Dundas seniors housing rent increase may be stalled by provincial freeze

News Oct 26, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

A potential 47 per cent rent increase at a previously non-profit seniors’ affordable housing complex may be stalled by a provincial rent freeze.

Proformance Investments GP Inc. bought the former Dundas Lions Club rental building at 50 Creighton Rd. for $2.7-million on Oct. 6. The Dundas Star News was told that, in a meeting with tenants on Oct. 19, Proformance president Derek Conorton reportedly said rents would increase from the current monthly rate of approximately $675 to about $995 per month effective Jan. 1, 2021.

Conorton did not respond to requests for comment.

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing spokesperson Conrad Spezowka said rents must remain at the 2020 level next year for most rental units in Ontario, in an effort to protect tenants during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Our government is freezing rent in 2021 for rent-controlled and non-rent-controlled units, to give the vast majority of Ontario tenants some relief during these unprecedented times,” Spezowka said.

The Landlord Tenant Board had not received an application to increase rent above the rent increase guideline at 50 Creighton Rd., as of Monday, Oct. 26. The guideline for 2020 was a maximum increase of 2.2 per cent.

Tribunals Ontario spokesperson Janet Deline said a rental unit tenant who believes a landlord has illegally increased their rent may file an application with the Landlord Tenant Board.

The 10-unit building was opened in 1961 by the Dundas Lions Club to provide non-profit affordable rental housing for seniors. It was built and maintained with more than $90,000 in loans and grants from the federal and provincial governments. More than $85,000 in loans, including interest, were paid back to the Canada Mortgage Housing Corporation.

The property is zoned medium-density residential. Permitted uses include an apartment building or up to four separate dwelling units. The zoning requires a minimum 30 per cent of the site to be landscaped.

In addition, 50 Creighton is in a flood plain. Spencer Creek runs through the site and a notation on the zoning states the property “is susceptible to flooding and/or erosion” and the Hamilton Conservation Authority must be contacted before any development or redevelopment.

Scott Peck, Hamilton Conservation Authority directory of watershed planning, said the property is in special policy area 1, which allows development in the flood fringe, provided it is floodproofed.

“Over the summer we have had correspondence with a consultant regarding the site as it relates to the floodplain and erosion setback from Spencer Creek. Our last correspondence was June 2020,” Peck said. “We are not in receipt of a permit application.”

Floodproofing can require placing fill on a property to raise it above minimum flood levels. Requirements for setbacks and floodproofing are site-specific and depend on details of an actual development proposal.

June Christy, City of Hamilton senior project manager of development planning, said the city has not received any development applications, nor any request for formal consultation, for 50 Creighton Rd.

 

Dundas seniors housing rent increase may be stalled by provincial freeze

Former Lions Club affordable seniors apartment property located within flood plain

News Oct 26, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

A potential 47 per cent rent increase at a previously non-profit seniors’ affordable housing complex may be stalled by a provincial rent freeze.

Proformance Investments GP Inc. bought the former Dundas Lions Club rental building at 50 Creighton Rd. for $2.7-million on Oct. 6. The Dundas Star News was told that, in a meeting with tenants on Oct. 19, Proformance president Derek Conorton reportedly said rents would increase from the current monthly rate of approximately $675 to about $995 per month effective Jan. 1, 2021.

Conorton did not respond to requests for comment.

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing spokesperson Conrad Spezowka said rents must remain at the 2020 level next year for most rental units in Ontario, in an effort to protect tenants during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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“Our government is freezing rent in 2021 for rent-controlled and non-rent-controlled units, to give the vast majority of Ontario tenants some relief during these unprecedented times,” Spezowka said.

The Landlord Tenant Board had not received an application to increase rent above the rent increase guideline at 50 Creighton Rd., as of Monday, Oct. 26. The guideline for 2020 was a maximum increase of 2.2 per cent.

Tribunals Ontario spokesperson Janet Deline said a rental unit tenant who believes a landlord has illegally increased their rent may file an application with the Landlord Tenant Board.

