City to kick in $1 million for Redeemer soccer facility

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton is making a pitch to help Redeemer University’s new indoor soccer facility.

Politicians are expected to review a proposal Sept. 23, that would give the university a $1 million interest-free loan, said Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson. The loan would be re-paid, said Mr. Ferguson, within five years. Redeemer University recently unveiled plans to construct a $4.8 million indoor soccer complex, which includes a domed artificial turf field with a fieldhouse, and refurbish the school’s existing outdoor artificial turf field.

“Our preference would be to have an interest-free loan,” said Bill van Staalduinen, vice-president of advancement. “The city had provided a letter of support for our application. But we did not know when the city would provide any funds.”

The provincial and federal governments have already committed a total of $2.6 million in recreation infrastructure funding for the project. Construction is scheduled to sometime this fall, depending upon when the university completes its preparations, said Mr. van Staalduinen. Part of the project could be finished by the end of the year, he said. But everything should be completed by next spring.

In addition to government funding, Mr. Ferguson said the area’s soccer associations will also begin a campaign to raise funds for the facility.

“This is one of the things we are pleased about,” said Mr. van Staalduinen. “It will be used by everybody.”

“This is a true joint venture,” added Mr. Ferguson. “It is a community investment and for community use.”

Redeemer officials have stated the fields will be available to the Ancaster Soccer Club evenings and weekends throughout the summer, as well as for both public and separate school boards.

It is the first time that all three levels of government have contributed funding to a private Christian school, an issue that has stirred up some controversy. Petitions for and against have sprung up in the Collingwood area after the provincial government gave the Pretty River Academy, a private school, about $500,000 for an athletic field.

In the 2007 provincial election, Premier Dalton McGuinty criticized the use of public money for private schools, saying it would harm schools outside urban areas.

Mr. van Staalduinen said he recently received a call from Collingwood resident Lorne Kennedy, who started an on-line petition against the provincial government providing the funds to Pretty River Academy, apologizing for dragging Redeemer University’s name into the media spotlight. Mr. van Staalduinen said Mr. Kennedy has promised not to use Redeemer as an example in his argument against the province funding private religious institutions.

City to kick in $1 million for Redeemer soccer facility

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton is making a pitch to help Redeemer University’s new indoor soccer facility.

Politicians are expected to review a proposal Sept. 23, that would give the university a $1 million interest-free loan, said Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson. The loan would be re-paid, said Mr. Ferguson, within five years. Redeemer University recently unveiled plans to construct a $4.8 million indoor soccer complex, which includes a domed artificial turf field with a fieldhouse, and refurbish the school’s existing outdoor artificial turf field.

“Our preference would be to have an interest-free loan,” said Bill van Staalduinen, vice-president of advancement. “The city had provided a letter of support for our application. But we did not know when the city would provide any funds.”

The provincial and federal governments have already committed a total of $2.6 million in recreation infrastructure funding for the project. Construction is scheduled to sometime this fall, depending upon when the university completes its preparations, said Mr. van Staalduinen. Part of the project could be finished by the end of the year, he said. But everything should be completed by next spring.

In addition to government funding, Mr. Ferguson said the area’s soccer associations will also begin a campaign to raise funds for the facility.

“This is one of the things we are pleased about,” said Mr. van Staalduinen. “It will be used by everybody.”

“This is a true joint venture,” added Mr. Ferguson. “It is a community investment and for community use.”

Redeemer officials have stated the fields will be available to the Ancaster Soccer Club evenings and weekends throughout the summer, as well as for both public and separate school boards.

It is the first time that all three levels of government have contributed funding to a private Christian school, an issue that has stirred up some controversy. Petitions for and against have sprung up in the Collingwood area after the provincial government gave the Pretty River Academy, a private school, about $500,000 for an athletic field.

In the 2007 provincial election, Premier Dalton McGuinty criticized the use of public money for private schools, saying it would harm schools outside urban areas.

Mr. van Staalduinen said he recently received a call from Collingwood resident Lorne Kennedy, who started an on-line petition against the provincial government providing the funds to Pretty River Academy, apologizing for dragging Redeemer University’s name into the media spotlight. Mr. van Staalduinen said Mr. Kennedy has promised not to use Redeemer as an example in his argument against the province funding private religious institutions.

City to kick in $1 million for Redeemer soccer facility

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

Hamilton is making a pitch to help Redeemer University’s new indoor soccer facility.

Politicians are expected to review a proposal Sept. 23, that would give the university a $1 million interest-free loan, said Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson. The loan would be re-paid, said Mr. Ferguson, within five years. Redeemer University recently unveiled plans to construct a $4.8 million indoor soccer complex, which includes a domed artificial turf field with a fieldhouse, and refurbish the school’s existing outdoor artificial turf field.

“Our preference would be to have an interest-free loan,” said Bill van Staalduinen, vice-president of advancement. “The city had provided a letter of support for our application. But we did not know when the city would provide any funds.”

The provincial and federal governments have already committed a total of $2.6 million in recreation infrastructure funding for the project. Construction is scheduled to sometime this fall, depending upon when the university completes its preparations, said Mr. van Staalduinen. Part of the project could be finished by the end of the year, he said. But everything should be completed by next spring.

In addition to government funding, Mr. Ferguson said the area’s soccer associations will also begin a campaign to raise funds for the facility.

“This is one of the things we are pleased about,” said Mr. van Staalduinen. “It will be used by everybody.”

“This is a true joint venture,” added Mr. Ferguson. “It is a community investment and for community use.”

Redeemer officials have stated the fields will be available to the Ancaster Soccer Club evenings and weekends throughout the summer, as well as for both public and separate school boards.

It is the first time that all three levels of government have contributed funding to a private Christian school, an issue that has stirred up some controversy. Petitions for and against have sprung up in the Collingwood area after the provincial government gave the Pretty River Academy, a private school, about $500,000 for an athletic field.

In the 2007 provincial election, Premier Dalton McGuinty criticized the use of public money for private schools, saying it would harm schools outside urban areas.

Mr. van Staalduinen said he recently received a call from Collingwood resident Lorne Kennedy, who started an on-line petition against the provincial government providing the funds to Pretty River Academy, apologizing for dragging Redeemer University’s name into the media spotlight. Mr. van Staalduinen said Mr. Kennedy has promised not to use Redeemer as an example in his argument against the province funding private religious institutions.