Stoney Creek Coun. Maria Pearson opposed revised development

News Sep 10, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s planning committee has rejected an attempt by a developer to increase the size of a Stoney Creek condominium project after an original scaled-down proposal was approved three years ago.

LJM Developments had originally received the green light in 2017 by council to build a $50-million, six-storey, 93-unit condominium project at 325 Hwy. 8.

Getting the six-storey project approved had been a struggle since the initial plan called for 12 storeys and 148 units at the busy corner, with an elementary school and church located across the street. Area residents balked at the size of the initial development, prompting LJM Developments’ owner Liaquat Mian, of Burlington, to offer a nine-storey development instead. He eventually agreed to the six storeys, on a property with a height restriction of three storeys.

But after three years of trying to sell the condominiums, Mian reversed course and proposed an 11-storey, 148-unit development.

John Ariens, of the IBI Group, representing LJM Developments, told the Sept. 8 planning committee the six-storey project was “too risky.”

He said, over the last three years, the economy has changed and “the market took a severe turn."

“The building process has gone through the roof,” said Ariens. “Construction has been delayed. As a consequence, the project is no longer viable. Hence, we are before you seeking an increase in the height.”

Ariens said the proposal would be located at a “prominent” corner in Stoney Creek that will “help create a new landmark location.”

But councillors were not buying the proposal.

Stoney Creek Coun. Maria Pearson, who has a track record of supporting development proposals, said she couldn’t back the larger building.

“This is the first time I have gone against a developer I have been able to work with and come to a consensus,” she said.

She said the six-storey development “barely” fits the property, but she could back the plan. There were some residents staunchly opposed to the 12-storey development, but they also reluctantly backed the project.

Ariens said the density increase “really isn’t huge” and argued, essentially, it is “only” a two-storey height increase over what the current plans allow.

Residents in a townhouse complex at Ellington Avenue  behind the proposed development  were concerned about parking, fencing, noise and dust resulting from construction.

“They recognized something has to go on this corner,” said Pearson.

Pearson said when council approved the six-storey plan, and it wasn’t appealed to the Ontario Municipal Board, she was “thrilled.”

But the 11-storey proposal is “absolutely too intense” for the neighbourhood, said Pearson.

The development would be beside the seven-storey Treviso Condominiums, which has 54 units.

“There is a nursing home across the street. There are townhouses behind (the development). This piece of property will have almost double the units to Treviso’s tower,” said Pearson. “The compatibility is number one in this issue. I cannot support this particular project.”

Councillors are slated to vote on the committee’s recommendation at their Sept. 16 meeting.

Mian has already constructed a Grimsby condominium development on North Service Road, called Waterview Condominiums, that can be prominently seen from the QEW and has spurred economic growth in the community. Mian also has a development proposed on Barton Street that will have 211 residential units.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: We have been following this development proposal closely since 2016, when residents remained opposed to a scaled-back proposal for a six-storey condominium building.

Hamilton's planning committee rejects revised 11-storey development for Stoney Creek

News Sep 10, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s planning committee has rejected an attempt by a developer to increase the size of a Stoney Creek condominium project after an original scaled-down proposal was approved three years ago.

LJM Developments had originally received the green light in 2017 by council to build a $50-million, six-storey, 93-unit condominium project at 325 Hwy. 8.

Getting the six-storey project approved had been a struggle since the initial plan called for 12 storeys and 148 units at the busy corner, with an elementary school and church located across the street. Area residents balked at the size of the initial development, prompting LJM Developments’ owner Liaquat Mian, of Burlington, to offer a nine-storey development instead. He eventually agreed to the six storeys, on a property with a height restriction of three storeys.

But after three years of trying to sell the condominiums, Mian reversed course and proposed an 11-storey, 148-unit development.

John Ariens, of the IBI Group, representing LJM Developments, told the Sept. 8 planning committee the six-storey project was “too risky.”

He said, over the last three years, the economy has changed and “the market took a severe turn."

“The building process has gone through the roof,” said Ariens. “Construction has been delayed. As a consequence, the project is no longer viable. Hence, we are before you seeking an increase in the height.”

Ariens said the proposal would be located at a “prominent” corner in Stoney Creek that will “help create a new landmark location.”

But councillors were not buying the proposal.

Stoney Creek Coun. Maria Pearson, who has a track record of supporting development proposals, said she couldn’t back the larger building.

