Dundas Pleasant View property owner dismantles building

News Sep 18, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Several new policies have been implemented by the City of Hamilton building department in response to staff errors that resulted in an incorrectly issued building permit for 10 Newman Rd. in Pleasant View.

The city reached a settlement with property owner Marco Zwaan, 13 months after the permit for the partially completed home was revoked.

The settlement included the city buying the property from Zwaan, demolishing the structure and returning the property to its natural state. City staff said all settlement costs will be funded by building permits, not the general tax levy.

But, after receiving a demolition permit from the city on Sept. 10, Zwaan dismantled most of the structure by Sept. 14, removing much of the building material. Because the property has not yet been transferred to the city, Zwaan still owns it.

“The windows were sold and the proceeds donated to Habitat for Humanity,” Zwaan said. “The wood structure was dismantled and the materials will be repurposed in the future.”

Zwaan said he takes seriously issues around material and energy used to construct the house.

“To just demo this all would make the negative impact on the environment enormous, besides all the waste of money, time and energy which has already happened,” he said. City spokesperson Allison Jones said as of Sept. 15 no sale closing date had been set.

Pleasant View resident Peter Hurrell took photos on the last day of demolition.

“It looks more like careful dismantling than demolition,” he said.

Neighbour Caroline Thomson said she was happy to see the structure come down, and noted the people doing the work spent a full day sorting wood and pulling nails out.

“Great that it’s not all going to landfill,” she said.

In a report titled 'Development Applications in the Pleasant View Neighbourhood’ going to city council’s general issues committee on Sept. 23, building division staffer Jorge Caetano summarizes six actions taken to avoid future errors, like the incorrect use of a planning exemption to approve the 10 Newman development last year.

These actions include:

Requirement for staff to use up-to-date zoning bylaws accessed online instead of using paper records;

A notice being placed on every Pleasant View property record in the city database used by planning and building staff, advising of development restrictions;

A new residential zoning expert has been added to the building division;

Staff are now required to notify the Niagara Escarpment Commission of any building permit and zoning verification applications in Pleasant View and to request commission comments on Pleasant View planning applications;

A new policy that provides guidance on how to apply and interpret exception zone requirements;

Working with the Niagara Escarpment Commission to resolve conflicts between the Niagara Escarpment Plan and city zoning bylaws and to bring Pleasant View into commission development control.

Dundas Pleasant View property owner dismantles building

City implements new policies in response to staff errors

News Sep 18, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Several new policies have been implemented by the City of Hamilton building department in response to staff errors that resulted in an incorrectly issued building permit for 10 Newman Rd. in Pleasant View.

The city reached a settlement with property owner Marco Zwaan, 13 months after the permit for the partially completed home was revoked.

The settlement included the city buying the property from Zwaan, demolishing the structure and returning the property to its natural state. City staff said all settlement costs will be funded by building permits, not the general tax levy.

But, after receiving a demolition permit from the city on Sept. 10, Zwaan dismantled most of the structure by Sept. 14, removing much of the building material. Because the property has not yet been transferred to the city, Zwaan still owns it.

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“The windows were sold and the proceeds donated to Habitat for Humanity,” Zwaan said. “The wood structure was dismantled and the materials will be repurposed in the future.”

Zwaan said he takes seriously issues around material and energy used to construct the house.

“To just demo this all would make the negative impact on the environment enormous, besides all the waste of money, time and energy which has already happened,” he said. City spokesperson Allison Jones said as of Sept. 15 no sale closing date had been set.

Pleasant View resident Peter Hurrell took photos on the last day of demolition.

“It looks more like careful dismantling than demolition,” he said.

Neighbour Caroline Thomson said she was happy to see the structure come down, and noted the people doing the work spent a full day sorting wood and pulling nails out.

“Great that it’s not all going to landfill,” she said.

In a report titled 'Development Applications in the Pleasant View Neighbourhood’ going to city council’s general issues committee on Sept. 23, building division staffer Jorge Caetano summarizes six actions taken to avoid future errors, like the incorrect use of a planning exemption to approve the 10 Newman development last year.

These actions include:

Requirement for staff to use up-to-date zoning bylaws accessed online instead of using paper records;

A notice being placed on every Pleasant View property record in the city database used by planning and building staff, advising of development restrictions;

A new residential zoning expert has been added to the building division;

Staff are now required to notify the Niagara Escarpment Commission of any building permit and zoning verification applications in Pleasant View and to request commission comments on Pleasant View planning applications;

A new policy that provides guidance on how to apply and interpret exception zone requirements;

Working with the Niagara Escarpment Commission to resolve conflicts between the Niagara Escarpment Plan and city zoning bylaws and to bring Pleasant View into commission development control.

Dundas Pleasant View property owner dismantles building

City implements new policies in response to staff errors

News Sep 18, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Several new policies have been implemented by the City of Hamilton building department in response to staff errors that resulted in an incorrectly issued building permit for 10 Newman Rd. in Pleasant View.

The city reached a settlement with property owner Marco Zwaan, 13 months after the permit for the partially completed home was revoked.

The settlement included the city buying the property from Zwaan, demolishing the structure and returning the property to its natural state. City staff said all settlement costs will be funded by building permits, not the general tax levy.

But, after receiving a demolition permit from the city on Sept. 10, Zwaan dismantled most of the structure by Sept. 14, removing much of the building material. Because the property has not yet been transferred to the city, Zwaan still owns it.

Related Content

“The windows were sold and the proceeds donated to Habitat for Humanity,” Zwaan said. “The wood structure was dismantled and the materials will be repurposed in the future.”

Zwaan said he takes seriously issues around material and energy used to construct the house.

“To just demo this all would make the negative impact on the environment enormous, besides all the waste of money, time and energy which has already happened,” he said. City spokesperson Allison Jones said as of Sept. 15 no sale closing date had been set.

Pleasant View resident Peter Hurrell took photos on the last day of demolition.

“It looks more like careful dismantling than demolition,” he said.

Neighbour Caroline Thomson said she was happy to see the structure come down, and noted the people doing the work spent a full day sorting wood and pulling nails out.

“Great that it’s not all going to landfill,” she said.

In a report titled 'Development Applications in the Pleasant View Neighbourhood’ going to city council’s general issues committee on Sept. 23, building division staffer Jorge Caetano summarizes six actions taken to avoid future errors, like the incorrect use of a planning exemption to approve the 10 Newman development last year.

These actions include:

Requirement for staff to use up-to-date zoning bylaws accessed online instead of using paper records;

A notice being placed on every Pleasant View property record in the city database used by planning and building staff, advising of development restrictions;

A new residential zoning expert has been added to the building division;

Staff are now required to notify the Niagara Escarpment Commission of any building permit and zoning verification applications in Pleasant View and to request commission comments on Pleasant View planning applications;

A new policy that provides guidance on how to apply and interpret exception zone requirements;

Working with the Niagara Escarpment Commission to resolve conflicts between the Niagara Escarpment Plan and city zoning bylaws and to bring Pleasant View into commission development control.