Weather predictions leave me depressed

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

The fine weather this month, including a fabulous Labour Day long weekend, has helped temper the extreme disappointment over another rainy summer — the second straight wet season in a row.

As a weekend cottager, there’s nothing worse than battling your way north on the 400 each Friday only to spend two days sitting inside, damp, cold and wet.

At home, the amount of precipitation this summer has had both positive and negative effects. In the garden, the flowers have bloomed beyond anything I’ve seen in a long time.

However, my tomatoes turned brown due to the lack of heat combined with too much water.

The grass looks great, and I haven’t had to water it all summer long.

Unfortunately, this has been a bumper year for weeds, and anyone with seasonal allergies is likely cursing the Ontario government these days for its ban of chemical herbicides. I hope the do-gooder environmentalists are happy. My only comfort would be in knowing that they are all suffering from seasonal allergies as bad as I am.

So what lies ahead for us in the coming months?

Will we see the amount of snow experienced last winter?

According to Environment Canada, temperatures in September through November will be above normal, while precipitation levels are expected to be below normal.

For the period between December through February, forecasters predict more above normal temperatures, and the amount of snow/rain/sleet is expected to fall below normal averages.

The same forecast is being predicted from March, April and May.

I know it’s still a long time away, but Environment Canada models show another cold, wet summer ahead from next June, July and August.

Maybe it’s time to sell the summer retreat? The brand new copy of The Old Farmer’s Almanac recently landed on my desk, and I immediately opened it up to the section on southern Ontario to see the prediction for the season ahead.

As usual, The Old Farmer’s Almanac has a different prediction than Environment Canada.

A lot has changed since Robert B. Thomas founded The Old Farmer’s Almanac back in 1792.

Techniques for predicting the weather today employ state-of-the-art technology and the use of three scientific disciplines: solar science, the study of sunspots and other solar activity; climatology, the study of prevailing weather patterns; and meteorology, the study of the atmosphere. Weather trends and events are predicted by comparing solar patterns and historical weather conditions with current solar activity.

Forecasts emphasize temperature and precipitation deviations from averages. These are based on 30-year statistical averages prepared by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and updated every 10 years.

According to the The Old Farmer’s Almanac, this winter will be colder than normal, especially in January and February. They are also predicting more snow than normal for our area, especially in late November, mid January and mid-to-late February.

April and May will be cooler than normal, while the summer will be cooler and drier than normal. Hot weather is expected in mid-to-late June, mid July and early August.

I’m not sure what prediction is better, so I’ll hold out hope in the one thing that’s certain – there’s no predicting the weather until it actually happens.

Weather predictions leave me depressed

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

The fine weather this month, including a fabulous Labour Day long weekend, has helped temper the extreme disappointment over another rainy summer — the second straight wet season in a row.

As a weekend cottager, there’s nothing worse than battling your way north on the 400 each Friday only to spend two days sitting inside, damp, cold and wet.

At home, the amount of precipitation this summer has had both positive and negative effects. In the garden, the flowers have bloomed beyond anything I’ve seen in a long time.

However, my tomatoes turned brown due to the lack of heat combined with too much water.

The grass looks great, and I haven’t had to water it all summer long.

Unfortunately, this has been a bumper year for weeds, and anyone with seasonal allergies is likely cursing the Ontario government these days for its ban of chemical herbicides. I hope the do-gooder environmentalists are happy. My only comfort would be in knowing that they are all suffering from seasonal allergies as bad as I am.

So what lies ahead for us in the coming months?

Will we see the amount of snow experienced last winter?

According to Environment Canada, temperatures in September through November will be above normal, while precipitation levels are expected to be below normal.

For the period between December through February, forecasters predict more above normal temperatures, and the amount of snow/rain/sleet is expected to fall below normal averages.

The same forecast is being predicted from March, April and May.

I know it’s still a long time away, but Environment Canada models show another cold, wet summer ahead from next June, July and August.

