Hamilton developer appeals 9-storey plan for Stone Church Road on Mountain

News Oct 23, 2020 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton Mountain Coun. John-Paul Danko was “disappointed” that Valeri Construction Limited is filing an appeal to permit a proposed nine-storey, 209-unit residential development at the corner of Stone Church Road and West 5th Street because council has taken too long to approve the application.

“We were working with Valeri,” said Danko. “It is really disappointing for me as the ward councillor, and very disappointing for the ward residents who participated in this process.”

Valeri Construction Limited had sent a letter to the city on July 30, 2020 stating council had yet to adopt an official plan amendment for the property within 120 days of the application identified as completed. The owner is appealing the non-decision to the Local Appeal Planning Tribunal. City staff had identified the application as complete on May 23, 2019. Since the initial application for the rezoning application, 465 days have gone by.

“Our client is of the opinion that the applications as submitted are consistent with the Provincial Policy Statement 2014,” stated Russell Cheeseman, lawyer for Valeri Construction Ltd.

But Danko said city staff had been actively engaged with the owner to shape the application to properly fit the unusual, 0.8-hectare property. It is bounded by Stone Church Road West to the north, St. Mary’s Assyrian Church to the east, a currently vacant lot that has received site plan approval for a retirement facility to the south, and West 5th Street to the west.

“We were working with that applicant to try to (make it) more sympathetic to the surrounding area,” said city planner James Van Rooi. “However, as those discussions transpired it was clear we were just on different sides of the fence.”

Van Rooi told a recent planning committee meeting that the developer had first submitted a 237-unit residential development that included a 10-storey building with 70 surface parking spaces and 171 underground parking spots. City staff opposed the proposal since it provided “little” buffering and there was a lack of setbacks between the residential homes and neighbouring lands to the north, east and west. Staff also had problems with the height and “mass” of the building.

On Feb. 20, 2020 a revised application was provided to the city that proposed 226-residential units in a 10-storey building, with 59 surface parking lots and 167 underground spaces. The plan had adequate setback requirements, but staff still had “concerns with the design and impact of massing and height” for the property.

A third submission, on June 17, 2020, proposed a 216-unit residential development in a nine-storey building with 54 surface parking spaces and 243 underground spots.

“Although this proposal reduced the height, the building footprint was increased,” stated planning staff.

The setbacks had been reduced, and the height and “massing remained an issue.”

Van Rooi said within the area there are only single-family homes and four-storey institutional buildings. Upper James, which is a block over, has the next highest buildings at six storeys.

“All of a sudden we are facing this development proposal of 10 storeys, with a density that is double to what is appropriate,” he said.

A public meeting, held Sept. 19, 2019, found that a large number of people were opposed to the plan. Staff have received 47 written submissions against the project and a petition signed by 76 people objecting to the development.

Danko lashed out at the developer for bypassing the municipality and going straight to the appeals tribunal to try to get the application approved.

“It is really unfair to the residents,” said Danko.

Residents were concerned about possible increases in traffic, parking problems, the site servicing capacity, over development of the site and compatibility of having a nine-storey tower beside existing single-family homes.



Hamilton developer appeals 9-storey plan for Stone Church Road on Mountain

Developer takes plan to Local Appeal Planning Tribunal over council's non-decision

News Oct 23, 2020 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton Mountain Coun. John-Paul Danko was “disappointed” that Valeri Construction Limited is filing an appeal to permit a proposed nine-storey, 209-unit residential development at the corner of Stone Church Road and West 5th Street because council has taken too long to approve the application.

“We were working with Valeri,” said Danko. “It is really disappointing for me as the ward councillor, and very disappointing for the ward residents who participated in this process.”

Valeri Construction Limited had sent a letter to the city on July 30, 2020 stating council had yet to adopt an official plan amendment for the property within 120 days of the application identified as completed. The owner is appealing the non-decision to the Local Appeal Planning Tribunal. City staff had identified the application as complete on May 23, 2019. Since the initial application for the rezoning application, 465 days have gone by.

“Our client is of the opinion that the applications as submitted are consistent with the Provincial Policy Statement 2014,” stated Russell Cheeseman, lawyer for Valeri Construction Ltd.

But Danko said city staff had been actively engaged with the owner to shape the application to properly fit the unusual, 0.8-hectare property. It is bounded by Stone Church Road West to the north, St. Mary’s Assyrian Church to the east, a currently vacant lot that has received site plan approval for a retirement facility to the south, and West 5th Street to the west.

“We were working with that applicant to try to (make it) more sympathetic to the surrounding area,” said city planner James Van Rooi. “However, as those discussions transpired it was clear we were just on different sides of the fence.”

