Dundas Pleasant View’s 10 Newman Rd. neighbours support plan

News Aug 27, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Although they would have preferred the error was never made to begin with, several Dundas neighbours are pleased the city agreed to purchase the 10 Newman Rd. property, demolish a structure the city had mistakenly approved, and rehabilitate the land to its previous condition as a key natural link between Cootes Paradise and the Niagara Escarpment.

Important next steps neighbours would like to see, though, include quick removal of fencing surrounding the site, getting the building removed before the spring nesting season, and finding a Cootes to Escarpment EcoPark partner to oversee its rehabilitation and long-term protection.

“We’re just grateful to have this back,” said Caroline Thomson. “I am of course thrilled that things will be restored back to the way they were. This link is integral to the safer passage of wildlife.”

Hamilton city council passed a motion on Friday, August 21, following months of negotiation and mediation with 10 Newman Rd. owner Marco Zwaan, to approve a settlement agreement.

City planning and building staff approved site plan and building permit applications last year to permit the structure, in contradiction of local zoning and official plan rules — and provincial planning policy. The permit was revoked after three months.

An Ontario Municipal Board decision and the Niagara Escarpment Plan restrict development in the Pleasant View special policy area to minimum 10 hectare (25 acre) lots. At 4.07 hectares, 10 Newman Rd. cannot be developed and cannot be rezoned for development.

City of Hamilton spokesperson Allison Jones said August 27 transfer of the property was not expected for at least a couple of weeks.

The council motion directs city costs associated with settlement, acquisition, demolition and restoration be charged to its Building Permit Revenue Stabilization Reserve.

Jones said the reserve had a balance of $23.5-million at the end of 2019. She said it’s a required fund maintained for administration of the Building Code Act, and offsets unforeseen expenditures.

Jones said the reserve is funded “from building permit fees only.”

That suggests no taxpayer money will be used for the settlement, and related projects, but council has directed settlement details remain confidential.

Hamilton Community News has filed a municipal freedom of information request for two related staff reports.

Residents are happy this stage is completed, and say the city is doing the right thing. But next steps are important.

“I am very glad the sorry affair is coming to an end,” said Peter Hurrell. “The fact the city will end up with the property does not fill me with confidence.”

He said he’d rather see it go to the EcoPark — whose partners already own property surrounding 10 Newman Rd.

“They have the time, interest and expertise to turn that property into a small wildlife refuge, as they are doing with the Hopkins Tract on Old Guelph Road,” Hurrell said.

Fellow Pleasant View resident Kris Robinson agreed.

“To ensure this property is protected in the future, I suggest the property be transferred to the Royal Botanical Gardens,” Robinson said.

She said she hopes city building and planning staff will really look at all zoning and building applications in the future.

“The fence should come down first, as soon as possible,” Robinson said.

Joanna Chapman said she hopes Caroline Thomson, a neighbour of 10 Newman, will be invited by the city, or other EcoPark partners, to participate in rehabilitation.

“My main concern would be to ensure that the site can once again be used safely by wildlife,” Chapman said.

She also hopes city building and planning departments will be more careful when they issue permits — in Pleasant View and city-wide.

Tomasz Wiercioch, Cootes to Escarpment EcoPark system co-ordinator at the Royal Botanical Gardens, said he’s not aware of any partners — including the RBG, Halton and Hamilton conservation authorities, Hamilton Naturalists’ Club and McMaster University — discussing any potential involvement with the property’s rehabilitation.

The city has not yet closed the property purchase, so it may be waiting to start rehabilitation planning and consult EcoPark partners.

Wiercioch said 10 Newman falls in the EcoPark’s Borer’s Falls-Rock Chapel Heritage Land — an area containing part of the largest area of undisturbed forest habitat within the EcoPark corridor.

It’s the centre of an area recognized for provincially and nationally significant plant and wildlife diversity.

