Girls invited to try ringette

News Sep 10, 2009 Ancaster News

Girls five and older are invited to hit the ice Saturday to learn about a winter game other than hockey.

Hamilton Ringette Association is holding a "Come try ringette" day at Chedoke arena.

"We have activities on the ice to showcase the sport," says Wayne MacDonald, the club's past president.

There will also be members available to answer questions and pizza will be served.

The event is free, girls just need to bring skates, a helmet and gloves.

Ringette was first played in North Bay in 1963.

"I think at that time girls weren't welcome on boys' hockey teams," says Mr. MacDonald.

While the games are similar, ringette is not simply hockey for girls, he says.

There are six players per team, the same painted lines are used and everyone has a stick, but there is a shot clock in ringette, along with elements of lacrosse and basketball. The game also promotes more team play thanks to the rules which dictate an abundance of passing.

When the Hamilton Ringette Association was formed in 1969, there were about 450 players. At its peak, about 500 girls played, with games at Lawfield arena and in the lower city.

In recent years that number has dropped off and this year only about 170 players are expected.

These days, Inch Park Arena is the lone home base for rep and house league games, while Chedoke and the Mohawk four-pad are used for practices.

"Come try ringette" day runs from 11:30 a. m.-12:30 p. m. Saturday at Chedoke. Registration and rep team tryouts begin at 8:30 a. m.

The league is also trying to organize a league for women 19 and older.

For full registration details, see hamiltonringette.ca .

Girls invited to try ringette

News Sep 10, 2009 Ancaster News

Girls five and older are invited to hit the ice Saturday to learn about a winter game other than hockey.

Hamilton Ringette Association is holding a "Come try ringette" day at Chedoke arena.

"We have activities on the ice to showcase the sport," says Wayne MacDonald, the club's past president.

There will also be members available to answer questions and pizza will be served.

The event is free, girls just need to bring skates, a helmet and gloves.

Ringette was first played in North Bay in 1963.

"I think at that time girls weren't welcome on boys' hockey teams," says Mr. MacDonald.

While the games are similar, ringette is not simply hockey for girls, he says.

There are six players per team, the same painted lines are used and everyone has a stick, but there is a shot clock in ringette, along with elements of lacrosse and basketball. The game also promotes more team play thanks to the rules which dictate an abundance of passing.

When the Hamilton Ringette Association was formed in 1969, there were about 450 players. At its peak, about 500 girls played, with games at Lawfield arena and in the lower city.

In recent years that number has dropped off and this year only about 170 players are expected.

These days, Inch Park Arena is the lone home base for rep and house league games, while Chedoke and the Mohawk four-pad are used for practices.

"Come try ringette" day runs from 11:30 a. m.-12:30 p. m. Saturday at Chedoke. Registration and rep team tryouts begin at 8:30 a. m.

The league is also trying to organize a league for women 19 and older.

For full registration details, see hamiltonringette.ca .

Girls invited to try ringette

News Sep 10, 2009 Ancaster News

Girls five and older are invited to hit the ice Saturday to learn about a winter game other than hockey.

Hamilton Ringette Association is holding a "Come try ringette" day at Chedoke arena.

"We have activities on the ice to showcase the sport," says Wayne MacDonald, the club's past president.

There will also be members available to answer questions and pizza will be served.

The event is free, girls just need to bring skates, a helmet and gloves.

Ringette was first played in North Bay in 1963.

"I think at that time girls weren't welcome on boys' hockey teams," says Mr. MacDonald.

While the games are similar, ringette is not simply hockey for girls, he says.

There are six players per team, the same painted lines are used and everyone has a stick, but there is a shot clock in ringette, along with elements of lacrosse and basketball. The game also promotes more team play thanks to the rules which dictate an abundance of passing.

When the Hamilton Ringette Association was formed in 1969, there were about 450 players. At its peak, about 500 girls played, with games at Lawfield arena and in the lower city.

In recent years that number has dropped off and this year only about 170 players are expected.

These days, Inch Park Arena is the lone home base for rep and house league games, while Chedoke and the Mohawk four-pad are used for practices.

"Come try ringette" day runs from 11:30 a. m.-12:30 p. m. Saturday at Chedoke. Registration and rep team tryouts begin at 8:30 a. m.

The league is also trying to organize a league for women 19 and older.

For full registration details, see hamiltonringette.ca .