Hamilton Mountain's Long and Bisby building addition demolished

News Oct 14, 2020 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Valery (Chedoke Browlands) Development received a demolition permit from Hamilton’s building department to remove an addition to the historical Long and Bisby building that had been damaged by fire earlier this year.

Planning general manager Jason Thorne said at the Oct. 14 planning meeting that staff had “agreed with the applicant there was no heritage value based on that addition out back. That had to be removed.”

Thorne said staff took an unusual step of having the building inspector and heritage planner on site during the demolition to make sure the main structure wasn’t impacted by the work.

“Nothing of heritage significance (was) impacted by that demolition,” said Mountain Coun. Terry Whitehead.

The demolition permit was issued Sept. 30 to remove the fire-damaged addition at the rear of the building, located at 828 Sanatorium Rd. The cost of the work was pegged at $20,000.

The Long and Bisby building is the last remaining structure of the former Mountain Sanatorium complex. It was constructed in 1920 as a nurse’s residence on the grounds of the Mountain Sanatorium and later Chedoke Hospital.

It was named after W.D. Long and Mrs. George H. Bisby, who donated the land for the sanatorium in 1906, and was the fourth sanatorium to be built in Canada to treat tuberculosis.

Prompted by historical activists, councillors approved a motion introduced by Whitehead at the July 17 council meeting, to install a series of security measures, including an eight-foot-high fence to encircle the property, a motion-activated lighting system, a contact number for people to call if they see any vandalism, and the installation of plywood cladding for all windows and doors.

Whitehead, who has fielded calls from residents and has seen the social media posts that indicated a portion of the building was being demolished, chided the public for its accusatory tone.

“Unfortunately on social media nothing is true, and everything becomes manufactured and made up,” he said. “Everything that could be done prior to the security fence was done.”

Whitehead has said city officials and his staff have been overseeing the information provided by residents about the state of the building for nearly a year in an effort to protect the structure from further vandalism. All information provided to his office is forwarded to the city’s bylaw enforcement staff.

Thorne said Valery Homes is expected to announce plans for an adaptive reuse and restoration of the building.

“We are expecting something soon,” he said.

A message left with Valery Homes seeking comment was not returned by the time this article was completed.

Councillors have yet to endorse a heritage committee recommendation to designate the property. Instead, for the second time in July, they referred the committee’s recommendation to designate the property to a future planning committee meeting to allow Valery Homes representatives a chance to discuss the building’s future.

In 2018, the heritage committee recommended the building be designated. It is currently on the city’s list of heritage buildings of cultural value. The recommendation was prompted by the owner’s plans to demolish the building.

Valery Homes purchased the property in 2012 from Deanlee Management Inc. In January 2018, the owner submitted a formal consultation application to the city to develop the lands that included 764 multiple residential units and 110 townhouse units.

 

 

 

City issues demolition permit to remove fire-damaged addition behind Hamilton Mountain's Long and Bisby building

News Oct 14, 2020 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Valery (Chedoke Browlands) Development received a demolition permit from Hamilton’s building department to remove an addition to the historical Long and Bisby building that had been damaged by fire earlier this year.

Planning general manager Jason Thorne said at the Oct. 14 planning meeting that staff had “agreed with the applicant there was no heritage value based on that addition out back. That had to be removed.”

Thorne said staff took an unusual step of having the building inspector and heritage planner on site during the demolition to make sure the main structure wasn’t impacted by the work.

“Nothing of heritage significance (was) impacted by that demolition,” said Mountain Coun. Terry Whitehead.

Related Content

The demolition permit was issued Sept. 30 to remove the fire-damaged addition at the rear of the building, located at 828 Sanatorium Rd. The cost of the work was pegged at $20,000.

The Long and Bisby building is the last remaining structure of the former Mountain Sanatorium complex. It was constructed in 1920 as a nurse’s residence on the grounds of the Mountain Sanatorium and later Chedoke Hospital.

It was named after W.D. Long and Mrs. George H. Bisby, who donated the land for the sanatorium in 1906, and was the fourth sanatorium to be built in Canada to treat tuberculosis.

Prompted by historical activists, councillors approved a motion introduced by Whitehead at the July 17 council meeting, to install a series of security measures, including an eight-foot-high fence to encircle the property, a motion-activated lighting system, a contact number for people to call if they see any vandalism, and the installation of plywood cladding for all windows and doors.