“(The EcoPark) supports any possible addition to the natural green space in the Pleasant View Survey as it benefits local biodiversity and improves important wildlife corridor links between the Niagara Escarpment and Lake Ontario watershed,” Wiercioch said.

He said EcoPark partners have collaborated on naturalization of each other’s land, and intend to continue working together — but he’s not aware of any partners exploring opportunities for 10 Newman Rd., despite Hamilton City Council passing a motion to do so.

Wierioch said the City of Hamilton is an EcoPark partner.

Caroline Thomson hopes to play a role in the property’s rehabilitation.

“I’d like to see it filled with things that support wildlife,” she said. “This is a small corridor that happens to be integral.”

She said the property represents the EcoPark’s goals — creating and protecting a natural link from Cootes Paradise to the Niagara Escarpment.

“It needs to be protected forever,” Thomson said. “The best thing in my opinion that could happen to this land is that it be included in the EcoPark footprint and forever protected.”

Cootes Paradise is recognized as a National Historic Site, Nationally Important Bird Area, and an Important Amphibian Area. The Niagara Escarpment is a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve

Several layers of restrictive planning and development policy in Pleasant View were intended to protect and preserve the link between the two significant areas.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: We broke news of a 10 Newman Rd. settlement that includes the City of Hamilton buying the property and wanted to understand some of the early impacts.

Dundas Pleasant View’s 10 Newman Rd. neighbours support plan

Settlement, demolition and related projects funded by building permit fees

News Aug 27, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Although they would have preferred the error was never made to begin with, several Dundas neighbours are pleased the city agreed to purchase the 10 Newman Rd. property, demolish a structure the city had mistakenly approved, and rehabilitate the land to its previous condition as a key natural link between Cootes Paradise and the Niagara Escarpment.

Important next steps neighbours would like to see, though, include quick removal of fencing surrounding the site, getting the building removed before the spring nesting season, and finding a Cootes to Escarpment EcoPark partner to oversee its rehabilitation and long-term protection.

“We’re just grateful to have this back,” said Caroline Thomson. “I am of course thrilled that things will be restored back to the way they were. This link is integral to the safer passage of wildlife.”

Hamilton city council passed a motion on Friday, August 21, following months of negotiation and mediation with 10 Newman Rd. owner Marco Zwaan, to approve a settlement agreement.

Related Content

City planning and building staff approved site plan and building permit applications last year to permit the structure, in contradiction of local zoning and official plan rules — and provincial planning policy. The permit was revoked after three months.

An Ontario Municipal Board decision and the Niagara Escarpment Plan restrict development in the Pleasant View special policy area to minimum 10 hectare (25 acre) lots. At 4.07 hectares, 10 Newman Rd. cannot be developed and cannot be rezoned for development.

City of Hamilton spokesperson Allison Jones said August 27 transfer of the property was not expected for at least a couple of weeks.

The council motion directs city costs associated with settlement, acquisition, demolition and restoration be charged to its Building Permit Revenue Stabilization Reserve.

Jones said the reserve had a balance of $23.5-million at the end of 2019. She said it’s a required fund maintained for administration of the Building Code Act, and offsets unforeseen expenditures.

Jones said the reserve is funded “from building permit fees only.”

That suggests no taxpayer money will be used for the settlement, and related projects, but council has directed settlement details remain confidential.

Hamilton Community News has filed a municipal freedom of information request for two related staff reports.

Residents are happy this stage is completed, and say the city is doing the right thing. But next steps are important.

“I am very glad the sorry affair is coming to an end,” said Peter Hurrell. “The fact the city will end up with the property does not fill me with confidence.”

He said he’d rather see it go to the EcoPark — whose partners already own property surrounding 10 Newman Rd.

“They have the time, interest and expertise to turn that property into a small wildlife refuge, as they are doing with the Hopkins Tract on Old Guelph Road,” Hurrell said.

Fellow Pleasant View resident Kris Robinson agreed.

