Woodworker carves niche for studio tour

News Sep 25, 2009 Ancaster News

New to the Dundas Studio Tour for 2009 is marquetry artist and woodworker David Atkinson, who will show his work at the Hillcrest Avenue studio of textile artist Lorraine Roy and photographer Janusz Wrobel.

Mr. Atkinson creates unique and unusual functional art, specializing in bent wood, laminated veneer and marquetry boxes, bowl, trays, clocks and wall hangings. He also builds custom electric guitars and basses.

“To be able to work with wood is a wonderful gift,” said Mr. Atkinson. “It is something not just serviceable but also alive, vibrant, even sensuous. Personality and spirit are present in every fibre. It is because of this inherent vitality that I strive to honour the wood in all the work to which I set my mind, hand and soul.”

Mr. Atkinson’s current work makes use of bending wood, veneer lamination, and marquetry, and whether it is one-of-a-kind or a short series run, it is given individual focused attention from conception and design to the final swipe of the polishing cloth. Each piece is numbered, dated and signed.

Inspiration

The technique of veneered marquetry had its inspiration in 16th century Florence and Naples, and was introduced to London furniture at the Restoration of Charles II in 1660.

Mr. Atkinson’s work has been shown both nationally and internationally, and has also appeared in Canadian Workshop Magazine and A Treasury of Canadian Craft. Currently, his work can be found at the Barber Gallery and in Guelph, the Guild Shop in Toronto, the Canadian Guild of Craft in Montreal, Quebec, the Davis Gallery in Stratford, the Meta4 Gallery in Port Perry, the Snapdragon Gallery in Ottawa and the Winnipeg Art Gallery in Winnipeg, Man.

The Dundas Studio Tour runs Oct. 3 and 4 from 11 a. m. to 5 p. m. daily. Also featured at the Hillcrest Avenue studio will be potter Louise McCann, steel sculpture artist Jean Pierre Schoss and Wendy Durfey, contemporary basket artist.

The theme for the 2009 Dundas Studio Tour is Back to Our Roots, with each studio featuring recipes, food, table decorating and home entertaining ideas. There are 25 artists and six studio locations, including an exciting new historic studio location — the Dundas Museum’s Doctor’s Office. The building was constructed in 1848 in the vernacular Gothic Revival style, at 85 King St. W., Dundas, just west of Sydenham Street. Many recall it most recently as “Dr. Bates' Office.”

Admission to the tour is free and each studio offers a draw for a special prize. For more information, call 905-379-7353 or visit www.dundasstudiotour.ca .

Woodworker carves niche for studio tour

News Sep 25, 2009 Ancaster News

New to the Dundas Studio Tour for 2009 is marquetry artist and woodworker David Atkinson, who will show his work at the Hillcrest Avenue studio of textile artist Lorraine Roy and photographer Janusz Wrobel.

Mr. Atkinson creates unique and unusual functional art, specializing in bent wood, laminated veneer and marquetry boxes, bowl, trays, clocks and wall hangings. He also builds custom electric guitars and basses.

“To be able to work with wood is a wonderful gift,” said Mr. Atkinson. “It is something not just serviceable but also alive, vibrant, even sensuous. Personality and spirit are present in every fibre. It is because of this inherent vitality that I strive to honour the wood in all the work to which I set my mind, hand and soul.”

Mr. Atkinson’s current work makes use of bending wood, veneer lamination, and marquetry, and whether it is one-of-a-kind or a short series run, it is given individual focused attention from conception and design to the final swipe of the polishing cloth. Each piece is numbered, dated and signed.

Inspiration

The technique of veneered marquetry had its inspiration in 16th century Florence and Naples, and was introduced to London furniture at the Restoration of Charles II in 1660.

Mr. Atkinson’s work has been shown both nationally and internationally, and has also appeared in Canadian Workshop Magazine and A Treasury of Canadian Craft. Currently, his work can be found at the Barber Gallery and in Guelph, the Guild Shop in Toronto, the Canadian Guild of Craft in Montreal, Quebec, the Davis Gallery in Stratford, the Meta4 Gallery in Port Perry, the Snapdragon Gallery in Ottawa and the Winnipeg Art Gallery in Winnipeg, Man.

The Dundas Studio Tour runs Oct. 3 and 4 from 11 a. m. to 5 p. m. daily. Also featured at the Hillcrest Avenue studio will be potter Louise McCann, steel sculpture artist Jean Pierre Schoss and Wendy Durfey, contemporary basket artist.

The theme for the 2009 Dundas Studio Tour is Back to Our Roots, with each studio featuring recipes, food, table decorating and home entertaining ideas. There are 25 artists and six studio locations, including an exciting new historic studio location — the Dundas Museum’s Doctor’s Office. The building was constructed in 1848 in the vernacular Gothic Revival style, at 85 King St. W., Dundas, just west of Sydenham Street. Many recall it most recently as “Dr. Bates' Office.”

Admission to the tour is free and each studio offers a draw for a special prize. For more information, call 905-379-7353 or visit www.dundasstudiotour.ca .

Woodworker carves niche for studio tour

News Sep 25, 2009 Ancaster News

New to the Dundas Studio Tour for 2009 is marquetry artist and woodworker David Atkinson, who will show his work at the Hillcrest Avenue studio of textile artist Lorraine Roy and photographer Janusz Wrobel.

Mr. Atkinson creates unique and unusual functional art, specializing in bent wood, laminated veneer and marquetry boxes, bowl, trays, clocks and wall hangings. He also builds custom electric guitars and basses.

“To be able to work with wood is a wonderful gift,” said Mr. Atkinson. “It is something not just serviceable but also alive, vibrant, even sensuous. Personality and spirit are present in every fibre. It is because of this inherent vitality that I strive to honour the wood in all the work to which I set my mind, hand and soul.”

Mr. Atkinson’s current work makes use of bending wood, veneer lamination, and marquetry, and whether it is one-of-a-kind or a short series run, it is given individual focused attention from conception and design to the final swipe of the polishing cloth. Each piece is numbered, dated and signed.

Inspiration

The technique of veneered marquetry had its inspiration in 16th century Florence and Naples, and was introduced to London furniture at the Restoration of Charles II in 1660.

Mr. Atkinson’s work has been shown both nationally and internationally, and has also appeared in Canadian Workshop Magazine and A Treasury of Canadian Craft. Currently, his work can be found at the Barber Gallery and in Guelph, the Guild Shop in Toronto, the Canadian Guild of Craft in Montreal, Quebec, the Davis Gallery in Stratford, the Meta4 Gallery in Port Perry, the Snapdragon Gallery in Ottawa and the Winnipeg Art Gallery in Winnipeg, Man.

The Dundas Studio Tour runs Oct. 3 and 4 from 11 a. m. to 5 p. m. daily. Also featured at the Hillcrest Avenue studio will be potter Louise McCann, steel sculpture artist Jean Pierre Schoss and Wendy Durfey, contemporary basket artist.

The theme for the 2009 Dundas Studio Tour is Back to Our Roots, with each studio featuring recipes, food, table decorating and home entertaining ideas. There are 25 artists and six studio locations, including an exciting new historic studio location — the Dundas Museum’s Doctor’s Office. The building was constructed in 1848 in the vernacular Gothic Revival style, at 85 King St. W., Dundas, just west of Sydenham Street. Many recall it most recently as “Dr. Bates' Office.”

Admission to the tour is free and each studio offers a draw for a special prize. For more information, call 905-379-7353 or visit www.dundasstudiotour.ca .