Maybe it’s time to sell the summer retreat? The brand new copy of The Old Farmer’s Almanac recently landed on my desk, and I immediately opened it up to the section on southern Ontario to see the prediction for the season ahead.

As usual, The Old Farmer’s Almanac has a different prediction than Environment Canada.

A lot has changed since Robert B. Thomas founded The Old Farmer’s Almanac back in 1792.

Techniques for predicting the weather today employ state-of-the-art technology and the use of three scientific disciplines: solar science, the study of sunspots and other solar activity; climatology, the study of prevailing weather patterns; and meteorology, the study of the atmosphere. Weather trends and events are predicted by comparing solar patterns and historical weather conditions with current solar activity.

Forecasts emphasize temperature and precipitation deviations from averages. These are based on 30-year statistical averages prepared by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and updated every 10 years.

According to the The Old Farmer’s Almanac, this winter will be colder than normal, especially in January and February. They are also predicting more snow than normal for our area, especially in late November, mid January and mid-to-late February.

April and May will be cooler than normal, while the summer will be cooler and drier than normal. Hot weather is expected in mid-to-late June, mid July and early August.

I’m not sure what prediction is better, so I’ll hold out hope in the one thing that’s certain – there’s no predicting the weather until it actually happens.

Weather predictions leave me depressed

News Sep 17, 2009 Ancaster News

The fine weather this month, including a fabulous Labour Day long weekend, has helped temper the extreme disappointment over another rainy summer — the second straight wet season in a row.

As a weekend cottager, there’s nothing worse than battling your way north on the 400 each Friday only to spend two days sitting inside, damp, cold and wet.

At home, the amount of precipitation this summer has had both positive and negative effects. In the garden, the flowers have bloomed beyond anything I’ve seen in a long time.

However, my tomatoes turned brown due to the lack of heat combined with too much water.

The grass looks great, and I haven’t had to water it all summer long.

Unfortunately, this has been a bumper year for weeds, and anyone with seasonal allergies is likely cursing the Ontario government these days for its ban of chemical herbicides. I hope the do-gooder environmentalists are happy. My only comfort would be in knowing that they are all suffering from seasonal allergies as bad as I am.

So what lies ahead for us in the coming months?

Will we see the amount of snow experienced last winter?

According to Environment Canada, temperatures in September through November will be above normal, while precipitation levels are expected to be below normal.

For the period between December through February, forecasters predict more above normal temperatures, and the amount of snow/rain/sleet is expected to fall below normal averages.

The same forecast is being predicted from March, April and May.

I know it’s still a long time away, but Environment Canada models show another cold, wet summer ahead from next June, July and August.

Maybe it’s time to sell the summer retreat? The brand new copy of The Old Farmer’s Almanac recently landed on my desk, and I immediately opened it up to the section on southern Ontario to see the prediction for the season ahead.

As usual, The Old Farmer’s Almanac has a different prediction than Environment Canada.

A lot has changed since Robert B. Thomas founded The Old Farmer’s Almanac back in 1792.

Techniques for predicting the weather today employ state-of-the-art technology and the use of three scientific disciplines: solar science, the study of sunspots and other solar activity; climatology, the study of prevailing weather patterns; and meteorology, the study of the atmosphere. Weather trends and events are predicted by comparing solar patterns and historical weather conditions with current solar activity.

Forecasts emphasize temperature and precipitation deviations from averages. These are based on 30-year statistical averages prepared by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and updated every 10 years.

According to the The Old Farmer’s Almanac, this winter will be colder than normal, especially in January and February. They are also predicting more snow than normal for our area, especially in late November, mid January and mid-to-late February.

April and May will be cooler than normal, while the summer will be cooler and drier than normal. Hot weather is expected in mid-to-late June, mid July and early August.

I’m not sure what prediction is better, so I’ll hold out hope in the one thing that’s certain – there’s no predicting the weather until it actually happens.