Backpackers still wear flag with pride

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

Bob Rae sent me a request that amused me, Faithful Reader. A picture of a backpack with a Canadian flag. “We used to wear it abroad with pride.” Yes we did. I understand we still do, although my backpacking days are over. I think. Perhaps? Maybe not.

I discovered on my travels if I met a fellow traveller with a Canadian flag backpack adornment (mine was also on my black sketch book cover), who when I sidled up with a “Hello Canuck” greeting, frequently responded with a hesitant, “Uh, well, ummm, I’m really an American, travelling incognito.” They were always charming and gracious. We frequently spent a few hours together. Secretly, Faithful Reader, several times I encountered gaggles of British school girls, always in unescorted clusters, of course, who were loud and out to attract attention.

I seldom met Canadians. Once, in Mexico, the woman who questioned me closely about my nationality narrowed it down to my shop in Campbellville. She had been a customer there, lived in Oakville. Small world. My mother admonished me to always behave. “No matter how far you travel, someone may know you.” Indeed.

By the way, Bob, I don’t really think we can lay a Canadian’s bad manners at Mr. Harper’s feet. Outside the home, we should perhaps place blame at the school door. We could also step back a few years and teach a little flag etiquette.

I am catching up on reading my magazine copies that are stacking up, and then slithering to the floor. The September copy of my current favourite magazine The Walrus has an excellent six-page article, On the Plains of Abraham, 1759. It is not quite six pages long because there are illustrations. The author, Helen Humphreys, credits D. Peter MacLeod’s book, Northern Armageddon, for her information. She calls her article a re-enactment. The history of that battle that changed the colours on the map is told as if by those on both sides who fought. How very sad the few paragraphs in my school history book and my only visit to the battlefield told so little, so uninterestingly.

In the voice of a British soldier comes the information that less than a quarter of the British forces is from England. American, Irish, and Scots. The narrator, a Highlander, says he fought against Cumberland and Wolfe in the battle at Culloden. I was stunned, F. R. I have read about that battle but somehow did not learn Wolfe fought in that bloody hell.

Humphreys uses the voices of those joined in this battle. Both generals were dead. The slaughter was appalling. The voice of Ellen Job, the only woman and a field nurse tended the body of General Wolfe. A testimony of nursing practices.

It rained for two days. This historic battle was fought in the rain and mud and cold, not for glory but through poverty and ignorance with little or no training. Expendable.

Patricia Peacock-Evans’ splendid watercoulour, pencil and ink drawings and Chris Hutcheson’s large format photographs are still appealing on my third visit.

The Carnegie Gallery, 10 King St. W. Dundas, www.carnegiegallery.org or 905-627-4265. Saturday evening Sept. 19, Suzie Vinnick entertains. Make an interesting two-fold visit.

Backpackers still wear flag with pride

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

Bob Rae sent me a request that amused me, Faithful Reader. A picture of a backpack with a Canadian flag. “We used to wear it abroad with pride.” Yes we did. I understand we still do, although my backpacking days are over. I think. Perhaps? Maybe not.

I discovered on my travels if I met a fellow traveller with a Canadian flag backpack adornment (mine was also on my black sketch book cover), who when I sidled up with a “Hello Canuck” greeting, frequently responded with a hesitant, “Uh, well, ummm, I’m really an American, travelling incognito.” They were always charming and gracious. We frequently spent a few hours together. Secretly, Faithful Reader, several times I encountered gaggles of British school girls, always in unescorted clusters, of course, who were loud and out to attract attention.

I seldom met Canadians. Once, in Mexico, the woman who questioned me closely about my nationality narrowed it down to my shop in Campbellville. She had been a customer there, lived in Oakville. Small world. My mother admonished me to always behave. “No matter how far you travel, someone may know you.” Indeed.

By the way, Bob, I don’t really think we can lay a Canadian’s bad manners at Mr. Harper’s feet. Outside the home, we should perhaps place blame at the school door. We could also step back a few years and teach a little flag etiquette.

