Dog waste is becoming problem for urban areas

News Sep 25, 2009 Ancaster News

Plan to be surprised is my motto. The kids made their buses and it looked like a great day ahead. My neighbour left my morning surprise at the end of my driveway.

There it was, as big as life, another load of poop on the edge of our lawn. The flies were having a feast. It couldn't have been more than an hour old.

How can any educated person feel that its beneath them to scoop their dog’s poop? I can understand that they may not be able to read the bylaw sign a mere 15 feet away; however, it is clearly illustrated to scoop the poop. Why must I and many of our other neighbours have to deal with this selfish act?

The Guelph humane society has posted some feces facts that our neighbour should know. Written by staff members Jenn Pratt and Elizabeth Bonkink, the article is entitled The Scoop on Poop: Reasons Why You Should Stoop and Scoop. The reasons are very scary.

1. Health Factors. A dog’s waste can expose humans to some pretty nasty conditions, including adenovirus, parvovirus, giardia, roundworm, whipworm, tapeworm, hookworm and coccidia. Children, especially, are susceptible to these diseases. Additionally, dog feces attract flies and other unwanted pests. Not to mention, it makes walking hazardous — who would want to slip in a pile and injure themselves?

2. Environmental Hazard: Spring run-off or heavy rainstorms dilute dog waste and wash it into streams and sewers. The dog waste contributes to the bacterial content of rivers, polluting parks and waterways, and degrading the natural environment for fish, wildlife and people.

As society strives to be “green,” dog waste is quickly becoming a large problem for urban centres. Toronto has initiated a “take it home” policy. In the summer of 2006 officials found that 23 to 27 per cent of all the waste in their parks is dog waste. It quickly piles up, filling both garbage cans and landfills.

3. Responsibility: If we all clean up after our dogs, public opinion of dogs and dog ownership would be much more positive.

When you stoop and scoop, the sidewalks, parks and green spaces are much cleaner and therefore nicer for everyone to enjoy. Think of it as a health monitor for your dog. It allows you to detect if there is anything suspicious (off-colour, foreign materials, diarrhea, blood or mucus) that should be reported to your vet.

4. Effects on other pets: Parasites and some other viruses are transmitted from pet to pet through fecal matter. Your dog could contract something as serious as parvovirus or many different internal parasites from another dog’s mess.

If everyone cleans up after their pets, the spread of these organisms would be much less prevalent.

J. Perry, Ancaster

Dog waste is becoming problem for urban areas

News Sep 25, 2009 Ancaster News

Plan to be surprised is my motto. The kids made their buses and it looked like a great day ahead. My neighbour left my morning surprise at the end of my driveway.

There it was, as big as life, another load of poop on the edge of our lawn. The flies were having a feast. It couldn't have been more than an hour old.

How can any educated person feel that its beneath them to scoop their dog’s poop? I can understand that they may not be able to read the bylaw sign a mere 15 feet away; however, it is clearly illustrated to scoop the poop. Why must I and many of our other neighbours have to deal with this selfish act?

The Guelph humane society has posted some feces facts that our neighbour should know. Written by staff members Jenn Pratt and Elizabeth Bonkink, the article is entitled The Scoop on Poop: Reasons Why You Should Stoop and Scoop. The reasons are very scary.

1. Health Factors. A dog’s waste can expose humans to some pretty nasty conditions, including adenovirus, parvovirus, giardia, roundworm, whipworm, tapeworm, hookworm and coccidia. Children, especially, are susceptible to these diseases. Additionally, dog feces attract flies and other unwanted pests. Not to mention, it makes walking hazardous — who would want to slip in a pile and injure themselves?

2. Environmental Hazard: Spring run-off or heavy rainstorms dilute dog waste and wash it into streams and sewers. The dog waste contributes to the bacterial content of rivers, polluting parks and waterways, and degrading the natural environment for fish, wildlife and people.

As society strives to be “green,” dog waste is quickly becoming a large problem for urban centres. Toronto has initiated a “take it home” policy. In the summer of 2006 officials found that 23 to 27 per cent of all the waste in their parks is dog waste. It quickly piles up, filling both garbage cans and landfills.

3. Responsibility: If we all clean up after our dogs, public opinion of dogs and dog ownership would be much more positive.

When you stoop and scoop, the sidewalks, parks and green spaces are much cleaner and therefore nicer for everyone to enjoy. Think of it as a health monitor for your dog. It allows you to detect if there is anything suspicious (off-colour, foreign materials, diarrhea, blood or mucus) that should be reported to your vet.

4. Effects on other pets: Parasites and some other viruses are transmitted from pet to pet through fecal matter. Your dog could contract something as serious as parvovirus or many different internal parasites from another dog’s mess.

If everyone cleans up after their pets, the spread of these organisms would be much less prevalent.

J. Perry, Ancaster

Dog waste is becoming problem for urban areas

News Sep 25, 2009 Ancaster News

Plan to be surprised is my motto. The kids made their buses and it looked like a great day ahead. My neighbour left my morning surprise at the end of my driveway.

There it was, as big as life, another load of poop on the edge of our lawn. The flies were having a feast. It couldn't have been more than an hour old.

How can any educated person feel that its beneath them to scoop their dog’s poop? I can understand that they may not be able to read the bylaw sign a mere 15 feet away; however, it is clearly illustrated to scoop the poop. Why must I and many of our other neighbours have to deal with this selfish act?

The Guelph humane society has posted some feces facts that our neighbour should know. Written by staff members Jenn Pratt and Elizabeth Bonkink, the article is entitled The Scoop on Poop: Reasons Why You Should Stoop and Scoop. The reasons are very scary.

1. Health Factors. A dog’s waste can expose humans to some pretty nasty conditions, including adenovirus, parvovirus, giardia, roundworm, whipworm, tapeworm, hookworm and coccidia. Children, especially, are susceptible to these diseases. Additionally, dog feces attract flies and other unwanted pests. Not to mention, it makes walking hazardous — who would want to slip in a pile and injure themselves?

2. Environmental Hazard: Spring run-off or heavy rainstorms dilute dog waste and wash it into streams and sewers. The dog waste contributes to the bacterial content of rivers, polluting parks and waterways, and degrading the natural environment for fish, wildlife and people.

As society strives to be “green,” dog waste is quickly becoming a large problem for urban centres. Toronto has initiated a “take it home” policy. In the summer of 2006 officials found that 23 to 27 per cent of all the waste in their parks is dog waste. It quickly piles up, filling both garbage cans and landfills.

3. Responsibility: If we all clean up after our dogs, public opinion of dogs and dog ownership would be much more positive.

When you stoop and scoop, the sidewalks, parks and green spaces are much cleaner and therefore nicer for everyone to enjoy. Think of it as a health monitor for your dog. It allows you to detect if there is anything suspicious (off-colour, foreign materials, diarrhea, blood or mucus) that should be reported to your vet.

4. Effects on other pets: Parasites and some other viruses are transmitted from pet to pet through fecal matter. Your dog could contract something as serious as parvovirus or many different internal parasites from another dog’s mess.

If everyone cleans up after their pets, the spread of these organisms would be much less prevalent.

J. Perry, Ancaster