The 10-unit building was opened in 1961 by the Dundas Lions Club to provide non-profit affordable rental housing for seniors. It was built and maintained with more than $90,000 in loans and grants from the federal and provincial governments. More than $85,000 in loans, including interest, were paid back to the Canada Mortgage Housing Corporation.

The property is zoned medium-density residential. Permitted uses include an apartment building or up to four separate dwelling units. The zoning requires a minimum 30 per cent of the site to be landscaped.

In addition, 50 Creighton is in a flood plain. Spencer Creek runs through the site and a notation on the zoning states the property “is susceptible to flooding and/or erosion” and the Hamilton Conservation Authority must be contacted before any development or redevelopment.

Scott Peck, Hamilton Conservation Authority directory of watershed planning, said the property is in special policy area 1, which allows development in the flood fringe, provided it is floodproofed.

“Over the summer we have had correspondence with a consultant regarding the site as it relates to the floodplain and erosion setback from Spencer Creek. Our last correspondence was June 2020,” Peck said. “We are not in receipt of a permit application.”

Floodproofing can require placing fill on a property to raise it above minimum flood levels. Requirements for setbacks and floodproofing are site-specific and depend on details of an actual development proposal.

June Christy, City of Hamilton senior project manager of development planning, said the city has not received any development applications, nor any request for formal consultation, for 50 Creighton Rd.

 

Dundas seniors housing rent increase may be stalled by provincial freeze

Former Lions Club affordable seniors apartment property located within flood plain

News Oct 26, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

A potential 47 per cent rent increase at a previously non-profit seniors’ affordable housing complex may be stalled by a provincial rent freeze.

Proformance Investments GP Inc. bought the former Dundas Lions Club rental building at 50 Creighton Rd. for $2.7-million on Oct. 6. The Dundas Star News was told that, in a meeting with tenants on Oct. 19, Proformance president Derek Conorton reportedly said rents would increase from the current monthly rate of approximately $675 to about $995 per month effective Jan. 1, 2021.

Conorton did not respond to requests for comment.

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing spokesperson Conrad Spezowka said rents must remain at the 2020 level next year for most rental units in Ontario, in an effort to protect tenants during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Related Content

“Our government is freezing rent in 2021 for rent-controlled and non-rent-controlled units, to give the vast majority of Ontario tenants some relief during these unprecedented times,” Spezowka said.

The Landlord Tenant Board had not received an application to increase rent above the rent increase guideline at 50 Creighton Rd., as of Monday, Oct. 26. The guideline for 2020 was a maximum increase of 2.2 per cent.

Tribunals Ontario spokesperson Janet Deline said a rental unit tenant who believes a landlord has illegally increased their rent may file an application with the Landlord Tenant Board.

The 10-unit building was opened in 1961 by the Dundas Lions Club to provide non-profit affordable rental housing for seniors. It was built and maintained with more than $90,000 in loans and grants from the federal and provincial governments. More than $85,000 in loans, including interest, were paid back to the Canada Mortgage Housing Corporation.

The property is zoned medium-density residential. Permitted uses include an apartment building or up to four separate dwelling units. The zoning requires a minimum 30 per cent of the site to be landscaped.

In addition, 50 Creighton is in a flood plain. Spencer Creek runs through the site and a notation on the zoning states the property “is susceptible to flooding and/or erosion” and the Hamilton Conservation Authority must be contacted before any development or redevelopment.

Scott Peck, Hamilton Conservation Authority directory of watershed planning, said the property is in special policy area 1, which allows development in the flood fringe, provided it is floodproofed.

“Over the summer we have had correspondence with a consultant regarding the site as it relates to the floodplain and erosion setback from Spencer Creek. Our last correspondence was June 2020,” Peck said. “We are not in receipt of a permit application.”

Floodproofing can require placing fill on a property to raise it above minimum flood levels. Requirements for setbacks and floodproofing are site-specific and depend on details of an actual development proposal.

June Christy, City of Hamilton senior project manager of development planning, said the city has not received any development applications, nor any request for formal consultation, for 50 Creighton Rd.