“To ensure this property is protected in the future, I suggest the property be transferred to the Royal Botanical Gardens,” Robinson said.

She said she hopes city building and planning staff will really look at all zoning and building applications in the future.

“The fence should come down first, as soon as possible,” Robinson said.

Joanna Chapman said she hopes Caroline Thomson, a neighbour of 10 Newman, will be invited by the city, or other EcoPark partners, to participate in rehabilitation.

“My main concern would be to ensure that the site can once again be used safely by wildlife,” Chapman said.

She also hopes city building and planning departments will be more careful when they issue permits — in Pleasant View and city-wide.

Tomasz Wiercioch, Cootes to Escarpment EcoPark system co-ordinator at the Royal Botanical Gardens, said he’s not aware of any partners — including the RBG, Halton and Hamilton conservation authorities, Hamilton Naturalists’ Club and McMaster University — discussing any potential involvement with the property’s rehabilitation.

The city has not yet closed the property purchase, so it may be waiting to start rehabilitation planning and consult EcoPark partners.

Wiercioch said 10 Newman falls in the EcoPark’s Borer’s Falls-Rock Chapel Heritage Land — an area containing part of the largest area of undisturbed forest habitat within the EcoPark corridor.

It’s the centre of an area recognized for provincially and nationally significant plant and wildlife diversity.

“(The EcoPark) supports any possible addition to the natural green space in the Pleasant View Survey as it benefits local biodiversity and improves important wildlife corridor links between the Niagara Escarpment and Lake Ontario watershed,” Wiercioch said.

He said EcoPark partners have collaborated on naturalization of each other’s land, and intend to continue working together — but he’s not aware of any partners exploring opportunities for 10 Newman Rd., despite Hamilton City Council passing a motion to do so.

Wierioch said the City of Hamilton is an EcoPark partner.

Caroline Thomson hopes to play a role in the property’s rehabilitation.

“I’d like to see it filled with things that support wildlife,” she said. “This is a small corridor that happens to be integral.”

She said the property represents the EcoPark’s goals — creating and protecting a natural link from Cootes Paradise to the Niagara Escarpment.

“It needs to be protected forever,” Thomson said. “The best thing in my opinion that could happen to this land is that it be included in the EcoPark footprint and forever protected.”

Cootes Paradise is recognized as a National Historic Site, Nationally Important Bird Area, and an Important Amphibian Area. The Niagara Escarpment is a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve

Several layers of restrictive planning and development policy in Pleasant View were intended to protect and preserve the link between the two significant areas.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: We broke news of a 10 Newman Rd. settlement that includes the City of Hamilton buying the property and wanted to understand some of the early impacts.

Dundas Pleasant View’s 10 Newman Rd. neighbours support plan

Settlement, demolition and related projects funded by building permit fees

News Aug 27, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

Although they would have preferred the error was never made to begin with, several Dundas neighbours are pleased the city agreed to purchase the 10 Newman Rd. property, demolish a structure the city had mistakenly approved, and rehabilitate the land to its previous condition as a key natural link between Cootes Paradise and the Niagara Escarpment.

Important next steps neighbours would like to see, though, include quick removal of fencing surrounding the site, getting the building removed before the spring nesting season, and finding a Cootes to Escarpment EcoPark partner to oversee its rehabilitation and long-term protection.

“We’re just grateful to have this back,” said Caroline Thomson. “I am of course thrilled that things will be restored back to the way they were. This link is integral to the safer passage of wildlife.”

Hamilton city council passed a motion on Friday, August 21, following months of negotiation and mediation with 10 Newman Rd. owner Marco Zwaan, to approve a settlement agreement.

Related Content

City planning and building staff approved site plan and building permit applications last year to permit the structure, in contradiction of local zoning and official plan rules — and provincial planning policy. The permit was revoked after three months.

An Ontario Municipal Board decision and the Niagara Escarpment Plan restrict development in the Pleasant View special policy area to minimum 10 hectare (25 acre) lots. At 4.07 hectares, 10 Newman Rd. cannot be developed and cannot be rezoned for development.