Whitehead, who has fielded calls from residents and has seen the social media posts that indicated a portion of the building was being demolished, chided the public for its accusatory tone.

“Unfortunately on social media nothing is true, and everything becomes manufactured and made up,” he said. “Everything that could be done prior to the security fence was done.”

Whitehead has said city officials and his staff have been overseeing the information provided by residents about the state of the building for nearly a year in an effort to protect the structure from further vandalism. All information provided to his office is forwarded to the city’s bylaw enforcement staff.

Thorne said Valery Homes is expected to announce plans for an adaptive reuse and restoration of the building.

“We are expecting something soon,” he said.

A message left with Valery Homes seeking comment was not returned by the time this article was completed.

Councillors have yet to endorse a heritage committee recommendation to designate the property. Instead, for the second time in July, they referred the committee’s recommendation to designate the property to a future planning committee meeting to allow Valery Homes representatives a chance to discuss the building’s future.

In 2018, the heritage committee recommended the building be designated. It is currently on the city’s list of heritage buildings of cultural value. The recommendation was prompted by the owner’s plans to demolish the building.

Valery Homes purchased the property in 2012 from Deanlee Management Inc. In January 2018, the owner submitted a formal consultation application to the city to develop the lands that included 764 multiple residential units and 110 townhouse units.

 

 

 

City issues demolition permit to remove fire-damaged addition behind Hamilton Mountain's Long and Bisby building

News Oct 14, 2020 by Kevin Werner Hamilton Mountain News

Valery (Chedoke Browlands) Development received a demolition permit from Hamilton’s building department to remove an addition to the historical Long and Bisby building that had been damaged by fire earlier this year.

Planning general manager Jason Thorne said at the Oct. 14 planning meeting that staff had “agreed with the applicant there was no heritage value based on that addition out back. That had to be removed.”

Thorne said staff took an unusual step of having the building inspector and heritage planner on site during the demolition to make sure the main structure wasn’t impacted by the work.

“Nothing of heritage significance (was) impacted by that demolition,” said Mountain Coun. Terry Whitehead.

Related Content

The demolition permit was issued Sept. 30 to remove the fire-damaged addition at the rear of the building, located at 828 Sanatorium Rd. The cost of the work was pegged at $20,000.

The Long and Bisby building is the last remaining structure of the former Mountain Sanatorium complex. It was constructed in 1920 as a nurse’s residence on the grounds of the Mountain Sanatorium and later Chedoke Hospital.

It was named after W.D. Long and Mrs. George H. Bisby, who donated the land for the sanatorium in 1906, and was the fourth sanatorium to be built in Canada to treat tuberculosis.

Prompted by historical activists, councillors approved a motion introduced by Whitehead at the July 17 council meeting, to install a series of security measures, including an eight-foot-high fence to encircle the property, a motion-activated lighting system, a contact number for people to call if they see any vandalism, and the installation of plywood cladding for all windows and doors.

Whitehead, who has fielded calls from residents and has seen the social media posts that indicated a portion of the building was being demolished, chided the public for its accusatory tone.

“Unfortunately on social media nothing is true, and everything becomes manufactured and made up,” he said. “Everything that could be done prior to the security fence was done.”

Whitehead has said city officials and his staff have been overseeing the information provided by residents about the state of the building for nearly a year in an effort to protect the structure from further vandalism. All information provided to his office is forwarded to the city’s bylaw enforcement staff.

Thorne said Valery Homes is expected to announce plans for an adaptive reuse and restoration of the building.

“We are expecting something soon,” he said.

A message left with Valery Homes seeking comment was not returned by the time this article was completed.

Councillors have yet to endorse a heritage committee recommendation to designate the property. Instead, for the second time in July, they referred the committee’s recommendation to designate the property to a future planning committee meeting to allow Valery Homes representatives a chance to discuss the building’s future.

In 2018, the heritage committee recommended the building be designated. It is currently on the city’s list of heritage buildings of cultural value. The recommendation was prompted by the owner’s plans to demolish the building.

Valery Homes purchased the property in 2012 from Deanlee Management Inc. In January 2018, the owner submitted a formal consultation application to the city to develop the lands that included 764 multiple residential units and 110 townhouse units.