Van Rooi told a recent planning committee meeting that the developer had first submitted a 237-unit residential development that included a 10-storey building with 70 surface parking spaces and 171 underground parking spots. City staff opposed the proposal since it provided “little” buffering and there was a lack of setbacks between the residential homes and neighbouring lands to the north, east and west. Staff also had problems with the height and “mass” of the building.

On Feb. 20, 2020 a revised application was provided to the city that proposed 226-residential units in a 10-storey building, with 59 surface parking lots and 167 underground spaces. The plan had adequate setback requirements, but staff still had “concerns with the design and impact of massing and height” for the property.

A third submission, on June 17, 2020, proposed a 216-unit residential development in a nine-storey building with 54 surface parking spaces and 243 underground spots.

“Although this proposal reduced the height, the building footprint was increased,” stated planning staff.

The setbacks had been reduced, and the height and “massing remained an issue.”

Van Rooi said within the area there are only single-family homes and four-storey institutional buildings. Upper James, which is a block over, has the next highest buildings at six storeys.

“All of a sudden we are facing this development proposal of 10 storeys, with a density that is double to what is appropriate,” he said.

A public meeting, held Sept. 19, 2019, found that a large number of people were opposed to the plan. Staff have received 47 written submissions against the project and a petition signed by 76 people objecting to the development.

Danko lashed out at the developer for bypassing the municipality and going straight to the appeals tribunal to try to get the application approved.

“It is really unfair to the residents,” said Danko.

Residents were concerned about possible increases in traffic, parking problems, the site servicing capacity, over development of the site and compatibility of having a nine-storey tower beside existing single-family homes.



Hamilton developer appeals 9-storey plan for Stone Church Road on Mountain

Developer takes plan to Local Appeal Planning Tribunal over council's non-decision

News Oct 23, 2020 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Hamilton Mountain Coun. John-Paul Danko was “disappointed” that Valeri Construction Limited is filing an appeal to permit a proposed nine-storey, 209-unit residential development at the corner of Stone Church Road and West 5th Street because council has taken too long to approve the application.

“We were working with Valeri,” said Danko. “It is really disappointing for me as the ward councillor, and very disappointing for the ward residents who participated in this process.”

Valeri Construction Limited had sent a letter to the city on July 30, 2020 stating council had yet to adopt an official plan amendment for the property within 120 days of the application identified as completed. The owner is appealing the non-decision to the Local Appeal Planning Tribunal. City staff had identified the application as complete on May 23, 2019. Since the initial application for the rezoning application, 465 days have gone by.

“Our client is of the opinion that the applications as submitted are consistent with the Provincial Policy Statement 2014,” stated Russell Cheeseman, lawyer for Valeri Construction Ltd.

But Danko said city staff had been actively engaged with the owner to shape the application to properly fit the unusual, 0.8-hectare property. It is bounded by Stone Church Road West to the north, St. Mary’s Assyrian Church to the east, a currently vacant lot that has received site plan approval for a retirement facility to the south, and West 5th Street to the west.

“We were working with that applicant to try to (make it) more sympathetic to the surrounding area,” said city planner James Van Rooi. “However, as those discussions transpired it was clear we were just on different sides of the fence.”

Van Rooi told a recent planning committee meeting that the developer had first submitted a 237-unit residential development that included a 10-storey building with 70 surface parking spaces and 171 underground parking spots. City staff opposed the proposal since it provided “little” buffering and there was a lack of setbacks between the residential homes and neighbouring lands to the north, east and west. Staff also had problems with the height and “mass” of the building.

On Feb. 20, 2020 a revised application was provided to the city that proposed 226-residential units in a 10-storey building, with 59 surface parking lots and 167 underground spaces. The plan had adequate setback requirements, but staff still had “concerns with the design and impact of massing and height” for the property.

A third submission, on June 17, 2020, proposed a 216-unit residential development in a nine-storey building with 54 surface parking spaces and 243 underground spots.

“Although this proposal reduced the height, the building footprint was increased,” stated planning staff.

The setbacks had been reduced, and the height and “massing remained an issue.”

Van Rooi said within the area there are only single-family homes and four-storey institutional buildings. Upper James, which is a block over, has the next highest buildings at six storeys.

“All of a sudden we are facing this development proposal of 10 storeys, with a density that is double to what is appropriate,” he said.

A public meeting, held Sept. 19, 2019, found that a large number of people were opposed to the plan. Staff have received 47 written submissions against the project and a petition signed by 76 people objecting to the development.

Danko lashed out at the developer for bypassing the municipality and going straight to the appeals tribunal to try to get the application approved.

“It is really unfair to the residents,” said Danko.

Residents were concerned about possible increases in traffic, parking problems, the site servicing capacity, over development of the site and compatibility of having a nine-storey tower beside existing single-family homes.