Shocking but true: city actually saves on energy costs

News Aug 20, 2009 Ancaster News

Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson did a little mea culpa last week over his steadfast opposition to the creation of the office of energy initiatives.

Since the new department was created in May 2006, Mr. Ferguson has been pointed in his criticism of hiring staff and a developing a new bureaucracy at a time when taxes remain high, the economy has tanked, and residents are scrambling just to pay their bills.

He fought against Office of Energy Initiatives, the addition of manager Geoff Lupton, and the hiring of two senior project managers staff in early 2007.

But last week, Mr. Ferguson apologized for his position.

“I was skeptical,” he said. “I was wrong to oppose adding new staff.”

In its 19-month report since its creation, the department has saved or avoided just over $10 million in extra costs to the city. The city’s corporate energy consumption has dropped 3.3 per cent by the end of 2008.

The office’s goal when it was created was to reduce the city’s energy reductions in its city-own facilities by 20 per cent by 2020, or about 1.5 per cent savings per year. By 2012, the cumulative energy savings is projected to be $8.7 million, and by 2020, it will reach $49 million.

The energy savings and avoidances will also reduce Hamilton’s greenhouse gas emissions by 20 per cent by 2020.

“It shows leadership,” said Mr. Ferguson. “This is working well.”

Added Mayor Fred Eisenberger, an early supporter of the department, “This has been a great investment. They have proven their worth 10 times over.”

Public Works General Manager Gerry Davis said he will present to councillors a business case for adding more staff to the department.

The corporate energy report, which was presented to councillors earlier this month, revealed the city’s energy consumption has dropped 4 per cent for electricity, 2.3 per cent for natural gas and 30 per cent for water and wastewater.

The savings have been achieved by implementing energy retrofits of 19 city facilities, saving $227,000; LED traffic replacements saving $313,000, initiating energy improvements at City Housing Hamilton facilities, replacing four new chillers at the Central Utilities Plant saving about $100,000, using a chiller from city hall for Copps Coliseum saving about $400,000, moving the cooling tower from city hall to installing it at the Central Library will save about $150,000 and retrofitting Copps’ lighting system saving $150,000.

Shocking but true: city actually saves on energy costs

News Aug 20, 2009 Ancaster News

Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson did a little mea culpa last week over his steadfast opposition to the creation of the office of energy initiatives.

Since the new department was created in May 2006, Mr. Ferguson has been pointed in his criticism of hiring staff and a developing a new bureaucracy at a time when taxes remain high, the economy has tanked, and residents are scrambling just to pay their bills.

He fought against Office of Energy Initiatives, the addition of manager Geoff Lupton, and the hiring of two senior project managers staff in early 2007.

But last week, Mr. Ferguson apologized for his position.

“I was skeptical,” he said. “I was wrong to oppose adding new staff.”

In its 19-month report since its creation, the department has saved or avoided just over $10 million in extra costs to the city. The city’s corporate energy consumption has dropped 3.3 per cent by the end of 2008.

The office’s goal when it was created was to reduce the city’s energy reductions in its city-own facilities by 20 per cent by 2020, or about 1.5 per cent savings per year. By 2012, the cumulative energy savings is projected to be $8.7 million, and by 2020, it will reach $49 million.

The energy savings and avoidances will also reduce Hamilton’s greenhouse gas emissions by 20 per cent by 2020.

“It shows leadership,” said Mr. Ferguson. “This is working well.”

Added Mayor Fred Eisenberger, an early supporter of the department, “This has been a great investment. They have proven their worth 10 times over.”

Public Works General Manager Gerry Davis said he will present to councillors a business case for adding more staff to the department.

The corporate energy report, which was presented to councillors earlier this month, revealed the city’s energy consumption has dropped 4 per cent for electricity, 2.3 per cent for natural gas and 30 per cent for water and wastewater.

The savings have been achieved by implementing energy retrofits of 19 city facilities, saving $227,000; LED traffic replacements saving $313,000, initiating energy improvements at City Housing Hamilton facilities, replacing four new chillers at the Central Utilities Plant saving about $100,000, using a chiller from city hall for Copps Coliseum saving about $400,000, moving the cooling tower from city hall to installing it at the Central Library will save about $150,000 and retrofitting Copps’ lighting system saving $150,000.

Shocking but true: city actually saves on energy costs

News Aug 20, 2009 Ancaster News

Ancaster councillor Lloyd Ferguson did a little mea culpa last week over his steadfast opposition to the creation of the office of energy initiatives.

Since the new department was created in May 2006, Mr. Ferguson has been pointed in his criticism of hiring staff and a developing a new bureaucracy at a time when taxes remain high, the economy has tanked, and residents are scrambling just to pay their bills.

He fought against Office of Energy Initiatives, the addition of manager Geoff Lupton, and the hiring of two senior project managers staff in early 2007.

But last week, Mr. Ferguson apologized for his position.

“I was skeptical,” he said. “I was wrong to oppose adding new staff.”

In its 19-month report since its creation, the department has saved or avoided just over $10 million in extra costs to the city. The city’s corporate energy consumption has dropped 3.3 per cent by the end of 2008.

The office’s goal when it was created was to reduce the city’s energy reductions in its city-own facilities by 20 per cent by 2020, or about 1.5 per cent savings per year. By 2012, the cumulative energy savings is projected to be $8.7 million, and by 2020, it will reach $49 million.

The energy savings and avoidances will also reduce Hamilton’s greenhouse gas emissions by 20 per cent by 2020.

“It shows leadership,” said Mr. Ferguson. “This is working well.”

Added Mayor Fred Eisenberger, an early supporter of the department, “This has been a great investment. They have proven their worth 10 times over.”

Public Works General Manager Gerry Davis said he will present to councillors a business case for adding more staff to the department.

The corporate energy report, which was presented to councillors earlier this month, revealed the city’s energy consumption has dropped 4 per cent for electricity, 2.3 per cent for natural gas and 30 per cent for water and wastewater.

The savings have been achieved by implementing energy retrofits of 19 city facilities, saving $227,000; LED traffic replacements saving $313,000, initiating energy improvements at City Housing Hamilton facilities, replacing four new chillers at the Central Utilities Plant saving about $100,000, using a chiller from city hall for Copps Coliseum saving about $400,000, moving the cooling tower from city hall to installing it at the Central Library will save about $150,000 and retrofitting Copps’ lighting system saving $150,000.