Guyatt will not run for NDP in next election

News Aug 28, 2009 Ancaster News

After nearly 10 years on the political campaign trail, Dr. Gordon Guyatt is shelving his walking shoes and putting on his lab coat for the next federal election.

Mr. Guyatt, 56, who first challenged Liberal John Bryant in the 2000 federal election as the NDP candidate for the Ancaster-Dundas- Flamborough-Aldershot riding, decided another candidate should take the helm of the local NDP riding association in the next election.

“Four times is enough,” said Dr. Guyatt, who is a specialist in internal medicine, practicing out of McMaster University, and a world renowned researcher. “I know people have come to see me as a fixture for the NDP here.”

Dr. Guyatt earned 3,756 votes and fourth place in a four-person field won by Mr. Bryden’s 19,921 votes in the 2000 federal election.

He increased his vote total in the 2004 federal election, collecting 11,557 votes, but still far back of winner Liberal Russ Powers. Again, Dr. Guyatt earned more votes in the 2006 federal election, topping 13,376, but he was far down the list as Conservative David Sweet outlasted Mr. Powers 24,530 votes to 21,656 in a see-saw battle. In the 2008 federal election Mr. Guyatt settled into his customary third-place finish with 9,632 votes, far back of Mr. Sweet’s winning 26,297 tally. Liberal Arlene MacFarlane- VanderBeek was well back with 15,422 votes.

Mr. Guyatt, who lives in Dundas with his wife and three daughters, said it would have been an interesting election battle in the riding this time between Mr. Sweet and Liberal candidate Dan McLean, a former CH television anchor. He pointed out a number of conservative governments have introduced NDP policies in response to the global economic slowdown, such as the bank bailouts, taking over the auto companies, and the discussion over health care.

Good time to be NDP candidate

“The NDP policies have been vindicated by governments,” he said. “It would have been a good time to be an NDP candidate.”

During his campaigning, Dr. Guyatt was known for his defense of Canada’s universal health care, which he believed the Conservative government was trying to dismantle. He still believes there remains a “right-wing specter” that is intent on remaking health care and other government policies in their image.

Patrick Rose, the ADFW federal NDP riding president, said he expects the association will hold a nomination meeting sometime in September. He said the riding has received “a whole bunch of people” interested in the nomination.

“This will be a good race for us because our candidate will be going up against two Conservatives,” he said. “It will make our candidate stand out even more.”

He refused to say who is seeking the nomination.

The federal Liberals are preparing for a possible fall election, with speculation that Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff will bring down the government in a no-confidence vote in late September.

Mr. Guyatt said he is not endorsing any NDP candidate for the nomination of the party. But if he’s called upon to support a candidate, or make a speech, he is more than willing to do it.

“I have been running at a break neck pace, juggling politics, academics, and my family over the years,” he said. “I was breathless. I found it to be enough for me.”

Guyatt will not run for NDP in next election

News Aug 28, 2009 Ancaster News

After nearly 10 years on the political campaign trail, Dr. Gordon Guyatt is shelving his walking shoes and putting on his lab coat for the next federal election.

Mr. Guyatt, 56, who first challenged Liberal John Bryant in the 2000 federal election as the NDP candidate for the Ancaster-Dundas- Flamborough-Aldershot riding, decided another candidate should take the helm of the local NDP riding association in the next election.

“Four times is enough,” said Dr. Guyatt, who is a specialist in internal medicine, practicing out of McMaster University, and a world renowned researcher. “I know people have come to see me as a fixture for the NDP here.”

Dr. Guyatt earned 3,756 votes and fourth place in a four-person field won by Mr. Bryden’s 19,921 votes in the 2000 federal election.

He increased his vote total in the 2004 federal election, collecting 11,557 votes, but still far back of winner Liberal Russ Powers. Again, Dr. Guyatt earned more votes in the 2006 federal election, topping 13,376, but he was far down the list as Conservative David Sweet outlasted Mr. Powers 24,530 votes to 21,656 in a see-saw battle. In the 2008 federal election Mr. Guyatt settled into his customary third-place finish with 9,632 votes, far back of Mr. Sweet’s winning 26,297 tally. Liberal Arlene MacFarlane- VanderBeek was well back with 15,422 votes.

