viable area that can sustain an NHL franchise.“It has put us on the map,” he said. “There is a strong market in Hamilton for hockey. If a team was in Hamilton, it would be the NHL’s fifth most valuable franchise. It gives us a reason to pursue a team.”

City looking to reach out to NHL

News Oct 01, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead had some sober second thoughts about getting the federal government to investigate the NHL over it’s denial of Canadian billionaire Jim Balsillie’s attempts to purchase the Phoenix Coyotes.Coun. Whitehead, chair of the city’s NHL sub-committee and the Ward 8 rep, was prepared to introduce a motion at council’s Sept. 30 meeting asking the federal government establish an all-party committee over how the NHL has treated Mr. Balsillie as he tried to buy the financially-strapped Coyotes. His $242.5 million bid was denied Sept. 30 by an Arizona bankruptcy judge. Mr. Balsillie stated he will not appeal the decision.“I don’t think (the motion) would be helpful now,” said Coun. Whitehead. “It’s better to sit on this motion rather than put it forward.”Mr. Whitehead said the motion had been considered “more of a salvo” in the ongoing court battle in Arizona. But Mr. Whitehead changed his mind once Judge Redfield Baum made his decision known about Hamilton’s NHL prospects prior to the council meeting.Mr. Whitehead, who helped to create the NHL sub-committee in 2003, said in the wake of Judge Baum’s rejection of Mr. Balsillie’s bid for the Coyotes, Hamilton’s strategy should be “to reach out” to the NHL, including commissioner Gary Bettman, and see how the city can secure a future NHL team.“We need to find out what as a city we can do,” said Coun. Whitehead.Mayor Fred Eisenberger said Hamilton remains in a prime position to secure a NHL team either through expansion or relocating a failing team.“We need to look at other options,” he said. “We have had discussions (with representatives about possible NHL teams). We are in a fabulous position.”The mayor refused to reveal what those discussions involved.Mayor Eisenberger was expected to talk to Mr. Balsillie Oct. 1.Coun. Whitehead applauded the Canadian billionaire’s attempt to purchase the Coyotes. He said it has proved Hamilton is a viable area that can sustain an NHL franchise.“It has put us on the map,” he said. “There is a strong market in Hamilton for hockey. If a team was in Hamilton, it would be the NHL’s fifth most valuable franchise. It gives us a reason to pursue a team.”

City looking to reach out to NHL

News Oct 01, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton Mountain councillor Terry Whitehead had some sober second thoughts about getting the federal government to investigate the NHL over it’s denial of Canadian billionaire Jim Balsillie’s attempts to purchase the Phoenix Coyotes.Coun. Whitehead, chair of the city’s NHL sub-committee and the Ward 8 rep, was prepared to introduce a motion at council’s Sept. 30 meeting asking the federal government establish an all-party committee over how the NHL has treated Mr. Balsillie as he tried to buy the financially-strapped Coyotes. His $242.5 million bid was denied Sept. 30 by an Arizona bankruptcy judge. Mr. Balsillie stated he will not appeal the decision.“I don’t think (the motion) would be helpful now,” said Coun. Whitehead. “It’s better to sit on this motion rather than put it forward.”Mr. Whitehead said the motion had been considered “more of a salvo” in the ongoing court battle in Arizona. But Mr. Whitehead changed his mind once Judge Redfield Baum made his decision known about Hamilton’s NHL prospects prior to the council meeting.Mr. Whitehead, who helped to create the NHL sub-committee in 2003, said in the wake of Judge Baum’s rejection of Mr. Balsillie’s bid for the Coyotes, Hamilton’s strategy should be “to reach out” to the NHL, including commissioner Gary Bettman, and see how the city can secure a future NHL team.“We need to find out what as a city we can do,” said Coun. Whitehead.Mayor Fred Eisenberger said Hamilton remains in a prime position to secure a NHL team either through expansion or relocating a failing team.“We need to look at other options,” he said. “We have had discussions (with representatives about possible NHL teams). We are in a fabulous position.”The mayor refused to reveal what those discussions involved.Mayor Eisenberger was expected to talk to Mr. Balsillie Oct. 1.Coun. Whitehead applauded the Canadian billionaire’s attempt to purchase the Coyotes. He said it has proved Hamilton is a viable area that can sustain an NHL franchise.“It has put us on the map,” he said. “There is a strong market in Hamilton for hockey. If a team was in Hamilton, it would be the NHL’s fifth most valuable franchise. It gives us a reason to pursue a team.”