I am catching up on reading my magazine copies that are stacking up, and then slithering to the floor. The September copy of my current favourite magazine The Walrus has an excellent six-page article, On the Plains of Abraham, 1759. It is not quite six pages long because there are illustrations. The author, Helen Humphreys, credits D. Peter MacLeod’s book, Northern Armageddon, for her information. She calls her article a re-enactment. The history of that battle that changed the colours on the map is told as if by those on both sides who fought. How very sad the few paragraphs in my school history book and my only visit to the battlefield told so little, so uninterestingly.

In the voice of a British soldier comes the information that less than a quarter of the British forces is from England. American, Irish, and Scots. The narrator, a Highlander, says he fought against Cumberland and Wolfe in the battle at Culloden. I was stunned, F. R. I have read about that battle but somehow did not learn Wolfe fought in that bloody hell.

Humphreys uses the voices of those joined in this battle. Both generals were dead. The slaughter was appalling. The voice of Ellen Job, the only woman and a field nurse tended the body of General Wolfe. A testimony of nursing practices.

It rained for two days. This historic battle was fought in the rain and mud and cold, not for glory but through poverty and ignorance with little or no training. Expendable.

Patricia Peacock-Evans’ splendid watercoulour, pencil and ink drawings and Chris Hutcheson’s large format photographs are still appealing on my third visit.

The Carnegie Gallery, 10 King St. W. Dundas, www.carnegiegallery.org or 905-627-4265. Saturday evening Sept. 19, Suzie Vinnick entertains. Make an interesting two-fold visit.

Backpackers still wear flag with pride

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

Bob Rae sent me a request that amused me, Faithful Reader. A picture of a backpack with a Canadian flag. “We used to wear it abroad with pride.” Yes we did. I understand we still do, although my backpacking days are over. I think. Perhaps? Maybe not.

I discovered on my travels if I met a fellow traveller with a Canadian flag backpack adornment (mine was also on my black sketch book cover), who when I sidled up with a “Hello Canuck” greeting, frequently responded with a hesitant, “Uh, well, ummm, I’m really an American, travelling incognito.” They were always charming and gracious. We frequently spent a few hours together. Secretly, Faithful Reader, several times I encountered gaggles of British school girls, always in unescorted clusters, of course, who were loud and out to attract attention.

I seldom met Canadians. Once, in Mexico, the woman who questioned me closely about my nationality narrowed it down to my shop in Campbellville. She had been a customer there, lived in Oakville. Small world. My mother admonished me to always behave. “No matter how far you travel, someone may know you.” Indeed.

By the way, Bob, I don’t really think we can lay a Canadian’s bad manners at Mr. Harper’s feet. Outside the home, we should perhaps place blame at the school door. We could also step back a few years and teach a little flag etiquette.

I am catching up on reading my magazine copies that are stacking up, and then slithering to the floor. The September copy of my current favourite magazine The Walrus has an excellent six-page article, On the Plains of Abraham, 1759. It is not quite six pages long because there are illustrations. The author, Helen Humphreys, credits D. Peter MacLeod’s book, Northern Armageddon, for her information. She calls her article a re-enactment. The history of that battle that changed the colours on the map is told as if by those on both sides who fought. How very sad the few paragraphs in my school history book and my only visit to the battlefield told so little, so uninterestingly.

In the voice of a British soldier comes the information that less than a quarter of the British forces is from England. American, Irish, and Scots. The narrator, a Highlander, says he fought against Cumberland and Wolfe in the battle at Culloden. I was stunned, F. R. I have read about that battle but somehow did not learn Wolfe fought in that bloody hell.

Humphreys uses the voices of those joined in this battle. Both generals were dead. The slaughter was appalling. The voice of Ellen Job, the only woman and a field nurse tended the body of General Wolfe. A testimony of nursing practices.

It rained for two days. This historic battle was fought in the rain and mud and cold, not for glory but through poverty and ignorance with little or no training. Expendable.

Patricia Peacock-Evans’ splendid watercoulour, pencil and ink drawings and Chris Hutcheson’s large format photographs are still appealing on my third visit.

The Carnegie Gallery, 10 King St. W. Dundas, www.carnegiegallery.org or 905-627-4265. Saturday evening Sept. 19, Suzie Vinnick entertains. Make an interesting two-fold visit.