Move historic home or allow its demolition?

News Oct 02, 2009 Ancaster News

A champion for the Ancaster village core hopes to add even more nostalgia to the historic shopping district.

Bob Wilkins, chair of the Ancaster Heritage Village BIA, hopes to move the 1855 Andrew Sloss house from a rural Carluke setting to the site of the former post office at 385 Wilson St. E. Last week Mr. Wilkins told the city’s heritage committee he will examine the feasibility of moving the historic home to the village core.

Zoned as Village Area, the Wilson Street East site would permit a variety of commercial uses.

But if a successful relocation can’t be arranged, Mr. Wilkins said the owner should be permitted to demolish the historic stone cottage rather than spend up to $300,000 to repair it.

Terribly onerous

“If I can’t come up with a way of saving it, it would be terribly onerous,” Mr. Wilkins told the heritage committee.

The former Ancaster post office was closed in late August after Canada Post opened its new West Hamilton letter carrier depot in the Ancaster Business Park.

The former post office is now listed for sale at $900,000.

Mr. Wilkins has already spearheaded the redevelopment of several village core commercial buildings including the Ancaster Carriage Works and Coach House Hotel.

In a presentation to the heritage committee, Mr. Wilkins spoke on behalf of property owner Klaas Klaver.

Mr. Klaver, who purchased the Sloss house more than 30 years ago, is willing to sell the home to Mr. Wilkins for $1 to permit its relocation from 372 Butter Rd. W. to the village core.

Mr. Wilkins said portions of the building must be rebuilt, including wooden joists in the ground.

“It was a tough candidate (for preservation),” Mr. Wilkins said. “It was tough when he bought it.”

The home is set back several metres from Butter Road and can’t be seen from the roadway.

“Nobody can see it if you fix it,” Mr. Wilkins said.

By moving the building to the village core and demolishing the former post office, Mr. Wilkins said the new lot could add a new commercial business with 35 parking spaces.

Heritage committee members were receptive to the plan at last week’s meeting.

“I like what I hear and if it can be done, let’s do it,” said chair Art French.

The Andrew Sloss house is included on the heritage committee’s list of endangered buildings and landscapes. It includes several architectural features deemed worthy of preservation, including the double door on the south façade and double-hung windows. Reference book Ancaster's Heritage, published by the Ancaster Township Historical Society, identifies Andrew Sloss as one of the first settlers of Carluke.

The house sits on lot 39, Concession 6. Mr. Sloss bought the property in 1842 and lived at the home until his death in 1863 at age 49.

In 1854 Mr. Sloss sold half an acre in the southwest corner for the creation of the Free Presbyterian Church.

The red-brick Knox Church was dismantled in 1898 but a cemetery remains today.

Move historic home or allow its demolition?

News Oct 02, 2009 Ancaster News

A champion for the Ancaster village core hopes to add even more nostalgia to the historic shopping district.

Bob Wilkins, chair of the Ancaster Heritage Village BIA, hopes to move the 1855 Andrew Sloss house from a rural Carluke setting to the site of the former post office at 385 Wilson St. E. Last week Mr. Wilkins told the city’s heritage committee he will examine the feasibility of moving the historic home to the village core.

Zoned as Village Area, the Wilson Street East site would permit a variety of commercial uses.

But if a successful relocation can’t be arranged, Mr. Wilkins said the owner should be permitted to demolish the historic stone cottage rather than spend up to $300,000 to repair it.

Terribly onerous

“If I can’t come up with a way of saving it, it would be terribly onerous,” Mr. Wilkins told the heritage committee.

The former Ancaster post office was closed in late August after Canada Post opened its new West Hamilton letter carrier depot in the Ancaster Business Park.

The former post office is now listed for sale at $900,000.

Mr. Wilkins has already spearheaded the redevelopment of several village core commercial buildings including the Ancaster Carriage Works and Coach House Hotel.

In a presentation to the heritage committee, Mr. Wilkins spoke on behalf of property owner Klaas Klaver.

