Team pulls together to restore eyesight

News Aug 14, 2009 Ancaster News

A local financial planner and his teams are, quite literally, pulling together to change lives.

Ryan teBoekhorst will head two teams of 20 when ORBIS Canada rolls a FedEx cargo airplane onto the tarmac at Pearson International Airport on Aug. 22 and hands participants the daunting task of hauling the craft 12 feet.

ORBIS Canada is part of a global non-profit organization whose mission is to preserve and restore eyesight in regions throughout the world. One of its main initiatives is the Flying Eye Hospital, a DC-10 plane that has been turned into an ophthalmic surgical hospital and teaching facility, which is staffed with volunteer ophthalmologists, nurses and other support staff.

Some of the hospital’s upcoming destinations include Laos, the Dominican Republic, Peru, Syria, Kenya, India, Bangladesh and Taiwan.

Mr. teBoekhorst had never heard of ORBIS Canada or Pull for Sight before he signed up earlier this month. His impetus was an experience he has as a member of the Rotary Club of Dundas. Mr. teBoekhorst had just finished his “classification” talk, a ritual for all new Rotarians who are asked to speak about themselves and their vocations.

As a thank you for his presentation, Mr. teBoekhorst was given a certificate indicating the eyesight of someone in a Third World country had been restored on his behalf.

“I thought, if we’re going to cure blindness, let’s go one step further,” said Mr. TeBoekhorst, adding he got online and quickly discovered the ORBIS Canada fundraiser.

In just a couple of weeks, Mr. teBoekhorst has gathered 40 friends, primarily through his job with RBC Dominion Securities and from his alma mater, Wilfrid Laurier University, who will form a men’s and women’s team.

Mr. teBoekhorst said the men’s team, which features several former Laurier volleyball players, hopes to earn the title of Fastest Pull.

“We haven’t actually done anything to prepare, but we have strategized about who should be first, second and third on the rope,” said Mr. teBoekhorst with a laugh.

Each team participating in the Pull for Sight contributes a minimum of $1,000, or $50 per team member. A starter signals when to begin and starts a stopwatch. After a team pulls the aircraft 12 feet, the elapsed time is recorded as the score. Team prizes are awarded for fastest pull, slowest pull, top single fundraiser, top team fundraisers and most enthusiastic team.

For more information, see www.orbiscanada.ca

Team pulls together to restore eyesight

News Aug 14, 2009 Ancaster News

A local financial planner and his teams are, quite literally, pulling together to change lives.

Ryan teBoekhorst will head two teams of 20 when ORBIS Canada rolls a FedEx cargo airplane onto the tarmac at Pearson International Airport on Aug. 22 and hands participants the daunting task of hauling the craft 12 feet.

ORBIS Canada is part of a global non-profit organization whose mission is to preserve and restore eyesight in regions throughout the world. One of its main initiatives is the Flying Eye Hospital, a DC-10 plane that has been turned into an ophthalmic surgical hospital and teaching facility, which is staffed with volunteer ophthalmologists, nurses and other support staff.

Some of the hospital’s upcoming destinations include Laos, the Dominican Republic, Peru, Syria, Kenya, India, Bangladesh and Taiwan.

Mr. teBoekhorst had never heard of ORBIS Canada or Pull for Sight before he signed up earlier this month. His impetus was an experience he has as a member of the Rotary Club of Dundas. Mr. teBoekhorst had just finished his “classification” talk, a ritual for all new Rotarians who are asked to speak about themselves and their vocations.

As a thank you for his presentation, Mr. teBoekhorst was given a certificate indicating the eyesight of someone in a Third World country had been restored on his behalf.

“I thought, if we’re going to cure blindness, let’s go one step further,” said Mr. TeBoekhorst, adding he got online and quickly discovered the ORBIS Canada fundraiser.

In just a couple of weeks, Mr. teBoekhorst has gathered 40 friends, primarily through his job with RBC Dominion Securities and from his alma mater, Wilfrid Laurier University, who will form a men’s and women’s team.

Mr. teBoekhorst said the men’s team, which features several former Laurier volleyball players, hopes to earn the title of Fastest Pull.

“We haven’t actually done anything to prepare, but we have strategized about who should be first, second and third on the rope,” said Mr. teBoekhorst with a laugh.

Each team participating in the Pull for Sight contributes a minimum of $1,000, or $50 per team member. A starter signals when to begin and starts a stopwatch. After a team pulls the aircraft 12 feet, the elapsed time is recorded as the score. Team prizes are awarded for fastest pull, slowest pull, top single fundraiser, top team fundraisers and most enthusiastic team.

For more information, see www.orbiscanada.ca

Team pulls together to restore eyesight

News Aug 14, 2009 Ancaster News

A local financial planner and his teams are, quite literally, pulling together to change lives.

Ryan teBoekhorst will head two teams of 20 when ORBIS Canada rolls a FedEx cargo airplane onto the tarmac at Pearson International Airport on Aug. 22 and hands participants the daunting task of hauling the craft 12 feet.

ORBIS Canada is part of a global non-profit organization whose mission is to preserve and restore eyesight in regions throughout the world. One of its main initiatives is the Flying Eye Hospital, a DC-10 plane that has been turned into an ophthalmic surgical hospital and teaching facility, which is staffed with volunteer ophthalmologists, nurses and other support staff.

Some of the hospital’s upcoming destinations include Laos, the Dominican Republic, Peru, Syria, Kenya, India, Bangladesh and Taiwan.

Mr. teBoekhorst had never heard of ORBIS Canada or Pull for Sight before he signed up earlier this month. His impetus was an experience he has as a member of the Rotary Club of Dundas. Mr. teBoekhorst had just finished his “classification” talk, a ritual for all new Rotarians who are asked to speak about themselves and their vocations.

As a thank you for his presentation, Mr. teBoekhorst was given a certificate indicating the eyesight of someone in a Third World country had been restored on his behalf.

“I thought, if we’re going to cure blindness, let’s go one step further,” said Mr. TeBoekhorst, adding he got online and quickly discovered the ORBIS Canada fundraiser.

In just a couple of weeks, Mr. teBoekhorst has gathered 40 friends, primarily through his job with RBC Dominion Securities and from his alma mater, Wilfrid Laurier University, who will form a men’s and women’s team.

Mr. teBoekhorst said the men’s team, which features several former Laurier volleyball players, hopes to earn the title of Fastest Pull.

“We haven’t actually done anything to prepare, but we have strategized about who should be first, second and third on the rope,” said Mr. teBoekhorst with a laugh.

Each team participating in the Pull for Sight contributes a minimum of $1,000, or $50 per team member. A starter signals when to begin and starts a stopwatch. After a team pulls the aircraft 12 feet, the elapsed time is recorded as the score. Team prizes are awarded for fastest pull, slowest pull, top single fundraiser, top team fundraisers and most enthusiastic team.

For more information, see www.orbiscanada.ca