Battle of mice and man continues

News Oct 02, 2009 Ancaster News

Six snap traps, warfarin, and a metal house where the guests check in but can’t check out, I’ve got the full arsenal out in an effort to rid my garage of another nasty mice infestation.

It was obvious a few weeks back that I would be going back to war against the little furry critters when I saw all the little mouse droppings scattered on the shelves, work benches and garage floor.

Why, oh why do they want to fight with me? You’d think word would have gotten around in mice circles that my house was a killing field the last time a group of rodents decided to set up shop.

I must have nabbed at least 60 of them two years back. Every morning I would get out to the garage to find the clamp down over their dumb little heads.

Last winter, I lived mouse free. I fully expected the critters to try once again to make a home in my walls, but for some unknown reason, they stayed away. Maybe it was the smell of death lingering from the year before.

The last time I dared broach the subject of the battle between mice and man, I received a letter to the editor from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals).

The spokesperson from PETA chastised me for killing the mice, suggesting there were more humane ways to rid my home of the rodents, and adding that it was more than likely my own fault they selected my garage as a winter habitat.

Fair enough, but it’s the ‘ethical’ treatment I give to my dog that has led to easy access for mice to enter my garage in the first place. During the day, I leave my 16-year-old incontinent pooch in the garage so that she has access to the backyard. This leaves an opening for the mice to get inside.

What am I supposed to do? I guess the folks at PETA would have me quit my job and stay at home all day to care for my aged Kayla.

I’ve sealed up every hole I could find in the garage walls, and the exterior of the home, but mice can squeeze through a space no bigger than a dime. It’s a hopeless cause.

I can tell they’ve been creating some new homesteads in the wall. I’ve picked up a few pieces of mortar that have been pushed out from between the bricks. Or did they just mysteriously fall out?

I don’t give a mouse’s behind about finding humane ways to dispose of the unwanted guests.

It’s war, I tell you.

You should see how focused I get when a fly gets in my house. No matter what I’m doing, I’ll drop everything until the fly is dead.

The mice don’t stand a chance. First I put out the warfarin. So far, the mice have munched on two plates of the supposed poison. I don’t know if they scurry off and die. There is no physical evidence.

That’s why I like traps. Snap, crack, dispose. Snap, crack, dispose.

It’s a quick death. Not like glue traps, where the mice die a slow death. I’m too sensitive to put them through that.

But if I don’t get them soon, they’ll overrun my home.

Mice can be harmful rodents. They can cause structural damages, start electrical fires and spread diseases through their parasites and feces. In North America, breathing dust that has come in contact with mouse excrement has been linked to hantavirus, which may lead to Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS).

And they are proliferate breeders. One mice couple can spawn upwards of 100 pups.

That’s a lot of mice, and a lot of mice droppings.

I will be victorious in this war, just like the last time the rodent army invaded my territory. I’m no genius, but I’m pretty sure I’m smarter than the average mouse. And, I’ve got a strong will to win. Let the battle commence.

Battle of mice and man continues

News Oct 02, 2009 Ancaster News

Six snap traps, warfarin, and a metal house where the guests check in but can’t check out, I’ve got the full arsenal out in an effort to rid my garage of another nasty mice infestation.

It was obvious a few weeks back that I would be going back to war against the little furry critters when I saw all the little mouse droppings scattered on the shelves, work benches and garage floor.

Why, oh why do they want to fight with me? You’d think word would have gotten around in mice circles that my house was a killing field the last time a group of rodents decided to set up shop.

I must have nabbed at least 60 of them two years back. Every morning I would get out to the garage to find the clamp down over their dumb little heads.

Last winter, I lived mouse free. I fully expected the critters to try once again to make a home in my walls, but for some unknown reason, they stayed away. Maybe it was the smell of death lingering from the year before.

The last time I dared broach the subject of the battle between mice and man, I received a letter to the editor from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals).

The spokesperson from PETA chastised me for killing the mice, suggesting there were more humane ways to rid my home of the rodents, and adding that it was more than likely my own fault they selected my garage as a winter habitat.

Fair enough, but it’s the ‘ethical’ treatment I give to my dog that has led to easy access for mice to enter my garage in the first place. During the day, I leave my 16-year-old incontinent pooch in the garage so that she has access to the backyard. This leaves an opening for the mice to get inside.

What am I supposed to do? I guess the folks at PETA would have me quit my job and stay at home all day to care for my aged Kayla.

