Ancaster Fair debuts at new location

News Sep 25, 2009 Ancaster News

After five years of planning, two years of construction and more than a century of dreaming, the big day is finally here for the Ancaster Fair.

The fair opens for the very first time at its new location at 630 Trinity Road this weekend, with new, more spacious amenities and a variety of debut events.

Ancaster Fair publicity coordinator Sylvia Parr is doing her part to promote the fair. Ms. Parr has designed an autumn themed fair display near her home, between Braithwaite Avenue and James Smith Park, just north of Garner Road, in a newly built subdivision.

As the fair looks back on a storied 159-year history, organizers hope to attract more newcomers, including those who have recently moved to Ancaster.

“That is definitely one of our biggest challenges,” Ms. Parr said, “making sure that people know that we’re here and that we’ve moved.”

Nothing is left at the former Garner Road fairgrounds except mounds of dirt and a Mattamy Homes model home showcasing the 325-unit development approved for the site.

The Trinity Road fairgrounds have already hosted some high profile events, including the Dodge Rodeo Tour and a Champagne and Carousels Gala. The main exhibition area, Marritt Hall, is now booked for every weekend of 2010, making it a hot spot for conferences and trade shows.

To make it easier for urban dwellers to attend this year’s fair, a special shuttle bus service is available from the HSR. Buses begin running hourly on Friday morning from the main loop in the Meadowlands at Martindale Crescent. The last bus leaves the fairgrounds at 10:30 p. m. on Friday and Saturday.

Bus service was recently approved by the city’s public works department.

“We really appreciate the city helping us out with this,” said Kathy Smith, secretary/treasurer and manager of the Ancaster Agricultural Society.

Among the new events at this year’s fair, guests can experience Bobcat square dancing before the Friday and Saturday evening demolition derbies.

Learn how to be a Locavore by eating locally grown, sustainable foods.

You can also visit the working steam engine at Heritage Square, threshing demonstrations, the Dukes of Hazard’s General Lee and the antique car show on Saturday or Sunday, Sept. 26 and 27.

Walk and talk with the animals at Old MacDonald’s Farm and take in blacksmith and sheep shearing demonstrations.

Take a birds eye view of the city with the Farmers Feed Cities Balloon Rides presented by Hyland Seeds.

The Friday and Saturday night demolition derbies offer more room for fans with landscaped berms and temporary seating.

Guests are invited to bring a blanket and find a seat on the berm for an optimum view of the event. Visit www.ancasterfair.ca for complete event listings.

The 2008 fair attracted more than 40,000 guests. This year, organizers hope another weekend of unseasonably warm weather coupled with a sense of curiosity will attract even more guests to Trinity Road.

The new fairgrounds feature better accessibility, with fully paved walkways and enough open space to park 5,000 vehicles. The main building, Marritt Hall, features 28,800 square feet of exhibition space with full kitchen facilities and in-floor heating.

The new, air conditioned concession building will help guests beat the heat while browsing displays and commercial exhibits. The fair also features a new show arena with a 24,000 square-foot show area.

Livestock exhibits are displayed in the Old MacDonald’s education building, which includes two U-shaped wings, one for educational displays and another for livestock exhibits. The fairgrounds also include three horse rings, each with a screening base.

The new fairgrounds include an expanded 113,000 square-foot midway and a 48,000 square-foot demolition derby pit.

Familiar events are set to return including the Saturday morning baby show, sheep shearing and cattle milking demonstrations and the annual demolition derby.

Ancaster Fair debuts at new location

News Sep 25, 2009 Ancaster News

After five years of planning, two years of construction and more than a century of dreaming, the big day is finally here for the Ancaster Fair.

The fair opens for the very first time at its new location at 630 Trinity Road this weekend, with new, more spacious amenities and a variety of debut events.

Ancaster Fair publicity coordinator Sylvia Parr is doing her part to promote the fair. Ms. Parr has designed an autumn themed fair display near her home, between Braithwaite Avenue and James Smith Park, just north of Garner Road, in a newly built subdivision.

As the fair looks back on a storied 159-year history, organizers hope to attract more newcomers, including those who have recently moved to Ancaster.

“That is definitely one of our biggest challenges,” Ms. Parr said, “making sure that people know that we’re here and that we’ve moved.”

Nothing is left at the former Garner Road fairgrounds except mounds of dirt and a Mattamy Homes model home showcasing the 325-unit development approved for the site.

The Trinity Road fairgrounds have already hosted some high profile events, including the Dodge Rodeo Tour and a Champagne and Carousels Gala. The main exhibition area, Marritt Hall, is now booked for every weekend of 2010, making it a hot spot for conferences and trade shows.

To make it easier for urban dwellers to attend this year’s fair, a special shuttle bus service is available from the HSR. Buses begin running hourly on Friday morning from the main loop in the Meadowlands at Martindale Crescent. The last bus leaves the fairgrounds at 10:30 p. m. on Friday and Saturday.

Bus service was recently approved by the city’s public works department.

“We really appreciate the city helping us out with this,” said Kathy Smith, secretary/treasurer and manager of the Ancaster Agricultural Society.

Among the new events at this year’s fair, guests can experience Bobcat square dancing before the Friday and Saturday evening demolition derbies.

