Dundas historic artifacts await a future public home

News Aug 07, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

More than 5,580 18th and 19th century archeological artifacts excavated from a Dundas property have been stored in a Mississauga warehouse for at least seven months, awaiting completion of a proposed development.

The significant collection of historic items dating back to the 1700s, from a York Road site associated with the residence of Anne Morden — one of the valley’s earliest residents — could eventually be moved to a public institution, such as the Dundas Museum & Archives or McMaster University’s Sustainable Archaeology at the McMaster Innovation Park, after the proposed development of 56 York Rd. is completed.

The stage three consultant archeologist’s report states: “Given that there is a possibility the site represents the occupation of Ann Morden …. this site should be considered of significant value to the local history of the Town of Dundas. Furthermore, this site may represent a unique opportunity to investigate the cultural heritage of the post-Revolutionary War refugee diaspora.”

Claire Freisenhausen of CRM Lab Archaeological Services, which conducted the Phase 3 assessment between November 2018 and May 2019, said the artifacts are stored at CRM Lab as required by the terms and conditions of her licence with the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport.

“Rest assured, they are safe,” Freisenhausen said. “At this time, I am unable to divulge anything further regarding the project without the property owner’s consent given the current status.”

The proposal for a three-storey addition to an existing building to create eight apartment units needs site plan approval before getting a building permit.

Another 887 artifacts excavated from the property during a stage two assessment in August 2018 by Kitchener’s ARA Archaeology are apparently stored in an Ancaster warehouse. That brings the total number of artifacts excavated from the site to more than 6,470.

Denelle Balfour, spokesperson for Ontario’s Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport, which regulates archaeologists in the province, said the licensee must keep the artifact collection until the development project is complete and has identified a public institution willing to take the collection and maintain it for public access.

Kevin Puddister, curator and general manager of the Dundas Museum & Archives, said he was aware of the significant local archeological discovery and CRM staff used museum archives to research the property.

“This is an interesting site that I’d like to learn more about myself,” Puddister said. “The museum would be interested in showcasing the findings and some of the artifacts of the archeological survey in the future if that’s a possibility.”

Freisenhausen said CRM will follow up with the Dundas Museum.

According to a 188-page stage three site-specific archeological assessment of 56 York Rd., completed between November 2018 and May 2019, the property “indeed represents a high level of cultural heritage value or interest.”

The CRM report named 56 York the “Morden-Hare Site” after former occupants Anne Morden in the 1700s, William Hare beginning 1810 and James D. Hare beginning 1832.

It recommended an extensive stage four excavation before development of the site.

City of Hamilton planning spokesperson Allison Jones said the owner will “cap” the remaining archeological deposit and continue site plan review of a proposed addition to the existing building without further excavation.

“The developer, in conjunction with their consultant archeologist, decided to go for an avoidance and protection approach for the site rather than mitigation through excavation,” Jones said.

Scott Martin, operations manager of Sustainable Archaeology McMaster, said the public institution was established to curate artifact collections for researchers, descendent community members and interested members of the public.

He noted a professional licensee of the consultant company is required to hold the collection in safekeeping.

“That should mean that interested parties will be able to view the collection, but, in practice, storage at home or in a company’s warehouse often creates barriers to public access,” Martin said. “Sometimes these collections have ceased being cared for, for various reasons, and there have been instances where collections have been disposed of.”

He said Sustainable Archaeology McMaster was created to provide a way out of Ontario’s “collections crisis” and encourage research.

Martin said archaeologists are always producing required reports about their investigations, but most remain ‘grey literature’, rarely reaching the public.

“Sometimes, consultant archaeologists will present findings at symposia or local Ontario Archaeology Society chapter or other heritage society meetings and sometimes they will publish findings, but it is often challenging for the public to track down and see the results,” Martin said. “On the whole, archaeologists are quite keen to share their results with the community and the licensee from (CRM Lab) may have some ideas or plans for this.”

Martin said the plan to construct the addition on a platform over the property in order to avoid impact to the site is “an interesting and sophisticated solution.”

He said although Indigenous artifacts found did not meet quantity, or type, requirements to warrant further investigation under provincial guidelines, some of those finds were significant. He said the report identified evidence of Indigenous stone tools not typical in local sites.

“While we draw attention to the settler archeology of Dundas, we should also celebrate the Indigenous past.”