“This is the first time I have gone against a developer I have been able to work with and come to a consensus,” she said.

She said the six-storey development “barely” fits the property, but she could back the plan. There were some residents staunchly opposed to the 12-storey development, but they also reluctantly backed the project.

Ariens said the density increase “really isn’t huge” and argued, essentially, it is “only” a two-storey height increase over what the current plans allow.

Residents in a townhouse complex at Ellington Avenue  behind the proposed development  were concerned about parking, fencing, noise and dust resulting from construction.

“They recognized something has to go on this corner,” said Pearson.

Pearson said when council approved the six-storey plan, and it wasn’t appealed to the Ontario Municipal Board, she was “thrilled.”

But the 11-storey proposal is “absolutely too intense” for the neighbourhood, said Pearson.

The development would be beside the seven-storey Treviso Condominiums, which has 54 units.

“There is a nursing home across the street. There are townhouses behind (the development). This piece of property will have almost double the units to Treviso’s tower,” said Pearson. “The compatibility is number one in this issue. I cannot support this particular project.”

Councillors are slated to vote on the committee’s recommendation at their Sept. 16 meeting.

Mian has already constructed a Grimsby condominium development on North Service Road, called Waterview Condominiums, that can be prominently seen from the QEW and has spurred economic growth in the community. Mian also has a development proposed on Barton Street that will have 211 residential units.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: We have been following this development proposal closely since 2016, when residents remained opposed to a scaled-back proposal for a six-storey condominium building.

Hamilton's planning committee rejects revised 11-storey development for Stoney Creek

News Sep 10, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton’s planning committee has rejected an attempt by a developer to increase the size of a Stoney Creek condominium project after an original scaled-down proposal was approved three years ago.

LJM Developments had originally received the green light in 2017 by council to build a $50-million, six-storey, 93-unit condominium project at 325 Hwy. 8.

Getting the six-storey project approved had been a struggle since the initial plan called for 12 storeys and 148 units at the busy corner, with an elementary school and church located across the street. Area residents balked at the size of the initial development, prompting LJM Developments’ owner Liaquat Mian, of Burlington, to offer a nine-storey development instead. He eventually agreed to the six storeys, on a property with a height restriction of three storeys.

But after three years of trying to sell the condominiums, Mian reversed course and proposed an 11-storey, 148-unit development.

John Ariens, of the IBI Group, representing LJM Developments, told the Sept. 8 planning committee the six-storey project was “too risky.”

He said, over the last three years, the economy has changed and “the market took a severe turn."

“The building process has gone through the roof,” said Ariens. “Construction has been delayed. As a consequence, the project is no longer viable. Hence, we are before you seeking an increase in the height.”

Ariens said the proposal would be located at a “prominent” corner in Stoney Creek that will “help create a new landmark location.”

But councillors were not buying the proposal.

Stoney Creek Coun. Maria Pearson, who has a track record of supporting development proposals, said she couldn’t back the larger building.

“This is the first time I have gone against a developer I have been able to work with and come to a consensus,” she said.

She said the six-storey development “barely” fits the property, but she could back the plan. There were some residents staunchly opposed to the 12-storey development, but they also reluctantly backed the project.

Ariens said the density increase “really isn’t huge” and argued, essentially, it is “only” a two-storey height increase over what the current plans allow.

Residents in a townhouse complex at Ellington Avenue  behind the proposed development  were concerned about parking, fencing, noise and dust resulting from construction.

“They recognized something has to go on this corner,” said Pearson.

Pearson said when council approved the six-storey plan, and it wasn’t appealed to the Ontario Municipal Board, she was “thrilled.”

But the 11-storey proposal is “absolutely too intense” for the neighbourhood, said Pearson.

The development would be beside the seven-storey Treviso Condominiums, which has 54 units.

“There is a nursing home across the street. There are townhouses behind (the development). This piece of property will have almost double the units to Treviso’s tower,” said Pearson. “The compatibility is number one in this issue. I cannot support this particular project.”

Councillors are slated to vote on the committee’s recommendation at their Sept. 16 meeting.

Mian has already constructed a Grimsby condominium development on North Service Road, called Waterview Condominiums, that can be prominently seen from the QEW and has spurred economic growth in the community. Mian also has a development proposed on Barton Street that will have 211 residential units.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: We have been following this development proposal closely since 2016, when residents remained opposed to a scaled-back proposal for a six-storey condominium building.