Mr. Klaver, who purchased the Sloss house more than 30 years ago, is willing to sell the home to Mr. Wilkins for $1 to permit its relocation from 372 Butter Rd. W. to the village core.

Mr. Wilkins said portions of the building must be rebuilt, including wooden joists in the ground.

“It was a tough candidate (for preservation),” Mr. Wilkins said. “It was tough when he bought it.”

The home is set back several metres from Butter Road and can’t be seen from the roadway.

“Nobody can see it if you fix it,” Mr. Wilkins said.

By moving the building to the village core and demolishing the former post office, Mr. Wilkins said the new lot could add a new commercial business with 35 parking spaces.

Heritage committee members were receptive to the plan at last week’s meeting.

“I like what I hear and if it can be done, let’s do it,” said chair Art French.

The Andrew Sloss house is included on the heritage committee’s list of endangered buildings and landscapes. It includes several architectural features deemed worthy of preservation, including the double door on the south façade and double-hung windows. Reference book Ancaster's Heritage, published by the Ancaster Township Historical Society, identifies Andrew Sloss as one of the first settlers of Carluke.

The house sits on lot 39, Concession 6. Mr. Sloss bought the property in 1842 and lived at the home until his death in 1863 at age 49.

In 1854 Mr. Sloss sold half an acre in the southwest corner for the creation of the Free Presbyterian Church.

The red-brick Knox Church was dismantled in 1898 but a cemetery remains today.

Move historic home or allow its demolition?

News Oct 02, 2009 Ancaster News

A champion for the Ancaster village core hopes to add even more nostalgia to the historic shopping district.

Bob Wilkins, chair of the Ancaster Heritage Village BIA, hopes to move the 1855 Andrew Sloss house from a rural Carluke setting to the site of the former post office at 385 Wilson St. E. Last week Mr. Wilkins told the city’s heritage committee he will examine the feasibility of moving the historic home to the village core.

Zoned as Village Area, the Wilson Street East site would permit a variety of commercial uses.

But if a successful relocation can’t be arranged, Mr. Wilkins said the owner should be permitted to demolish the historic stone cottage rather than spend up to $300,000 to repair it.

Terribly onerous

“If I can’t come up with a way of saving it, it would be terribly onerous,” Mr. Wilkins told the heritage committee.

The former Ancaster post office was closed in late August after Canada Post opened its new West Hamilton letter carrier depot in the Ancaster Business Park.

The former post office is now listed for sale at $900,000.

Mr. Wilkins has already spearheaded the redevelopment of several village core commercial buildings including the Ancaster Carriage Works and Coach House Hotel.

In a presentation to the heritage committee, Mr. Wilkins spoke on behalf of property owner Klaas Klaver.

Mr. Klaver, who purchased the Sloss house more than 30 years ago, is willing to sell the home to Mr. Wilkins for $1 to permit its relocation from 372 Butter Rd. W. to the village core.

Mr. Wilkins said portions of the building must be rebuilt, including wooden joists in the ground.

“It was a tough candidate (for preservation),” Mr. Wilkins said. “It was tough when he bought it.”

The home is set back several metres from Butter Road and can’t be seen from the roadway.

“Nobody can see it if you fix it,” Mr. Wilkins said.

By moving the building to the village core and demolishing the former post office, Mr. Wilkins said the new lot could add a new commercial business with 35 parking spaces.

Heritage committee members were receptive to the plan at last week’s meeting.

“I like what I hear and if it can be done, let’s do it,” said chair Art French.

The Andrew Sloss house is included on the heritage committee’s list of endangered buildings and landscapes. It includes several architectural features deemed worthy of preservation, including the double door on the south façade and double-hung windows. Reference book Ancaster's Heritage, published by the Ancaster Township Historical Society, identifies Andrew Sloss as one of the first settlers of Carluke.

The house sits on lot 39, Concession 6. Mr. Sloss bought the property in 1842 and lived at the home until his death in 1863 at age 49.

In 1854 Mr. Sloss sold half an acre in the southwest corner for the creation of the Free Presbyterian Church.

The red-brick Knox Church was dismantled in 1898 but a cemetery remains today.