Catholic board adopts new sports code of conduct requiring parents to sign affidavit

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

“One man practicing sportsmanship is better than a hundred teaching it,” said Knute Rockne about his years as head coach of the Notre Dame football team.

Those words spoken almost a century ago captured in a nutshell the sentiment behind a professional development activity for 700 teacher-coaches of the Hamilton- Wentworth Catholic District School Board designed to “renew the Catholic spirit of sports.”

The session was a celebration of the many and varied contributions of teacher-coaches in the personal and spiritual development of student athletes throughout the history of the board.

“What passion, what energy,” said superintendent Mary Cipolla in responding to the lively crowd. “What a beautiful way to start the school year.”

“This day is in honour of you,” she continued. “It is our way, a small way, of saying thank you for your significant contributions to the lives of our student-athletes.”

The P. A. session has been a long time coming, said Mrs. Cipolla, noting a sports focus group was formed last spring, stemming from the vision of chairperson Patrick Daly and former director of education Marcel Castura, to examine the culture of sports in Hamilton- Wentworth Catholic schools.

“This initiative comes at an important time and calls upon all of us to reflect very seriously on the value of sport and the huge impact sport and teacher-coaches can make to the Catholic school environment,” said Mr. Daly. “You are the most crucial people in this renewal process.”

Touching briefly on the current state of sports in schools, co-chair of the sports focus group Jos Nederveen outlined a new code of conduct developed for coaches, athletes and players.

“There’s great interest in making sure everyone is on board and on the same page,” he said.

The code of conduct would require student-athletes and parents to sign an affidavit prior to participating on a team.

“By signing, it will help them to understand their individual responsibilities,” said Mr. Nederveen, adding the code is a huge step in teachers developing as coaches and reinforcing Catholic values in sport.

Adding some punch to the package was former teacher and coach Cecelia Carter-Smith who delivered the keynote address.

“We provide modelling for our kids,” she said. “We are single-handedly responsible for who they are and what they become.”

Drawing on her own personal coaching experiences, Ms Carter- Smith talked about the importance of developing respectful relationships with players as well as with referees.

“We create relationships with officials in the same way we do with our kids. I have never known a referee to come out onto the playing field with a pre-determined outcome.”

“They have a job to do and so do we,” she said, adding that she honed her own skills as a coach by watching how the referees interacted with the players.

“The question you have to ask yourself,” she told teacher-coaches, “is, ‘Would I want my son or daughter to play for you?’”

Talking about the sense of richness that she has experienced around her career, she noted the positive influence a coach can have in the life of a student, and the influence students can have on a coach.

Catholic board adopts new sports code of conduct requiring parents to sign affidavit

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

“One man practicing sportsmanship is better than a hundred teaching it,” said Knute Rockne about his years as head coach of the Notre Dame football team.

Those words spoken almost a century ago captured in a nutshell the sentiment behind a professional development activity for 700 teacher-coaches of the Hamilton- Wentworth Catholic District School Board designed to “renew the Catholic spirit of sports.”

The session was a celebration of the many and varied contributions of teacher-coaches in the personal and spiritual development of student athletes throughout the history of the board.

“What passion, what energy,” said superintendent Mary Cipolla in responding to the lively crowd. “What a beautiful way to start the school year.”

“This day is in honour of you,” she continued. “It is our way, a small way, of saying thank you for your significant contributions to the lives of our student-athletes.”

The P. A. session has been a long time coming, said Mrs. Cipolla, noting a sports focus group was formed last spring, stemming from the vision of chairperson Patrick Daly and former director of education Marcel Castura, to examine the culture of sports in Hamilton- Wentworth Catholic schools.

“This initiative comes at an important time and calls upon all of us to reflect very seriously on the value of sport and the huge impact sport and teacher-coaches can make to the Catholic school environment,” said Mr. Daly. “You are the most crucial people in this renewal process.”

Touching briefly on the current state of sports in schools, co-chair of the sports focus group Jos Nederveen outlined a new code of conduct developed for coaches, athletes and players.

“There’s great interest in making sure everyone is on board and on the same page,” he said.

The code of conduct would require student-athletes and parents to sign an affidavit prior to participating on a team.

“By signing, it will help them to understand their individual responsibilities,” said Mr. Nederveen, adding the code is a huge step in teachers developing as coaches and reinforcing Catholic values in sport.

Adding some punch to the package was former teacher and coach Cecelia Carter-Smith who delivered the keynote address.

“We provide modelling for our kids,” she said. “We are single-handedly responsible for who they are and what they become.”

Drawing on her own personal coaching experiences, Ms Carter- Smith talked about the importance of developing respectful relationships with players as well as with referees.

“We create relationships with officials in the same way we do with our kids. I have never known a referee to come out onto the playing field with a pre-determined outcome.”

“They have a job to do and so do we,” she said, adding that she honed her own skills as a coach by watching how the referees interacted with the players.

“The question you have to ask yourself,” she told teacher-coaches, “is, ‘Would I want my son or daughter to play for you?’”

Talking about the sense of richness that she has experienced around her career, she noted the positive influence a coach can have in the life of a student, and the influence students can have on a coach.

Catholic board adopts new sports code of conduct requiring parents to sign affidavit

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

“One man practicing sportsmanship is better than a hundred teaching it,” said Knute Rockne about his years as head coach of the Notre Dame football team.

Those words spoken almost a century ago captured in a nutshell the sentiment behind a professional development activity for 700 teacher-coaches of the Hamilton- Wentworth Catholic District School Board designed to “renew the Catholic spirit of sports.”

The session was a celebration of the many and varied contributions of teacher-coaches in the personal and spiritual development of student athletes throughout the history of the board.

“What passion, what energy,” said superintendent Mary Cipolla in responding to the lively crowd. “What a beautiful way to start the school year.”

“This day is in honour of you,” she continued. “It is our way, a small way, of saying thank you for your significant contributions to the lives of our student-athletes.”

The P. A. session has been a long time coming, said Mrs. Cipolla, noting a sports focus group was formed last spring, stemming from the vision of chairperson Patrick Daly and former director of education Marcel Castura, to examine the culture of sports in Hamilton- Wentworth Catholic schools.

“This initiative comes at an important time and calls upon all of us to reflect very seriously on the value of sport and the huge impact sport and teacher-coaches can make to the Catholic school environment,” said Mr. Daly. “You are the most crucial people in this renewal process.”

Touching briefly on the current state of sports in schools, co-chair of the sports focus group Jos Nederveen outlined a new code of conduct developed for coaches, athletes and players.

“There’s great interest in making sure everyone is on board and on the same page,” he said.

The code of conduct would require student-athletes and parents to sign an affidavit prior to participating on a team.

“By signing, it will help them to understand their individual responsibilities,” said Mr. Nederveen, adding the code is a huge step in teachers developing as coaches and reinforcing Catholic values in sport.

Adding some punch to the package was former teacher and coach Cecelia Carter-Smith who delivered the keynote address.

“We provide modelling for our kids,” she said. “We are single-handedly responsible for who they are and what they become.”

Drawing on her own personal coaching experiences, Ms Carter- Smith talked about the importance of developing respectful relationships with players as well as with referees.

“We create relationships with officials in the same way we do with our kids. I have never known a referee to come out onto the playing field with a pre-determined outcome.”

“They have a job to do and so do we,” she said, adding that she honed her own skills as a coach by watching how the referees interacted with the players.

“The question you have to ask yourself,” she told teacher-coaches, “is, ‘Would I want my son or daughter to play for you?’”

Talking about the sense of richness that she has experienced around her career, she noted the positive influence a coach can have in the life of a student, and the influence students can have on a coach.