Rebecca Morris-Miller wanted no funeral or memorial. Instead, she urged colleagues to ‘feed sushi to the homeless’

News Dec 03, 2022 by Jon Wells Hamilton Spectator

There will be no readings or speeches, just wounded hearts, tears and smiles.

Perhaps Rebecca Morris-Miller would have frowned upon even a simple gathering of remembrance in the wake of her death.

After all, the founder of Grenfell Ministries in Hamilton wrote in her will that she did not want a funeral or memorial service.

But the leader who inspired colleagues and friends is no longer here to weigh in with an opinion, or offer a typically laugh-out-loud observation.

Morris-Miller, who battled substance addiction but worked tirelessly to help others cope with their demons, died of a suspected drug overdose Oct. 31.

On Saturday, Dec. 10, the doors will be opened at The First Unitarian Church of Hamilton at 170 Dundurn St. S., just south of Main Street West, for all who want to remember her, reads a news release from Grenfell, a faith-based non-profit organization.

The gathering will last from 1 to 4 p.m. and refreshments will be served.

Morris-Miller had turned 40 four weeks before she died. She was found in the bedroom of her home on Sherman Avenue South near Main Street East.

She conceived the idea of Grenfell Ministries while talking to fellow inmates when she was in jail years ago. The organization supports people facing substance abuse issues, mental illness, and homelessness.

Colleague Barb Swietek told The Spectator that Grenfell received “an outpouring of support and love” in the days since her friend’s death.

“Becky was such a bright light in this world,” she said. “Our community is feeling her loss in a huge way, but we will continue the important work she started.”

Last week, Hamilton Mountain MPP Monique Taylor paid tribute to Morris-Miller at Queen’s Park: “Becky was always doing what she herself called revolutionary work. She had faith in people when they didn’t have faith in themselves.”

A GoFundMe page has been established for Morris-Miller’s family.

While she had long told family and friends she was opposed to a formal memorial upon her death, as was her way, Morris-Miller was not silent in her will about what she did want.

“Instead she wanted us to feed sushi to the homeless,” said Swietek. “We laughed and thought it was so much like Becky. And we will honour that.”

Jon Wells is a feature writer at The Spectator. jwells@thespec.com

Rebecca Morris-Miller wanted no funeral or memorial. Instead, she urged colleagues to ‘feed sushi to the homeless’

Gathering being held Dec. 10 to remember Grenfell Ministries founder who died of suspected drug overdose.

News Dec 03, 2022 by Jon Wells Hamilton Spectator

There will be no readings or speeches, just wounded hearts, tears and smiles.

Perhaps Rebecca Morris-Miller would have frowned upon even a simple gathering of remembrance in the wake of her death.

After all, the founder of Grenfell Ministries in Hamilton wrote in her will that she did not want a funeral or memorial service.

But the leader who inspired colleagues and friends is no longer here to weigh in with an opinion, or offer a typically laugh-out-loud observation.

Related Content

Morris-Miller, who battled substance addiction but worked tirelessly to help others cope with their demons, died of a suspected drug overdose Oct. 31.

On Saturday, Dec. 10, the doors will be opened at The First Unitarian Church of Hamilton at 170 Dundurn St. S., just south of Main Street West, for all who want to remember her, reads a news release from Grenfell, a faith-based non-profit organization.

The gathering will last from 1 to 4 p.m. and refreshments will be served.

Morris-Miller had turned 40 four weeks before she died. She was found in the bedroom of her home on Sherman Avenue South near Main Street East.

She conceived the idea of Grenfell Ministries while talking to fellow inmates when she was in jail years ago. The organization supports people facing substance abuse issues, mental illness, and homelessness.

Colleague Barb Swietek told The Spectator that Grenfell received “an outpouring of support and love” in the days since her friend’s death.

“Becky was such a bright light in this world,” she said. “Our community is feeling her loss in a huge way, but we will continue the important work she started.”

Last week, Hamilton Mountain MPP Monique Taylor paid tribute to Morris-Miller at Queen’s Park: “Becky was always doing what she herself called revolutionary work. She had faith in people when they didn’t have faith in themselves.”

A GoFundMe page has been established for Morris-Miller’s family.

While she had long told family and friends she was opposed to a formal memorial upon her death, as was her way, Morris-Miller was not silent in her will about what she did want.

“Instead she wanted us to feed sushi to the homeless,” said Swietek. “We laughed and thought it was so much like Becky. And we will honour that.”

Jon Wells is a feature writer at The Spectator. jwells@thespec.com

Rebecca Morris-Miller wanted no funeral or memorial. Instead, she urged colleagues to ‘feed sushi to the homeless’

Gathering being held Dec. 10 to remember Grenfell Ministries founder who died of suspected drug overdose.

News Dec 03, 2022 by Jon Wells Hamilton Spectator

There will be no readings or speeches, just wounded hearts, tears and smiles.

Perhaps Rebecca Morris-Miller would have frowned upon even a simple gathering of remembrance in the wake of her death.

After all, the founder of Grenfell Ministries in Hamilton wrote in her will that she did not want a funeral or memorial service.

But the leader who inspired colleagues and friends is no longer here to weigh in with an opinion, or offer a typically laugh-out-loud observation.

Related Content

Morris-Miller, who battled substance addiction but worked tirelessly to help others cope with their demons, died of a suspected drug overdose Oct. 31.

On Saturday, Dec. 10, the doors will be opened at The First Unitarian Church of Hamilton at 170 Dundurn St. S., just south of Main Street West, for all who want to remember her, reads a news release from Grenfell, a faith-based non-profit organization.

The gathering will last from 1 to 4 p.m. and refreshments will be served.

Morris-Miller had turned 40 four weeks before she died. She was found in the bedroom of her home on Sherman Avenue South near Main Street East.

She conceived the idea of Grenfell Ministries while talking to fellow inmates when she was in jail years ago. The organization supports people facing substance abuse issues, mental illness, and homelessness.

Colleague Barb Swietek told The Spectator that Grenfell received “an outpouring of support and love” in the days since her friend’s death.

“Becky was such a bright light in this world,” she said. “Our community is feeling her loss in a huge way, but we will continue the important work she started.”

Last week, Hamilton Mountain MPP Monique Taylor paid tribute to Morris-Miller at Queen’s Park: “Becky was always doing what she herself called revolutionary work. She had faith in people when they didn’t have faith in themselves.”

A GoFundMe page has been established for Morris-Miller’s family.

While she had long told family and friends she was opposed to a formal memorial upon her death, as was her way, Morris-Miller was not silent in her will about what she did want.

“Instead she wanted us to feed sushi to the homeless,” said Swietek. “We laughed and thought it was so much like Becky. And we will honour that.”

Jon Wells is a feature writer at The Spectator. jwells@thespec.com