Learn how to be a Locavore by eating locally grown, sustainable foods.

You can also visit the working steam engine at Heritage Square, threshing demonstrations, the Dukes of Hazard’s General Lee and the antique car show on Saturday or Sunday, Sept. 26 and 27.

Walk and talk with the animals at Old MacDonald’s Farm and take in blacksmith and sheep shearing demonstrations.

Take a birds eye view of the city with the Farmers Feed Cities Balloon Rides presented by Hyland Seeds.

The Friday and Saturday night demolition derbies offer more room for fans with landscaped berms and temporary seating.

Guests are invited to bring a blanket and find a seat on the berm for an optimum view of the event. Visit www.ancasterfair.ca for complete event listings.

The 2008 fair attracted more than 40,000 guests. This year, organizers hope another weekend of unseasonably warm weather coupled with a sense of curiosity will attract even more guests to Trinity Road.

The new fairgrounds feature better accessibility, with fully paved walkways and enough open space to park 5,000 vehicles. The main building, Marritt Hall, features 28,800 square feet of exhibition space with full kitchen facilities and in-floor heating.

The new, air conditioned concession building will help guests beat the heat while browsing displays and commercial exhibits. The fair also features a new show arena with a 24,000 square-foot show area.

Livestock exhibits are displayed in the Old MacDonald’s education building, which includes two U-shaped wings, one for educational displays and another for livestock exhibits. The fairgrounds also include three horse rings, each with a screening base.

The new fairgrounds include an expanded 113,000 square-foot midway and a 48,000 square-foot demolition derby pit.

Familiar events are set to return including the Saturday morning baby show, sheep shearing and cattle milking demonstrations and the annual demolition derby.

Ancaster Fair debuts at new location

News Sep 25, 2009 Ancaster News

After five years of planning, two years of construction and more than a century of dreaming, the big day is finally here for the Ancaster Fair.

The fair opens for the very first time at its new location at 630 Trinity Road this weekend, with new, more spacious amenities and a variety of debut events.

Ancaster Fair publicity coordinator Sylvia Parr is doing her part to promote the fair. Ms. Parr has designed an autumn themed fair display near her home, between Braithwaite Avenue and James Smith Park, just north of Garner Road, in a newly built subdivision.

As the fair looks back on a storied 159-year history, organizers hope to attract more newcomers, including those who have recently moved to Ancaster.

“That is definitely one of our biggest challenges,” Ms. Parr said, “making sure that people know that we’re here and that we’ve moved.”

Nothing is left at the former Garner Road fairgrounds except mounds of dirt and a Mattamy Homes model home showcasing the 325-unit development approved for the site.

The Trinity Road fairgrounds have already hosted some high profile events, including the Dodge Rodeo Tour and a Champagne and Carousels Gala. The main exhibition area, Marritt Hall, is now booked for every weekend of 2010, making it a hot spot for conferences and trade shows.

To make it easier for urban dwellers to attend this year’s fair, a special shuttle bus service is available from the HSR. Buses begin running hourly on Friday morning from the main loop in the Meadowlands at Martindale Crescent. The last bus leaves the fairgrounds at 10:30 p. m. on Friday and Saturday.

Bus service was recently approved by the city’s public works department.

“We really appreciate the city helping us out with this,” said Kathy Smith, secretary/treasurer and manager of the Ancaster Agricultural Society.

Among the new events at this year’s fair, guests can experience Bobcat square dancing before the Friday and Saturday evening demolition derbies.

Learn how to be a Locavore by eating locally grown, sustainable foods.

You can also visit the working steam engine at Heritage Square, threshing demonstrations, the Dukes of Hazard’s General Lee and the antique car show on Saturday or Sunday, Sept. 26 and 27.

Walk and talk with the animals at Old MacDonald’s Farm and take in blacksmith and sheep shearing demonstrations.

Take a birds eye view of the city with the Farmers Feed Cities Balloon Rides presented by Hyland Seeds.

The Friday and Saturday night demolition derbies offer more room for fans with landscaped berms and temporary seating.

Guests are invited to bring a blanket and find a seat on the berm for an optimum view of the event. Visit www.ancasterfair.ca for complete event listings.

The 2008 fair attracted more than 40,000 guests. This year, organizers hope another weekend of unseasonably warm weather coupled with a sense of curiosity will attract even more guests to Trinity Road.

The new fairgrounds feature better accessibility, with fully paved walkways and enough open space to park 5,000 vehicles. The main building, Marritt Hall, features 28,800 square feet of exhibition space with full kitchen facilities and in-floor heating.

The new, air conditioned concession building will help guests beat the heat while browsing displays and commercial exhibits. The fair also features a new show arena with a 24,000 square-foot show area.

Livestock exhibits are displayed in the Old MacDonald’s education building, which includes two U-shaped wings, one for educational displays and another for livestock exhibits. The fairgrounds also include three horse rings, each with a screening base.

The new fairgrounds include an expanded 113,000 square-foot midway and a 48,000 square-foot demolition derby pit.

Familiar events are set to return including the Saturday morning baby show, sheep shearing and cattle milking demonstrations and the annual demolition derby.