Hamilton councillors back pilot project to crack down on waterfall parking scofflaws

News Feb 11, 2021 by Teviah Moro Hamilton Spectator

Expect stepped-up parking enforcement around Hamilton waterfalls.

City councillors have agreed to add two full-time bylaw and five part-time parking officers to crack down on scofflaws visiting the city’s natural wonders.

The temporary positions are for a pilot project from March 15 to Nov. 15 that comes with a net cost of $354,000 to be funded from a city reserve.

Coun. Arlene VanderBeek hopes the effort will help give locals besieged by waterfall seekers and parking problems “back their life.”

Hiked parking tickets of $250 in special enforcement areas around waterfalls around the city have eased parking headaches for Greensville residents, the Dundas councillor said.

But the grief for those who live around Tew’s Falls, Webster’s Falls and Dundas Peak has shifted to other parts of the city, VanderBeek added during a budget session Thursday.

“What’s happened now is it’s moved. It’s expanded,” she told councillors. “People are looking everywhere to be able to walk and enjoy nature.”

The higher officer presence alone has helped cut down on bad behaviour, but bylaw and parking resources are “very stretched,” VanderBeek said.

“So we’re not out for a money grab.”

Over the past three years, fines in special enforcement areas have averaged $233,000 annually, a staff report noted.

In addition to the Greensville falls, Smokey Hollow Falls in Waterdown and Devil’s Punchbowl in upper Stoney Creek have been subject to hiked parking fines.

Coun. Brad Clark said when Devil’s Punchbowl “exploded in popularity,” he was “blown away” by the number of visitors parking on the shoulders of road leading to the deep gorge.

The beefed-up enforcement has helped, Clark said. “It has made a difference. I’d like to see it continue as a program.”

Councillors backed VanderBeek’s call for the pilot project in a 14-0 vote.

Staff are to report back in January 2022 on the success of the pilot and whether it should continue.

The initiative was approved during 2021 budget deliberations. The overall residential hike sits at two per cent with more talks ahead. Council aims to approve this year’s spending plan by the end of March.

Hamilton councillors back pilot project to crack down on waterfall parking scofflaws

‘We’re not out for a money grab,’ says Coun. Arlene VanderBeek

News Feb 11, 2021 by Teviah Moro Hamilton Spectator

Expect stepped-up parking enforcement around Hamilton waterfalls.

City councillors have agreed to add two full-time bylaw and five part-time parking officers to crack down on scofflaws visiting the city’s natural wonders.

The temporary positions are for a pilot project from March 15 to Nov. 15 that comes with a net cost of $354,000 to be funded from a city reserve.

Coun. Arlene VanderBeek hopes the effort will help give locals besieged by waterfall seekers and parking problems “back their life.”

Related Content

Hiked parking tickets of $250 in special enforcement areas around waterfalls around the city have eased parking headaches for Greensville residents, the Dundas councillor said.

But the grief for those who live around Tew’s Falls, Webster’s Falls and Dundas Peak has shifted to other parts of the city, VanderBeek added during a budget session Thursday.

“What’s happened now is it’s moved. It’s expanded,” she told councillors. “People are looking everywhere to be able to walk and enjoy nature.”

The higher officer presence alone has helped cut down on bad behaviour, but bylaw and parking resources are “very stretched,” VanderBeek said.

“So we’re not out for a money grab.”

Over the past three years, fines in special enforcement areas have averaged $233,000 annually, a staff report noted.

In addition to the Greensville falls, Smokey Hollow Falls in Waterdown and Devil’s Punchbowl in upper Stoney Creek have been subject to hiked parking fines.

Coun. Brad Clark said when Devil’s Punchbowl “exploded in popularity,” he was “blown away” by the number of visitors parking on the shoulders of road leading to the deep gorge.

The beefed-up enforcement has helped, Clark said. “It has made a difference. I’d like to see it continue as a program.”

Councillors backed VanderBeek’s call for the pilot project in a 14-0 vote.

Staff are to report back in January 2022 on the success of the pilot and whether it should continue.

The initiative was approved during 2021 budget deliberations. The overall residential hike sits at two per cent with more talks ahead. Council aims to approve this year’s spending plan by the end of March.

Hamilton councillors back pilot project to crack down on waterfall parking scofflaws

‘We’re not out for a money grab,’ says Coun. Arlene VanderBeek

News Feb 11, 2021 by Teviah Moro Hamilton Spectator

Expect stepped-up parking enforcement around Hamilton waterfalls.

City councillors have agreed to add two full-time bylaw and five part-time parking officers to crack down on scofflaws visiting the city’s natural wonders.

The temporary positions are for a pilot project from March 15 to Nov. 15 that comes with a net cost of $354,000 to be funded from a city reserve.

Coun. Arlene VanderBeek hopes the effort will help give locals besieged by waterfall seekers and parking problems “back their life.”

Related Content

Hiked parking tickets of $250 in special enforcement areas around waterfalls around the city have eased parking headaches for Greensville residents, the Dundas councillor said.

But the grief for those who live around Tew’s Falls, Webster’s Falls and Dundas Peak has shifted to other parts of the city, VanderBeek added during a budget session Thursday.

“What’s happened now is it’s moved. It’s expanded,” she told councillors. “People are looking everywhere to be able to walk and enjoy nature.”

The higher officer presence alone has helped cut down on bad behaviour, but bylaw and parking resources are “very stretched,” VanderBeek said.

“So we’re not out for a money grab.”

Over the past three years, fines in special enforcement areas have averaged $233,000 annually, a staff report noted.

In addition to the Greensville falls, Smokey Hollow Falls in Waterdown and Devil’s Punchbowl in upper Stoney Creek have been subject to hiked parking fines.

Coun. Brad Clark said when Devil’s Punchbowl “exploded in popularity,” he was “blown away” by the number of visitors parking on the shoulders of road leading to the deep gorge.

The beefed-up enforcement has helped, Clark said. “It has made a difference. I’d like to see it continue as a program.”

Councillors backed VanderBeek’s call for the pilot project in a 14-0 vote.

Staff are to report back in January 2022 on the success of the pilot and whether it should continue.

The initiative was approved during 2021 budget deliberations. The overall residential hike sits at two per cent with more talks ahead. Council aims to approve this year’s spending plan by the end of March.