 

Dundas historic artifacts await a future public home

Archaeologists call Morden-Hare find 'significant' to local history

News Aug 07, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

More than 5,580 18th and 19th century archeological artifacts excavated from a Dundas property have been stored in a Mississauga warehouse for at least seven months, awaiting completion of a proposed development.

The significant collection of historic items dating back to the 1700s, from a York Road site associated with the residence of Anne Morden — one of the valley’s earliest residents — could eventually be moved to a public institution, such as the Dundas Museum & Archives or McMaster University’s Sustainable Archaeology at the McMaster Innovation Park, after the proposed development of 56 York Rd. is completed.

The stage three consultant archeologist’s report states: “Given that there is a possibility the site represents the occupation of Ann Morden …. this site should be considered of significant value to the local history of the Town of Dundas. Furthermore, this site may represent a unique opportunity to investigate the cultural heritage of the post-Revolutionary War refugee diaspora.”

Claire Freisenhausen of CRM Lab Archaeological Services, which conducted the Phase 3 assessment between November 2018 and May 2019, said the artifacts are stored at CRM Lab as required by the terms and conditions of her licence with the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport.

Related Content

“Rest assured, they are safe,” Freisenhausen said. “At this time, I am unable to divulge anything further regarding the project without the property owner’s consent given the current status.”

The proposal for a three-storey addition to an existing building to create eight apartment units needs site plan approval before getting a building permit.

Another 887 artifacts excavated from the property during a stage two assessment in August 2018 by Kitchener’s ARA Archaeology are apparently stored in an Ancaster warehouse. That brings the total number of artifacts excavated from the site to more than 6,470.

Denelle Balfour, spokesperson for Ontario’s Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport, which regulates archaeologists in the province, said the licensee must keep the artifact collection until the development project is complete and has identified a public institution willing to take the collection and maintain it for public access.

Kevin Puddister, curator and general manager of the Dundas Museum & Archives, said he was aware of the significant local archeological discovery and CRM staff used museum archives to research the property.

“This is an interesting site that I’d like to learn more about myself,” Puddister said. “The museum would be interested in showcasing the findings and some of the artifacts of the archeological survey in the future if that’s a possibility.”

Freisenhausen said CRM will follow up with the Dundas Museum.

According to a 188-page stage three site-specific archeological assessment of 56 York Rd., completed between November 2018 and May 2019, the property “indeed represents a high level of cultural heritage value or interest.”

The CRM report named 56 York the “Morden-Hare Site” after former occupants Anne Morden in the 1700s, William Hare beginning 1810 and James D. Hare beginning 1832.

It recommended an extensive stage four excavation before development of the site.

City of Hamilton planning spokesperson Allison Jones said the owner will “cap” the remaining archeological deposit and continue site plan review of a proposed addition to the existing building without further excavation.

“The developer, in conjunction with their consultant archeologist, decided to go for an avoidance and protection approach for the site rather than mitigation through excavation,” Jones said.

Scott Martin, operations manager of Sustainable Archaeology McMaster, said the public institution was established to curate artifact collections for researchers, descendent community members and interested members of the public.

He noted a professional licensee of the consultant company is required to hold the collection in safekeeping.

“That should mean that interested parties will be able to view the collection, but, in practice, storage at home or in a company’s warehouse often creates barriers to public access,” Martin said. “Sometimes these collections have ceased being cared for, for various reasons, and there have been instances where collections have been disposed of.”

He said Sustainable Archaeology McMaster was created to provide a way out of Ontario’s “collections crisis” and encourage research.

Martin said archaeologists are always producing required reports about their investigations, but most remain ‘grey literature’, rarely reaching the public.

“Sometimes, consultant archaeologists will present findings at symposia or local Ontario Archaeology Society chapter or other heritage society meetings and sometimes they will publish findings, but it is often challenging for the public to track down and see the results,” Martin said. “On the whole, archaeologists are quite keen to share their results with the community and the licensee from (CRM Lab) may have some ideas or plans for this.”

Martin said the plan to construct the addition on a platform over the property in order to avoid impact to the site is “an interesting and sophisticated solution.”

He said although Indigenous artifacts found did not meet quantity, or type, requirements to warrant further investigation under provincial guidelines, some of those finds were significant. He said the report identified evidence of Indigenous stone tools not typical in local sites.

“While we draw attention to the settler archeology of Dundas, we should also celebrate the Indigenous past.”