Mr. Guyatt, who lives in Dundas with his wife and three daughters, said it would have been an interesting election battle in the riding this time between Mr. Sweet and Liberal candidate Dan McLean, a former CH television anchor. He pointed out a number of conservative governments have introduced NDP policies in response to the global economic slowdown, such as the bank bailouts, taking over the auto companies, and the discussion over health care.

Good time to be NDP candidate

“The NDP policies have been vindicated by governments,” he said. “It would have been a good time to be an NDP candidate.”

During his campaigning, Dr. Guyatt was known for his defense of Canada’s universal health care, which he believed the Conservative government was trying to dismantle. He still believes there remains a “right-wing specter” that is intent on remaking health care and other government policies in their image.

Patrick Rose, the ADFW federal NDP riding president, said he expects the association will hold a nomination meeting sometime in September. He said the riding has received “a whole bunch of people” interested in the nomination.

“This will be a good race for us because our candidate will be going up against two Conservatives,” he said. “It will make our candidate stand out even more.”

He refused to say who is seeking the nomination.

The federal Liberals are preparing for a possible fall election, with speculation that Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff will bring down the government in a no-confidence vote in late September.

Mr. Guyatt said he is not endorsing any NDP candidate for the nomination of the party. But if he’s called upon to support a candidate, or make a speech, he is more than willing to do it.

“I have been running at a break neck pace, juggling politics, academics, and my family over the years,” he said. “I was breathless. I found it to be enough for me.”

Guyatt will not run for NDP in next election

News Aug 28, 2009 Ancaster News

After nearly 10 years on the political campaign trail, Dr. Gordon Guyatt is shelving his walking shoes and putting on his lab coat for the next federal election.

Mr. Guyatt, 56, who first challenged Liberal John Bryant in the 2000 federal election as the NDP candidate for the Ancaster-Dundas- Flamborough-Aldershot riding, decided another candidate should take the helm of the local NDP riding association in the next election.

“Four times is enough,” said Dr. Guyatt, who is a specialist in internal medicine, practicing out of McMaster University, and a world renowned researcher. “I know people have come to see me as a fixture for the NDP here.”

Dr. Guyatt earned 3,756 votes and fourth place in a four-person field won by Mr. Bryden’s 19,921 votes in the 2000 federal election.

He increased his vote total in the 2004 federal election, collecting 11,557 votes, but still far back of winner Liberal Russ Powers. Again, Dr. Guyatt earned more votes in the 2006 federal election, topping 13,376, but he was far down the list as Conservative David Sweet outlasted Mr. Powers 24,530 votes to 21,656 in a see-saw battle. In the 2008 federal election Mr. Guyatt settled into his customary third-place finish with 9,632 votes, far back of Mr. Sweet’s winning 26,297 tally. Liberal Arlene MacFarlane- VanderBeek was well back with 15,422 votes.

Mr. Guyatt, who lives in Dundas with his wife and three daughters, said it would have been an interesting election battle in the riding this time between Mr. Sweet and Liberal candidate Dan McLean, a former CH television anchor. He pointed out a number of conservative governments have introduced NDP policies in response to the global economic slowdown, such as the bank bailouts, taking over the auto companies, and the discussion over health care.

Good time to be NDP candidate

“The NDP policies have been vindicated by governments,” he said. “It would have been a good time to be an NDP candidate.”

During his campaigning, Dr. Guyatt was known for his defense of Canada’s universal health care, which he believed the Conservative government was trying to dismantle. He still believes there remains a “right-wing specter” that is intent on remaking health care and other government policies in their image.

Patrick Rose, the ADFW federal NDP riding president, said he expects the association will hold a nomination meeting sometime in September. He said the riding has received “a whole bunch of people” interested in the nomination.

“This will be a good race for us because our candidate will be going up against two Conservatives,” he said. “It will make our candidate stand out even more.”

He refused to say who is seeking the nomination.

The federal Liberals are preparing for a possible fall election, with speculation that Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff will bring down the government in a no-confidence vote in late September.

Mr. Guyatt said he is not endorsing any NDP candidate for the nomination of the party. But if he’s called upon to support a candidate, or make a speech, he is more than willing to do it.

“I have been running at a break neck pace, juggling politics, academics, and my family over the years,” he said. “I was breathless. I found it to be enough for me.”