A walk to remember

News Sep 04, 2009 Ancaster News

Imagine a time when horse-drawn wagons strolled through Wilson Street West. Mohawk Road was merely a gateway to pastoral farms. The Ancaster Fair was still held annually in the village core. And it was decades before anyone would coin the phrase, ‘big box store.’

Ancaster was a much different place when John and Flora Livingstone started walking together nearly seven decades ago.

John, now 98, remembers a time when only three families in Ancaster owned an automobile. Mr. Livingstone’s family got their first automobile, a used GM model, sometime around 1926.

“Ford, Chev and Buick were the only three makers of cars in those days,” said Mr. Livingstone. He also recalls a time when all the local shops in Ancaster had horse stalls where shoppers could keep their horses as they browsed for merchandise.

The Livingstones lived for decades on Mohawk Road, at a time when you could cross farm fields and end up at Tiffany Halls or at the bottom of Highway 2. Today they still walk together from their new digs at Carrington Place Retirement Home.

“I think that’s what’s kept us alive, being active,” said Mr. Livingstone.

After 67 years of marriage, the Livingstones have kept their sense of humour and are enjoying life at their new surroundings.

Originally from Scotland, John came to Canada as a two-year-old child. The family boarded a ship, the first vessel to travel past the ill-fated voyage route of the Titanic. While John is too young to remember, family members told him the ship stopped for a memorial service while crossing the North Atlantic.

John grew up in Ancaster near the Old Mill and later went on to a 40-year career with general contractor Frid Construction. One of the company’s trademark projects was the Ford truck plant in Oakville.

Flora, 93, also had a career with National Bakery on King St. E. She worked at the bakery with John’s sister, who on occasion, invited Flora to stay with the family in Ancaster. That’s when the couple’s walks first began. Their walks were sometimes short and sometimes lengthy. At times they walked west down Sulphur Springs Road all the way to Dundas and back. On other occasions they walked the escarpment trails or took a trip to the scenic Tiffany Falls.

“It was quite a hike from our place to Tiffany Falls, but we did it,” Mrs. Livingstone recalled.

While the names, the places and the scenery have all changed over the years, one thing has remained constant in the Livingstone’s lives. The couple is grateful to all the friendly people they have met over the years.

“It’s kind of hard for me to judge,” said Mrs. Livingstone. “Because everyone’s been so good to us.”

A walk to remember

News Sep 04, 2009 Ancaster News

Imagine a time when horse-drawn wagons strolled through Wilson Street West. Mohawk Road was merely a gateway to pastoral farms. The Ancaster Fair was still held annually in the village core. And it was decades before anyone would coin the phrase, ‘big box store.’

Ancaster was a much different place when John and Flora Livingstone started walking together nearly seven decades ago.

John, now 98, remembers a time when only three families in Ancaster owned an automobile. Mr. Livingstone’s family got their first automobile, a used GM model, sometime around 1926.

“Ford, Chev and Buick were the only three makers of cars in those days,” said Mr. Livingstone. He also recalls a time when all the local shops in Ancaster had horse stalls where shoppers could keep their horses as they browsed for merchandise.

The Livingstones lived for decades on Mohawk Road, at a time when you could cross farm fields and end up at Tiffany Halls or at the bottom of Highway 2. Today they still walk together from their new digs at Carrington Place Retirement Home.

“I think that’s what’s kept us alive, being active,” said Mr. Livingstone.

After 67 years of marriage, the Livingstones have kept their sense of humour and are enjoying life at their new surroundings.

Originally from Scotland, John came to Canada as a two-year-old child. The family boarded a ship, the first vessel to travel past the ill-fated voyage route of the Titanic. While John is too young to remember, family members told him the ship stopped for a memorial service while crossing the North Atlantic.

John grew up in Ancaster near the Old Mill and later went on to a 40-year career with general contractor Frid Construction. One of the company’s trademark projects was the Ford truck plant in Oakville.

Flora, 93, also had a career with National Bakery on King St. E. She worked at the bakery with John’s sister, who on occasion, invited Flora to stay with the family in Ancaster. That’s when the couple’s walks first began. Their walks were sometimes short and sometimes lengthy. At times they walked west down Sulphur Springs Road all the way to Dundas and back. On other occasions they walked the escarpment trails or took a trip to the scenic Tiffany Falls.

“It was quite a hike from our place to Tiffany Falls, but we did it,” Mrs. Livingstone recalled.

While the names, the places and the scenery have all changed over the years, one thing has remained constant in the Livingstone’s lives. The couple is grateful to all the friendly people they have met over the years.

“It’s kind of hard for me to judge,” said Mrs. Livingstone. “Because everyone’s been so good to us.”

A walk to remember

News Sep 04, 2009 Ancaster News

Imagine a time when horse-drawn wagons strolled through Wilson Street West. Mohawk Road was merely a gateway to pastoral farms. The Ancaster Fair was still held annually in the village core. And it was decades before anyone would coin the phrase, ‘big box store.’

Ancaster was a much different place when John and Flora Livingstone started walking together nearly seven decades ago.

John, now 98, remembers a time when only three families in Ancaster owned an automobile. Mr. Livingstone’s family got their first automobile, a used GM model, sometime around 1926.

“Ford, Chev and Buick were the only three makers of cars in those days,” said Mr. Livingstone. He also recalls a time when all the local shops in Ancaster had horse stalls where shoppers could keep their horses as they browsed for merchandise.

The Livingstones lived for decades on Mohawk Road, at a time when you could cross farm fields and end up at Tiffany Halls or at the bottom of Highway 2. Today they still walk together from their new digs at Carrington Place Retirement Home.

“I think that’s what’s kept us alive, being active,” said Mr. Livingstone.

After 67 years of marriage, the Livingstones have kept their sense of humour and are enjoying life at their new surroundings.

Originally from Scotland, John came to Canada as a two-year-old child. The family boarded a ship, the first vessel to travel past the ill-fated voyage route of the Titanic. While John is too young to remember, family members told him the ship stopped for a memorial service while crossing the North Atlantic.

John grew up in Ancaster near the Old Mill and later went on to a 40-year career with general contractor Frid Construction. One of the company’s trademark projects was the Ford truck plant in Oakville.

Flora, 93, also had a career with National Bakery on King St. E. She worked at the bakery with John’s sister, who on occasion, invited Flora to stay with the family in Ancaster. That’s when the couple’s walks first began. Their walks were sometimes short and sometimes lengthy. At times they walked west down Sulphur Springs Road all the way to Dundas and back. On other occasions they walked the escarpment trails or took a trip to the scenic Tiffany Falls.

“It was quite a hike from our place to Tiffany Falls, but we did it,” Mrs. Livingstone recalled.

While the names, the places and the scenery have all changed over the years, one thing has remained constant in the Livingstone’s lives. The couple is grateful to all the friendly people they have met over the years.

“It’s kind of hard for me to judge,” said Mrs. Livingstone. “Because everyone’s been so good to us.”