Blitz tries to keep baby secure

News Sep 25, 2009 Ancaster News

If you’ve got a child-restraint seat in your car, there’s a nine in 10 chance it’s either unsafe or not installed properly.

At least that’s the experience of the city’s car-seat inspection clinics, says Carol Fedoryshyn, a nurse with the public health department’s injury prevention program.

The most common errors include seats being too loose, in the wrong position, not angled properly, or past their safety-certification expiry date, she said.

These can be fatal mistakes because restraint seats cut the risk of death in an accident by more than 70 per cent, she added.

“Often it’s a lack of parental knowledge. It can also be not understanding the directions from the manufacturer,” Ms. Fedoryshyn said during a special enforcement and education blitz on Monday. “Sometimes it’s even a perceived discomfort of the child –so, for example, they feel that a rear-facing child would be happier when forward facing and watching the parents, or they feel that the harness straps are perhaps too tight and that’s why they loosen them.”

While Ms. Fedoryshyn and about a dozen other nurses used the blitz to educate parents on proper seat installation, Hamilton police were there to issue tickets.

Constable Wes Wilson said about five per cent of the 1,400 tickets he issues every year are for restraint seat violations, which carry a $110 fine and penalty of two demerit points on your driver’s licence.

By law, children who are under eight or weigh less than 36 kilograms (80 pounds) must use an age-appropriate seat, he said. Any seat involved in a collision must also be replaced, so parents should be cautious about buying a used one, he added.

Improperly secured seats are the most common problem, but some people don’t even make that effort.

“We’ve had on occasions, doing RIDE lanes, where a motorist has come through the RIDE lanes with a child still seated in the lap of a passenger in the front seat,” Const. Wilson said.

“That is still continuing to this day, with all the news and information that’s out there and available, and the ramifications of a child loose in a car during a collision. It’s going to suffer some significant injuries.”

Car seat inspections and help with installations can be arranged through community policing centres at Lime Ridge Mall and on Ottawa Street North. The city’s public health department also offers clinics. For more information, call 905-546-3550.

Blitz tries to keep baby secure

News Sep 25, 2009 Ancaster News

If you’ve got a child-restraint seat in your car, there’s a nine in 10 chance it’s either unsafe or not installed properly.

At least that’s the experience of the city’s car-seat inspection clinics, says Carol Fedoryshyn, a nurse with the public health department’s injury prevention program.

The most common errors include seats being too loose, in the wrong position, not angled properly, or past their safety-certification expiry date, she said.

These can be fatal mistakes because restraint seats cut the risk of death in an accident by more than 70 per cent, she added.

“Often it’s a lack of parental knowledge. It can also be not understanding the directions from the manufacturer,” Ms. Fedoryshyn said during a special enforcement and education blitz on Monday. “Sometimes it’s even a perceived discomfort of the child –so, for example, they feel that a rear-facing child would be happier when forward facing and watching the parents, or they feel that the harness straps are perhaps too tight and that’s why they loosen them.”

While Ms. Fedoryshyn and about a dozen other nurses used the blitz to educate parents on proper seat installation, Hamilton police were there to issue tickets.

Constable Wes Wilson said about five per cent of the 1,400 tickets he issues every year are for restraint seat violations, which carry a $110 fine and penalty of two demerit points on your driver’s licence.

By law, children who are under eight or weigh less than 36 kilograms (80 pounds) must use an age-appropriate seat, he said. Any seat involved in a collision must also be replaced, so parents should be cautious about buying a used one, he added.

Improperly secured seats are the most common problem, but some people don’t even make that effort.

“We’ve had on occasions, doing RIDE lanes, where a motorist has come through the RIDE lanes with a child still seated in the lap of a passenger in the front seat,” Const. Wilson said.

“That is still continuing to this day, with all the news and information that’s out there and available, and the ramifications of a child loose in a car during a collision. It’s going to suffer some significant injuries.”

Car seat inspections and help with installations can be arranged through community policing centres at Lime Ridge Mall and on Ottawa Street North. The city’s public health department also offers clinics. For more information, call 905-546-3550.

Blitz tries to keep baby secure

News Sep 25, 2009 Ancaster News

If you’ve got a child-restraint seat in your car, there’s a nine in 10 chance it’s either unsafe or not installed properly.

At least that’s the experience of the city’s car-seat inspection clinics, says Carol Fedoryshyn, a nurse with the public health department’s injury prevention program.

The most common errors include seats being too loose, in the wrong position, not angled properly, or past their safety-certification expiry date, she said.

These can be fatal mistakes because restraint seats cut the risk of death in an accident by more than 70 per cent, she added.

“Often it’s a lack of parental knowledge. It can also be not understanding the directions from the manufacturer,” Ms. Fedoryshyn said during a special enforcement and education blitz on Monday. “Sometimes it’s even a perceived discomfort of the child –so, for example, they feel that a rear-facing child would be happier when forward facing and watching the parents, or they feel that the harness straps are perhaps too tight and that’s why they loosen them.”

While Ms. Fedoryshyn and about a dozen other nurses used the blitz to educate parents on proper seat installation, Hamilton police were there to issue tickets.

Constable Wes Wilson said about five per cent of the 1,400 tickets he issues every year are for restraint seat violations, which carry a $110 fine and penalty of two demerit points on your driver’s licence.

By law, children who are under eight or weigh less than 36 kilograms (80 pounds) must use an age-appropriate seat, he said. Any seat involved in a collision must also be replaced, so parents should be cautious about buying a used one, he added.

Improperly secured seats are the most common problem, but some people don’t even make that effort.

“We’ve had on occasions, doing RIDE lanes, where a motorist has come through the RIDE lanes with a child still seated in the lap of a passenger in the front seat,” Const. Wilson said.

“That is still continuing to this day, with all the news and information that’s out there and available, and the ramifications of a child loose in a car during a collision. It’s going to suffer some significant injuries.”

Car seat inspections and help with installations can be arranged through community policing centres at Lime Ridge Mall and on Ottawa Street North. The city’s public health department also offers clinics. For more information, call 905-546-3550.