I’ve sealed up every hole I could find in the garage walls, and the exterior of the home, but mice can squeeze through a space no bigger than a dime. It’s a hopeless cause.

I can tell they’ve been creating some new homesteads in the wall. I’ve picked up a few pieces of mortar that have been pushed out from between the bricks. Or did they just mysteriously fall out?

I don’t give a mouse’s behind about finding humane ways to dispose of the unwanted guests.

It’s war, I tell you.

You should see how focused I get when a fly gets in my house. No matter what I’m doing, I’ll drop everything until the fly is dead.

The mice don’t stand a chance. First I put out the warfarin. So far, the mice have munched on two plates of the supposed poison. I don’t know if they scurry off and die. There is no physical evidence.

That’s why I like traps. Snap, crack, dispose. Snap, crack, dispose.

It’s a quick death. Not like glue traps, where the mice die a slow death. I’m too sensitive to put them through that.

But if I don’t get them soon, they’ll overrun my home.

Mice can be harmful rodents. They can cause structural damages, start electrical fires and spread diseases through their parasites and feces. In North America, breathing dust that has come in contact with mouse excrement has been linked to hantavirus, which may lead to Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS).

And they are proliferate breeders. One mice couple can spawn upwards of 100 pups.

That’s a lot of mice, and a lot of mice droppings.

I will be victorious in this war, just like the last time the rodent army invaded my territory. I’m no genius, but I’m pretty sure I’m smarter than the average mouse. And, I’ve got a strong will to win. Let the battle commence.

Battle of mice and man continues

News Oct 02, 2009 Ancaster News

Six snap traps, warfarin, and a metal house where the guests check in but can’t check out, I’ve got the full arsenal out in an effort to rid my garage of another nasty mice infestation.

It was obvious a few weeks back that I would be going back to war against the little furry critters when I saw all the little mouse droppings scattered on the shelves, work benches and garage floor.

Why, oh why do they want to fight with me? You’d think word would have gotten around in mice circles that my house was a killing field the last time a group of rodents decided to set up shop.

I must have nabbed at least 60 of them two years back. Every morning I would get out to the garage to find the clamp down over their dumb little heads.

Last winter, I lived mouse free. I fully expected the critters to try once again to make a home in my walls, but for some unknown reason, they stayed away. Maybe it was the smell of death lingering from the year before.

The last time I dared broach the subject of the battle between mice and man, I received a letter to the editor from PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals).

The spokesperson from PETA chastised me for killing the mice, suggesting there were more humane ways to rid my home of the rodents, and adding that it was more than likely my own fault they selected my garage as a winter habitat.

Fair enough, but it’s the ‘ethical’ treatment I give to my dog that has led to easy access for mice to enter my garage in the first place. During the day, I leave my 16-year-old incontinent pooch in the garage so that she has access to the backyard. This leaves an opening for the mice to get inside.

What am I supposed to do? I guess the folks at PETA would have me quit my job and stay at home all day to care for my aged Kayla.

I’ve sealed up every hole I could find in the garage walls, and the exterior of the home, but mice can squeeze through a space no bigger than a dime. It’s a hopeless cause.

I can tell they’ve been creating some new homesteads in the wall. I’ve picked up a few pieces of mortar that have been pushed out from between the bricks. Or did they just mysteriously fall out?

I don’t give a mouse’s behind about finding humane ways to dispose of the unwanted guests.

It’s war, I tell you.

You should see how focused I get when a fly gets in my house. No matter what I’m doing, I’ll drop everything until the fly is dead.

The mice don’t stand a chance. First I put out the warfarin. So far, the mice have munched on two plates of the supposed poison. I don’t know if they scurry off and die. There is no physical evidence.

That’s why I like traps. Snap, crack, dispose. Snap, crack, dispose.

It’s a quick death. Not like glue traps, where the mice die a slow death. I’m too sensitive to put them through that.

But if I don’t get them soon, they’ll overrun my home.

Mice can be harmful rodents. They can cause structural damages, start electrical fires and spread diseases through their parasites and feces. In North America, breathing dust that has come in contact with mouse excrement has been linked to hantavirus, which may lead to Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS).

And they are proliferate breeders. One mice couple can spawn upwards of 100 pups.

That’s a lot of mice, and a lot of mice droppings.

I will be victorious in this war, just like the last time the rodent army invaded my territory. I’m no genius, but I’m pretty sure I’m smarter than the average mouse. And, I’ve got a strong will to win. Let the battle commence.