Those who profit will never give us straight facts

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

Re: Tap, bottled water in an irrelevant comparison, Sept. 11.

I could not stop myself from responding to the letter to the editor written by Nestlé’s director of corporate affairs John Callinor.

Mr. Callinor’s letter affirmed what any business defending its livelihood does, states that it is serving a consumer “need” and bottled water is a “necessity” in our face-paced hectic modern times. Mr. Callinor’s driving point is that because people are just trying to be healthy and avoiding soft drinks, “there would be no noticeable increase in the amount of tap water consumed by Canadians” if single-use plastic water bottles were to disappear.

I guess that statement drives my major concern with the use of plastic bottles. They are not going to disappear. In fact the quick and convenient single-use water bottle will most definitely out-live you, and at the very least, 10 more generations of your family, because plastics can take hundreds of years to break down. Plastics don’t biodegrade, they photodegrade.

What Mr. Callinor conveniently avoids are the environmental and health impacts of continuing the practice of using individually packaged bottles of spring or filtered tap water.

While it’s nice to assume that 100 per cent of our recycled plastics are being processed into other products, we can’t ignore that most are not. Much of our plastic is creating larger landfills or ending up in the oceans. We also should not ignore the massive heap of plastic in the Pacific Ocean which is larger than the province of Quebec, referred to as the North Pacific Gyre.

While seabirds and fish choke on photodegrading plastic particles, many of us are unaware that plastic water bottles are also prone to bacterial growth and should be stored and handled like any other food, even if the packaging lacks this information.

As the recent studies implicating Bisphenol-A lead us to question all use of plastics, let’s not forget how much more oil is needed to truck these bottles to all the convenient places in our lives. Why not just drink from our taps?

Yes consumers like convenience, but the public is recognizing how much they are being scammed by this industry. Mr. Callinor, your convenience isn’t worth it. As we move forward and learn to better our lives, our health and our environment, we need to move on from plastic bottles, remembering that those who profit from their sale will never give us straight facts.

Christine McComb, Dundas

Those who profit will never give us straight facts

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

Re: Tap, bottled water in an irrelevant comparison, Sept. 11.

I could not stop myself from responding to the letter to the editor written by Nestlé’s director of corporate affairs John Callinor.

Mr. Callinor’s letter affirmed what any business defending its livelihood does, states that it is serving a consumer “need” and bottled water is a “necessity” in our face-paced hectic modern times. Mr. Callinor’s driving point is that because people are just trying to be healthy and avoiding soft drinks, “there would be no noticeable increase in the amount of tap water consumed by Canadians” if single-use plastic water bottles were to disappear.

I guess that statement drives my major concern with the use of plastic bottles. They are not going to disappear. In fact the quick and convenient single-use water bottle will most definitely out-live you, and at the very least, 10 more generations of your family, because plastics can take hundreds of years to break down. Plastics don’t biodegrade, they photodegrade.

What Mr. Callinor conveniently avoids are the environmental and health impacts of continuing the practice of using individually packaged bottles of spring or filtered tap water.

While it’s nice to assume that 100 per cent of our recycled plastics are being processed into other products, we can’t ignore that most are not. Much of our plastic is creating larger landfills or ending up in the oceans. We also should not ignore the massive heap of plastic in the Pacific Ocean which is larger than the province of Quebec, referred to as the North Pacific Gyre.

While seabirds and fish choke on photodegrading plastic particles, many of us are unaware that plastic water bottles are also prone to bacterial growth and should be stored and handled like any other food, even if the packaging lacks this information.

As the recent studies implicating Bisphenol-A lead us to question all use of plastics, let’s not forget how much more oil is needed to truck these bottles to all the convenient places in our lives. Why not just drink from our taps?

Yes consumers like convenience, but the public is recognizing how much they are being scammed by this industry. Mr. Callinor, your convenience isn’t worth it. As we move forward and learn to better our lives, our health and our environment, we need to move on from plastic bottles, remembering that those who profit from their sale will never give us straight facts.

Christine McComb, Dundas

Those who profit will never give us straight facts

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

Re: Tap, bottled water in an irrelevant comparison, Sept. 11.

I could not stop myself from responding to the letter to the editor written by Nestlé’s director of corporate affairs John Callinor.

Mr. Callinor’s letter affirmed what any business defending its livelihood does, states that it is serving a consumer “need” and bottled water is a “necessity” in our face-paced hectic modern times. Mr. Callinor’s driving point is that because people are just trying to be healthy and avoiding soft drinks, “there would be no noticeable increase in the amount of tap water consumed by Canadians” if single-use plastic water bottles were to disappear.

I guess that statement drives my major concern with the use of plastic bottles. They are not going to disappear. In fact the quick and convenient single-use water bottle will most definitely out-live you, and at the very least, 10 more generations of your family, because plastics can take hundreds of years to break down. Plastics don’t biodegrade, they photodegrade.

What Mr. Callinor conveniently avoids are the environmental and health impacts of continuing the practice of using individually packaged bottles of spring or filtered tap water.

While it’s nice to assume that 100 per cent of our recycled plastics are being processed into other products, we can’t ignore that most are not. Much of our plastic is creating larger landfills or ending up in the oceans. We also should not ignore the massive heap of plastic in the Pacific Ocean which is larger than the province of Quebec, referred to as the North Pacific Gyre.

While seabirds and fish choke on photodegrading plastic particles, many of us are unaware that plastic water bottles are also prone to bacterial growth and should be stored and handled like any other food, even if the packaging lacks this information.

As the recent studies implicating Bisphenol-A lead us to question all use of plastics, let’s not forget how much more oil is needed to truck these bottles to all the convenient places in our lives. Why not just drink from our taps?

Yes consumers like convenience, but the public is recognizing how much they are being scammed by this industry. Mr. Callinor, your convenience isn’t worth it. As we move forward and learn to better our lives, our health and our environment, we need to move on from plastic bottles, remembering that those who profit from their sale will never give us straight facts.

Christine McComb, Dundas