candidates vie for city’s new part-time integrity commissioner position

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

It seems everybody from summer students to people experienced in mediation want to become Hamilton’s next integrity commissioner.

City human resources staff told members of the accountability and transparency subcommittee last week the city received 68 applications for the position, including summer students, and recently graduated university people looking for a first job.

A second screening reduced the applications to 30, and a subsequent review cut that number to 10. A few subcommittee members were expected to take another look at the applicants. Interviews with the best candidates were to be scheduled as soon as possible.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger said he wants to see a person selected as a commissioner within a month.

“The sooner the better,” said Mr. Eisenberger.

Since the fall of 2007, the subcommittee has been involved in creating an integrity commissioner bylaw, which council passed in the spring of 2008. At the time Mr. Eisenberger insisted the best person to fill the position was a retired judge. But politicians and city staff quickly discovered few retired judges wanted the job.

In the meantime, council hired Toronto lawyer George Rust D’Eye as the city’s interim integrity commissioner to investigate Stoney Creek Councillor Brad Clark. Mr. Rust D’Eye had been retained as an outside investigator to review Mr. Eisenberger’s claims he violated council’s code of conduct for discussing personnel information with a reporter. Mr.

Rust D’Eye examined Mr. Clark’s involvement in releasing a tape of Mr. Eisenberger’s conversation to the public.

Soon after Mr. Rust D’Eye’s review of Mr. Clark was concluded, there was some concern about his bill, which was over $60,000.

Under the integrity commissioner bylaw, the position will be part-time.

The creation of an integrity commissioner, and a lobbyist list was part of Mr. Eisenberger’s 2006 mayoral campaign platform.

candidates vie for city’s new part-time integrity commissioner position

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

It seems everybody from summer students to people experienced in mediation want to become Hamilton’s next integrity commissioner.

City human resources staff told members of the accountability and transparency subcommittee last week the city received 68 applications for the position, including summer students, and recently graduated university people looking for a first job.

A second screening reduced the applications to 30, and a subsequent review cut that number to 10. A few subcommittee members were expected to take another look at the applicants. Interviews with the best candidates were to be scheduled as soon as possible.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger said he wants to see a person selected as a commissioner within a month.

“The sooner the better,” said Mr. Eisenberger.

Since the fall of 2007, the subcommittee has been involved in creating an integrity commissioner bylaw, which council passed in the spring of 2008. At the time Mr. Eisenberger insisted the best person to fill the position was a retired judge. But politicians and city staff quickly discovered few retired judges wanted the job.

In the meantime, council hired Toronto lawyer George Rust D’Eye as the city’s interim integrity commissioner to investigate Stoney Creek Councillor Brad Clark. Mr. Rust D’Eye had been retained as an outside investigator to review Mr. Eisenberger’s claims he violated council’s code of conduct for discussing personnel information with a reporter. Mr.

Rust D’Eye examined Mr. Clark’s involvement in releasing a tape of Mr. Eisenberger’s conversation to the public.

Soon after Mr. Rust D’Eye’s review of Mr. Clark was concluded, there was some concern about his bill, which was over $60,000.

Under the integrity commissioner bylaw, the position will be part-time.

The creation of an integrity commissioner, and a lobbyist list was part of Mr. Eisenberger’s 2006 mayoral campaign platform.

candidates vie for city’s new part-time integrity commissioner position

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

It seems everybody from summer students to people experienced in mediation want to become Hamilton’s next integrity commissioner.

City human resources staff told members of the accountability and transparency subcommittee last week the city received 68 applications for the position, including summer students, and recently graduated university people looking for a first job.

A second screening reduced the applications to 30, and a subsequent review cut that number to 10. A few subcommittee members were expected to take another look at the applicants. Interviews with the best candidates were to be scheduled as soon as possible.

Mayor Fred Eisenberger said he wants to see a person selected as a commissioner within a month.

“The sooner the better,” said Mr. Eisenberger.

Since the fall of 2007, the subcommittee has been involved in creating an integrity commissioner bylaw, which council passed in the spring of 2008. At the time Mr. Eisenberger insisted the best person to fill the position was a retired judge. But politicians and city staff quickly discovered few retired judges wanted the job.

In the meantime, council hired Toronto lawyer George Rust D’Eye as the city’s interim integrity commissioner to investigate Stoney Creek Councillor Brad Clark. Mr. Rust D’Eye had been retained as an outside investigator to review Mr. Eisenberger’s claims he violated council’s code of conduct for discussing personnel information with a reporter. Mr.

Rust D’Eye examined Mr. Clark’s involvement in releasing a tape of Mr. Eisenberger’s conversation to the public.

Soon after Mr. Rust D’Eye’s review of Mr. Clark was concluded, there was some concern about his bill, which was over $60,000.

Under the integrity commissioner bylaw, the position will be part-time.

The creation of an integrity commissioner, and a lobbyist list was part of Mr. Eisenberger’s 2006 mayoral campaign platform.