City put on alert for climate change plan

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

Environment Hamilton is challenging the city to change the way it does business.

The grassroots environmental group proposed to councillors this week that the municipality adopt a 10- point plan to assist the community in reaching the global goal of 350 parts per million in carbon dioxide emissions.

Environment Hamilton proposals include giving out 10 free bus tickets to each household, eliminating construction of surface parking, toll roads, parking spaces that are taxed, adopting a vehicle tax and freezing the urban boundary at its current status.

“These are realistic and cost-effective steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” said Mark Sproule-Jones, vice-chair of Environment Hamilton, and a retired professor at McMaster University.

The city, along with other local community groups, is already participating in the International Day Against Climate Change Oct. 24. The world-wide rally, from the Taj Mahal to the Great Barrier Reef is an attempt to pressure countries to approve a new global climate change treaty to meet the 350 parts per million target, which it does not do.

Countries are scheduled to meet December 2009 in Copenhagen, Denmark, to finalize the treaty.

Scientists have identified 350 as the safe upper limit for carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Currently, CO2 is at 390 parts per million.

Activists argue if nothing is done, the world will reach a climate change tipping point that will irreversibly start melting the Greenland ice sheet, and further erode the Arctic ice mass.

“(Climate change) has been predicted for years (and) it has been increasing since 1970,” said Mr. Sproule-Jones. “The trend will continue.”

Also included in Environment Hamilton’s plan was for the city conduct energy audits on all city-owned housing, adopt a municipal buy local purchasing policy, have the city commit to paying its share of the proposed $1.6 billion light-rail transit system, and establish traffic calming measures for 30 km speed limits in residential areas.

“These ideas are doable,” said Ward 1 councillor Brian McHattie.

Not only can the proposals be accomplished, but, said Councillor Sam Merulla, politicians have already debated the merits of them.

For instance, councillors have already talked about a buy local policy, which the city has yet to adopt, as well as the light-rail transit financing.

Mr. McHattie said City Hamilton has implemented energy audits on its units, and so far has saved considerable money.

City put on alert for climate change plan

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

Environment Hamilton is challenging the city to change the way it does business.

The grassroots environmental group proposed to councillors this week that the municipality adopt a 10- point plan to assist the community in reaching the global goal of 350 parts per million in carbon dioxide emissions.

Environment Hamilton proposals include giving out 10 free bus tickets to each household, eliminating construction of surface parking, toll roads, parking spaces that are taxed, adopting a vehicle tax and freezing the urban boundary at its current status.

“These are realistic and cost-effective steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” said Mark Sproule-Jones, vice-chair of Environment Hamilton, and a retired professor at McMaster University.

The city, along with other local community groups, is already participating in the International Day Against Climate Change Oct. 24. The world-wide rally, from the Taj Mahal to the Great Barrier Reef is an attempt to pressure countries to approve a new global climate change treaty to meet the 350 parts per million target, which it does not do.

Countries are scheduled to meet December 2009 in Copenhagen, Denmark, to finalize the treaty.

Scientists have identified 350 as the safe upper limit for carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Currently, CO2 is at 390 parts per million.

Activists argue if nothing is done, the world will reach a climate change tipping point that will irreversibly start melting the Greenland ice sheet, and further erode the Arctic ice mass.

“(Climate change) has been predicted for years (and) it has been increasing since 1970,” said Mr. Sproule-Jones. “The trend will continue.”

Also included in Environment Hamilton’s plan was for the city conduct energy audits on all city-owned housing, adopt a municipal buy local purchasing policy, have the city commit to paying its share of the proposed $1.6 billion light-rail transit system, and establish traffic calming measures for 30 km speed limits in residential areas.

“These ideas are doable,” said Ward 1 councillor Brian McHattie.

Not only can the proposals be accomplished, but, said Councillor Sam Merulla, politicians have already debated the merits of them.

For instance, councillors have already talked about a buy local policy, which the city has yet to adopt, as well as the light-rail transit financing.

Mr. McHattie said City Hamilton has implemented energy audits on its units, and so far has saved considerable money.

City put on alert for climate change plan

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

Environment Hamilton is challenging the city to change the way it does business.

The grassroots environmental group proposed to councillors this week that the municipality adopt a 10- point plan to assist the community in reaching the global goal of 350 parts per million in carbon dioxide emissions.

Environment Hamilton proposals include giving out 10 free bus tickets to each household, eliminating construction of surface parking, toll roads, parking spaces that are taxed, adopting a vehicle tax and freezing the urban boundary at its current status.

“These are realistic and cost-effective steps to reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” said Mark Sproule-Jones, vice-chair of Environment Hamilton, and a retired professor at McMaster University.

The city, along with other local community groups, is already participating in the International Day Against Climate Change Oct. 24. The world-wide rally, from the Taj Mahal to the Great Barrier Reef is an attempt to pressure countries to approve a new global climate change treaty to meet the 350 parts per million target, which it does not do.

Countries are scheduled to meet December 2009 in Copenhagen, Denmark, to finalize the treaty.

Scientists have identified 350 as the safe upper limit for carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. Currently, CO2 is at 390 parts per million.

Activists argue if nothing is done, the world will reach a climate change tipping point that will irreversibly start melting the Greenland ice sheet, and further erode the Arctic ice mass.

“(Climate change) has been predicted for years (and) it has been increasing since 1970,” said Mr. Sproule-Jones. “The trend will continue.”

Also included in Environment Hamilton’s plan was for the city conduct energy audits on all city-owned housing, adopt a municipal buy local purchasing policy, have the city commit to paying its share of the proposed $1.6 billion light-rail transit system, and establish traffic calming measures for 30 km speed limits in residential areas.

“These ideas are doable,” said Ward 1 councillor Brian McHattie.

Not only can the proposals be accomplished, but, said Councillor Sam Merulla, politicians have already debated the merits of them.

For instance, councillors have already talked about a buy local policy, which the city has yet to adopt, as well as the light-rail transit financing.

Mr. McHattie said City Hamilton has implemented energy audits on its units, and so far has saved considerable money.