Conservative Sweet leaves political future up to constituents

News Aug 28, 2009 Ancaster News

If the federal Conservatives are asking for a majority government from Canadians, David Sweet isn’t advocating for one.

The Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough- Westdale MP refused to say if it’s time for a majority government rather than the successive minority governments the Conservatives have won over the last two elections.

“Our policy is to always stay ready,” said Mr. Sweet. “We don’t want an election. I don’t think the Canadian people do. The opposition is talking about it. We will continue to work hard for Canadians and stay ready.”

Prime Minister Stephen Harper and a few Conservative MPs have been calling for a majority government in the next election. The Conservatives barely missed a majority in the 2008 fall election winning 143 seats in the House of Commons, 12 seats away from a clear majority in the 308-seat chamber.

The Conservatives called for a majority in 2004, but the Liberals under Paul Martin launched a “Stop Harper” campaign saying Mr. Harper and his Conservative candidates had a “hidden agenda.”

In the 2006 and 2008 elections Mr. Harper kept asking Canadians for a “stronger mandate” but refused to say they wanted a majority government.

Mr. Sweet edged Liberal Russ Powers to become the riding’s MP in the 2006 election earning 24,530 votes to Mr. Powers’ 21,656 votes. In the 2008 election, Mr. Sweet added to his victory total with 26,297 votes against second-place finisher Liberal candidate Arlene MacFarland- VanderBeek’s 15,422 vote total.

The Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough- Westdale federal Liberal riding association recently selected former CH Television anchor Dan McLean, from Lynden, to carry its banner in the next election. Mr. Sweet refused to weigh the impact Mr. McLean will have in an election.

“I’m not into judging candidates,” he said. “I’ve always tried to work hard for the constituents. I’ll leave it to the people of ADFW and judge me on my record.”

The ADFW federal NDP riding association president Patrick Rose said he expects the party will hold a nomination meeting sometime in September. He confirmed that Gordon Guyatt, who has been the party’s candidate for the past two federal elections, will not seek the nomination. He said there are a number of people interested in the nomination.

Mr. Sweet refutes the idea Canadians were ever afraid of the Conservatives or their policies, but puts his faith in his constituents to keep him in office.

“I don’t know if there was any fear (by Canadians),” he said. “Whenever election day is, whenever the opposition decides to bring the government down, we’ll find out.”

The Liberals have an opportunity to table a no-confident motion on Sept. 30, with reports that Nov. 9 is a possible election date.

Liberals have dismissed reports of a fall election as speculation.

Conservative Sweet leaves political future up to constituents

News Aug 28, 2009 Ancaster News

If the federal Conservatives are asking for a majority government from Canadians, David Sweet isn’t advocating for one.

The Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough- Westdale MP refused to say if it’s time for a majority government rather than the successive minority governments the Conservatives have won over the last two elections.

“Our policy is to always stay ready,” said Mr. Sweet. “We don’t want an election. I don’t think the Canadian people do. The opposition is talking about it. We will continue to work hard for Canadians and stay ready.”

Prime Minister Stephen Harper and a few Conservative MPs have been calling for a majority government in the next election. The Conservatives barely missed a majority in the 2008 fall election winning 143 seats in the House of Commons, 12 seats away from a clear majority in the 308-seat chamber.

The Conservatives called for a majority in 2004, but the Liberals under Paul Martin launched a “Stop Harper” campaign saying Mr. Harper and his Conservative candidates had a “hidden agenda.”

In the 2006 and 2008 elections Mr. Harper kept asking Canadians for a “stronger mandate” but refused to say they wanted a majority government.

Mr. Sweet edged Liberal Russ Powers to become the riding’s MP in the 2006 election earning 24,530 votes to Mr. Powers’ 21,656 votes. In the 2008 election, Mr. Sweet added to his victory total with 26,297 votes against second-place finisher Liberal candidate Arlene MacFarland- VanderBeek’s 15,422 vote total.

The Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough- Westdale federal Liberal riding association recently selected former CH Television anchor Dan McLean, from Lynden, to carry its banner in the next election. Mr. Sweet refused to weigh the impact Mr. McLean will have in an election.

“I’m not into judging candidates,” he said. “I’ve always tried to work hard for the constituents. I’ll leave it to the people of ADFW and judge me on my record.”

The ADFW federal NDP riding association president Patrick Rose said he expects the party will hold a nomination meeting sometime in September. He confirmed that Gordon Guyatt, who has been the party’s candidate for the past two federal elections, will not seek the nomination. He said there are a number of people interested in the nomination.

Mr. Sweet refutes the idea Canadians were ever afraid of the Conservatives or their policies, but puts his faith in his constituents to keep him in office.

“I don’t know if there was any fear (by Canadians),” he said. “Whenever election day is, whenever the opposition decides to bring the government down, we’ll find out.”

The Liberals have an opportunity to table a no-confident motion on Sept. 30, with reports that Nov. 9 is a possible election date.

Liberals have dismissed reports of a fall election as speculation.

Conservative Sweet leaves political future up to constituents

News Aug 28, 2009 Ancaster News

If the federal Conservatives are asking for a majority government from Canadians, David Sweet isn’t advocating for one.

The Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough- Westdale MP refused to say if it’s time for a majority government rather than the successive minority governments the Conservatives have won over the last two elections.

“Our policy is to always stay ready,” said Mr. Sweet. “We don’t want an election. I don’t think the Canadian people do. The opposition is talking about it. We will continue to work hard for Canadians and stay ready.”

Prime Minister Stephen Harper and a few Conservative MPs have been calling for a majority government in the next election. The Conservatives barely missed a majority in the 2008 fall election winning 143 seats in the House of Commons, 12 seats away from a clear majority in the 308-seat chamber.

The Conservatives called for a majority in 2004, but the Liberals under Paul Martin launched a “Stop Harper” campaign saying Mr. Harper and his Conservative candidates had a “hidden agenda.”

In the 2006 and 2008 elections Mr. Harper kept asking Canadians for a “stronger mandate” but refused to say they wanted a majority government.

Mr. Sweet edged Liberal Russ Powers to become the riding’s MP in the 2006 election earning 24,530 votes to Mr. Powers’ 21,656 votes. In the 2008 election, Mr. Sweet added to his victory total with 26,297 votes against second-place finisher Liberal candidate Arlene MacFarland- VanderBeek’s 15,422 vote total.

The Ancaster-Dundas-Flamborough- Westdale federal Liberal riding association recently selected former CH Television anchor Dan McLean, from Lynden, to carry its banner in the next election. Mr. Sweet refused to weigh the impact Mr. McLean will have in an election.

“I’m not into judging candidates,” he said. “I’ve always tried to work hard for the constituents. I’ll leave it to the people of ADFW and judge me on my record.”

The ADFW federal NDP riding association president Patrick Rose said he expects the party will hold a nomination meeting sometime in September. He confirmed that Gordon Guyatt, who has been the party’s candidate for the past two federal elections, will not seek the nomination. He said there are a number of people interested in the nomination.

Mr. Sweet refutes the idea Canadians were ever afraid of the Conservatives or their policies, but puts his faith in his constituents to keep him in office.

“I don’t know if there was any fear (by Canadians),” he said. “Whenever election day is, whenever the opposition decides to bring the government down, we’ll find out.”

The Liberals have an opportunity to table a no-confident motion on Sept. 30, with reports that Nov. 9 is a possible election date.

Liberals have dismissed reports of a fall election as speculation.