Hamilton Catholic students outshine provincial average on EQAO tests

News Sep 25, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton Catholic students continue to outshine their public and provincial counterparts on standardized tests in Grade 3, 6 and 9, the latest results from the Education Quality Accountability Office show.

The lone exception is in Grade 6 math, where the number of Catholic students who met the provincial standard fell two percentage points shy of the Ontario average of 63 per cent.

Yet this was still 10 percentage points higher than students at Hamilton public schools, who continued to lag behind the provincial average in every test despite big gains in Grade 6 reading and Grade 9 applied math.

Other than Grade 6 math, Catholic students exceeded the provincial average on every test, with 82 per cent of students meeting the standard on Grade 9 academic math. That’s five percentage points higher than the Ontario average and eight ahead of the city’s public school students.

For the public board, the results offered some encouraging signs as scores rose on nearly every test, with only Grade 3 reading dropping by one percentage point.

Test scores have also seen steady improvement over the past give years in most categories, with only Grade 6 math having dropped slightly.

Fifty-one per cent of the students met the latter standard – 12 percentage points below the provincial average.

John Malloy, the public board’s new education director, said he was pleased by the “dramatic gains” in Grade 9 applied math and Grade 6 reading, where scores improved by 10 and five percentage points, respectively.

“We know there is still work to do in other areas, but we are slowly starting to make some gains,” he said in a news release responding to the results.

“We continue to create an environment where all staff are learning together and working towards a culture where all students can succeed.”

Outstanding work

Catholic chair Pat Daly meanwhile welcomed his board’s results, calling the steady improvement “a testament to the outstanding work and dedication of our classroom teachers, principals, support staff and administration.”

As they have in the past, both elementary and secondary teacher unions criticized the tests, charging they don’t give parents a true picture of their child’s progress and waste time and money better spent elsewhere.

Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario president Sam Hammond said the multiple choice tests don’t accurately assess a student’s knowledge, skills or critical-thinking ability.

“A more realistic indicator is what happens on a daily basis in classrooms across Ontario,” he said in a release.

“Daily assessments by teachers can much more accurately evaluate what students have learned. Teachers know that good program decisions require many assessments.”

Hamilton Catholic students outshine provincial average on EQAO tests

News Sep 25, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton Catholic students continue to outshine their public and provincial counterparts on standardized tests in Grade 3, 6 and 9, the latest results from the Education Quality Accountability Office show.

The lone exception is in Grade 6 math, where the number of Catholic students who met the provincial standard fell two percentage points shy of the Ontario average of 63 per cent.

Yet this was still 10 percentage points higher than students at Hamilton public schools, who continued to lag behind the provincial average in every test despite big gains in Grade 6 reading and Grade 9 applied math.

Other than Grade 6 math, Catholic students exceeded the provincial average on every test, with 82 per cent of students meeting the standard on Grade 9 academic math. That’s five percentage points higher than the Ontario average and eight ahead of the city’s public school students.

For the public board, the results offered some encouraging signs as scores rose on nearly every test, with only Grade 3 reading dropping by one percentage point.

Test scores have also seen steady improvement over the past give years in most categories, with only Grade 6 math having dropped slightly.

Fifty-one per cent of the students met the latter standard – 12 percentage points below the provincial average.

John Malloy, the public board’s new education director, said he was pleased by the “dramatic gains” in Grade 9 applied math and Grade 6 reading, where scores improved by 10 and five percentage points, respectively.

“We know there is still work to do in other areas, but we are slowly starting to make some gains,” he said in a news release responding to the results.

“We continue to create an environment where all staff are learning together and working towards a culture where all students can succeed.”

Outstanding work

Catholic chair Pat Daly meanwhile welcomed his board’s results, calling the steady improvement “a testament to the outstanding work and dedication of our classroom teachers, principals, support staff and administration.”

As they have in the past, both elementary and secondary teacher unions criticized the tests, charging they don’t give parents a true picture of their child’s progress and waste time and money better spent elsewhere.

Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario president Sam Hammond said the multiple choice tests don’t accurately assess a student’s knowledge, skills or critical-thinking ability.

“A more realistic indicator is what happens on a daily basis in classrooms across Ontario,” he said in a release.

“Daily assessments by teachers can much more accurately evaluate what students have learned. Teachers know that good program decisions require many assessments.”

Hamilton Catholic students outshine provincial average on EQAO tests

News Sep 25, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton Catholic students continue to outshine their public and provincial counterparts on standardized tests in Grade 3, 6 and 9, the latest results from the Education Quality Accountability Office show.

The lone exception is in Grade 6 math, where the number of Catholic students who met the provincial standard fell two percentage points shy of the Ontario average of 63 per cent.

Yet this was still 10 percentage points higher than students at Hamilton public schools, who continued to lag behind the provincial average in every test despite big gains in Grade 6 reading and Grade 9 applied math.

Other than Grade 6 math, Catholic students exceeded the provincial average on every test, with 82 per cent of students meeting the standard on Grade 9 academic math. That’s five percentage points higher than the Ontario average and eight ahead of the city’s public school students.

For the public board, the results offered some encouraging signs as scores rose on nearly every test, with only Grade 3 reading dropping by one percentage point.

Test scores have also seen steady improvement over the past give years in most categories, with only Grade 6 math having dropped slightly.

Fifty-one per cent of the students met the latter standard – 12 percentage points below the provincial average.

John Malloy, the public board’s new education director, said he was pleased by the “dramatic gains” in Grade 9 applied math and Grade 6 reading, where scores improved by 10 and five percentage points, respectively.

“We know there is still work to do in other areas, but we are slowly starting to make some gains,” he said in a news release responding to the results.

“We continue to create an environment where all staff are learning together and working towards a culture where all students can succeed.”

Outstanding work

Catholic chair Pat Daly meanwhile welcomed his board’s results, calling the steady improvement “a testament to the outstanding work and dedication of our classroom teachers, principals, support staff and administration.”

As they have in the past, both elementary and secondary teacher unions criticized the tests, charging they don’t give parents a true picture of their child’s progress and waste time and money better spent elsewhere.

Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario president Sam Hammond said the multiple choice tests don’t accurately assess a student’s knowledge, skills or critical-thinking ability.

“A more realistic indicator is what happens on a daily basis in classrooms across Ontario,” he said in a release.

“Daily assessments by teachers can much more accurately evaluate what students have learned. Teachers know that good program decisions require many assessments.”