 

Dundas historic artifacts await a future public home

Archaeologists call Morden-Hare find 'significant' to local history

News Aug 07, 2020 by Craig Campbell Dundas Star News

More than 5,580 18th and 19th century archeological artifacts excavated from a Dundas property have been stored in a Mississauga warehouse for at least seven months, awaiting completion of a proposed development.

The significant collection of historic items dating back to the 1700s, from a York Road site associated with the residence of Anne Morden — one of the valley’s earliest residents — could eventually be moved to a public institution, such as the Dundas Museum & Archives or McMaster University’s Sustainable Archaeology at the McMaster Innovation Park, after the proposed development of 56 York Rd. is completed.

The stage three consultant archeologist’s report states: “Given that there is a possibility the site represents the occupation of Ann Morden …. this site should be considered of significant value to the local history of the Town of Dundas. Furthermore, this site may represent a unique opportunity to investigate the cultural heritage of the post-Revolutionary War refugee diaspora.”

Claire Freisenhausen of CRM Lab Archaeological Services, which conducted the Phase 3 assessment between November 2018 and May 2019, said the artifacts are stored at CRM Lab as required by the terms and conditions of her licence with the Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport.

Related Content

“Rest assured, they are safe,” Freisenhausen said. “At this time, I am unable to divulge anything further regarding the project without the property owner’s consent given the current status.”

The proposal for a three-storey addition to an existing building to create eight apartment units needs site plan approval before getting a building permit.

Another 887 artifacts excavated from the property during a stage two assessment in August 2018 by Kitchener’s ARA Archaeology are apparently stored in an Ancaster warehouse. That brings the total number of artifacts excavated from the site to more than 6,470.

Denelle Balfour, spokesperson for Ontario’s Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport, which regulates archaeologists in the province, said the licensee must keep the artifact collection until the development project is complete and has identified a public institution willing to take the collection and maintain it for public access.

Kevin Puddister, curator and general manager of the Dundas Museum & Archives, said he was aware of the significant local archeological discovery and CRM staff used museum archives to research the property.

“This is an interesting site that I’d like to learn more about myself,” Puddister said. “The museum would be interested in showcasing the findings and some of the artifacts of the archeological survey in the future if that’s a possibility.”

Freisenhausen said CRM will follow up with the Dundas Museum.

According to a 188-page stage three site-specific archeological assessment of 56 York Rd., completed between November 2018 and May 2019, the property “indeed represents a high level of cultural heritage value or interest.”

The CRM report named 56 York the “Morden-Hare Site” after former occupants Anne Morden in the 1700s, William Hare beginning 1810 and James D. Hare beginning 1832.

It recommended an extensive stage four excavation before development of the site.

City of Hamilton planning spokesperson Allison Jones said the owner will “cap” the remaining archeological deposit and continue site plan review of a proposed addition to the existing building without further excavation.

“The developer, in conjunction with their consultant archeologist, decided to go for an avoidance and protection approach for the site rather than mitigation through excavation,” Jones said.

Scott Martin, operations manager of Sustainable Archaeology McMaster, said the public institution was established to curate artifact collections for researchers, descendent community members and interested members of the public.

He noted a professional licensee of the consultant company is required to hold the collection in safekeeping.

“That should mean that interested parties will be able to view the collection, but, in practice, storage at home or in a company’s warehouse often creates barriers to public access,” Martin said. “Sometimes these collections have ceased being cared for, for various reasons, and there have been instances where collections have been disposed of.”

He said Sustainable Archaeology McMaster was created to provide a way out of Ontario’s “collections crisis” and encourage research.

Martin said archaeologists are always producing required reports about their investigations, but most remain ‘grey literature’, rarely reaching the public.

“Sometimes, consultant archaeologists will present findings at symposia or local Ontario Archaeology Society chapter or other heritage society meetings and sometimes they will publish findings, but it is often challenging for the public to track down and see the results,” Martin said. “On the whole, archaeologists are quite keen to share their results with the community and the licensee from (CRM Lab) may have some ideas or plans for this.”

Martin said the plan to construct the addition on a platform over the property in order to avoid impact to the site is “an interesting and sophisticated solution.”

He said although Indigenous artifacts found did not meet quantity, or type, requirements to warrant further investigation under provincial guidelines, some of those finds were significant. He said the report identified evidence of Indigenous stone tools not typical in local sites.

“While we draw attention to the settler archeology of Dundas, we should also celebrate the Indigenous past.”