City of Hamilton spokesperson Allison Jones said August 27 transfer of the property was not expected for at least a couple of weeks.

The council motion directs city costs associated with settlement, acquisition, demolition and restoration be charged to its Building Permit Revenue Stabilization Reserve.

Jones said the reserve had a balance of $23.5-million at the end of 2019. She said it’s a required fund maintained for administration of the Building Code Act, and offsets unforeseen expenditures.

Jones said the reserve is funded “from building permit fees only.”

That suggests no taxpayer money will be used for the settlement, and related projects, but council has directed settlement details remain confidential.

Hamilton Community News has filed a municipal freedom of information request for two related staff reports.

Residents are happy this stage is completed, and say the city is doing the right thing. But next steps are important.

“I am very glad the sorry affair is coming to an end,” said Peter Hurrell. “The fact the city will end up with the property does not fill me with confidence.”

He said he’d rather see it go to the EcoPark — whose partners already own property surrounding 10 Newman Rd.

“They have the time, interest and expertise to turn that property into a small wildlife refuge, as they are doing with the Hopkins Tract on Old Guelph Road,” Hurrell said.

Fellow Pleasant View resident Kris Robinson agreed.

“To ensure this property is protected in the future, I suggest the property be transferred to the Royal Botanical Gardens,” Robinson said.

She said she hopes city building and planning staff will really look at all zoning and building applications in the future.

“The fence should come down first, as soon as possible,” Robinson said.

Joanna Chapman said she hopes Caroline Thomson, a neighbour of 10 Newman, will be invited by the city, or other EcoPark partners, to participate in rehabilitation.

“My main concern would be to ensure that the site can once again be used safely by wildlife,” Chapman said.

She also hopes city building and planning departments will be more careful when they issue permits — in Pleasant View and city-wide.

Tomasz Wiercioch, Cootes to Escarpment EcoPark system co-ordinator at the Royal Botanical Gardens, said he’s not aware of any partners — including the RBG, Halton and Hamilton conservation authorities, Hamilton Naturalists’ Club and McMaster University — discussing any potential involvement with the property’s rehabilitation.

The city has not yet closed the property purchase, so it may be waiting to start rehabilitation planning and consult EcoPark partners.

Wiercioch said 10 Newman falls in the EcoPark’s Borer’s Falls-Rock Chapel Heritage Land — an area containing part of the largest area of undisturbed forest habitat within the EcoPark corridor.

It’s the centre of an area recognized for provincially and nationally significant plant and wildlife diversity.

“(The EcoPark) supports any possible addition to the natural green space in the Pleasant View Survey as it benefits local biodiversity and improves important wildlife corridor links between the Niagara Escarpment and Lake Ontario watershed,” Wiercioch said.

He said EcoPark partners have collaborated on naturalization of each other’s land, and intend to continue working together — but he’s not aware of any partners exploring opportunities for 10 Newman Rd., despite Hamilton City Council passing a motion to do so.

Wierioch said the City of Hamilton is an EcoPark partner.

Caroline Thomson hopes to play a role in the property’s rehabilitation.

“I’d like to see it filled with things that support wildlife,” she said. “This is a small corridor that happens to be integral.”

She said the property represents the EcoPark’s goals — creating and protecting a natural link from Cootes Paradise to the Niagara Escarpment.

“It needs to be protected forever,” Thomson said. “The best thing in my opinion that could happen to this land is that it be included in the EcoPark footprint and forever protected.”

Cootes Paradise is recognized as a National Historic Site, Nationally Important Bird Area, and an Important Amphibian Area. The Niagara Escarpment is a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve

Several layers of restrictive planning and development policy in Pleasant View were intended to protect and preserve the link between the two significant areas.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: We broke news of a 10 Newman Rd. settlement that includes the City of Hamilton buying the property and wanted to understand some of the early impacts.