Stoney Creek restaurants adapt to Stage 3 reopening guidelines

News Jul 24, 2020 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

Restaurateurs in the Stoney Creek area are taking a slow and steady approach as they welcome guests back to the dining room during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Stage 3 reopening protocols — which took effect July 24 — allow for indoor dining with reduced capacity to maintain physical distancing.

At the Village Restaurant, co-proprietor Jerry Clifford expects to move cautiously while welcoming patrons back inside.

“We will do it in baby steps, like everyone else,” he said.

The Village, at the corner of King Street and Mountain Avenue South, normally holds up to 140 guests, but inside capacity will be limited to 50 during the Stage 3 reopening.

The family business has installed glass partitions to separate tables. Over the last few weeks the Village has offered patio service as well as curbside pickup.

Servers are wearing masks and patrons will be required to don masks when entering the establishment. Masks can be removed when customers are seated at the table to eat, but face coverings should be worn when patrons leave their table, for example, to use the restroom. Staff will record customer names for contact tracing purposes. The restaurant can supply a mask for those who don’t have one.

While the dining room can now reopen with reduced capacity, Clifford expects patrons will continue using the patio during the warm summer weather.

“Right now, people enjoy being outside,” he said. “The patio’s been working out great.”

Overall, said Clifford, customers have continued to support the restaurant despite the restrictions.

“I give people a lot of credit,” said Clifford. “We’ve been fortunate that people are really understanding.”

At Banana Leaf Asian Cuisine in the Elm-King Plaza, co-owner Tom Ngo doesn’t expect to reopen for indoor dining until mid-August. Until then, the restaurant is offering pickup service.

“I don’t know if we will be able to (reopen) on such short notice,” Ngo said on July 22. “We still have to observe the precautions.”

While the restaurant normally seats 40 patrons, Ngo expects that number will likely have to be capped at 20 once the dining room reopens under Stage 3 guidelines.

The restaurant is using the down time to complete some renovations, including an upgraded air conditioning system.

Members of the Sauvé family, who operate six Tim Hortons franchises in east Hamilton, were eager to begin welcoming customers once again on July 24.

On July 23, Maureen Sauvé said her restaurants have been prepped with reduced seating to maintain the minimum two-metre physical distancing.

“Of course, it’ll be limited seating, but it’s an exciting moment,” Sauvé said of the dining room reopening.

Sauvé expects her restaurants will have no more than one third of their normal seating capacity. For example, in a row of three booths with 12 seats, only four will be used.

Dr. Zain Chagla, an infectious disease physician at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, warns patrons to be careful if they’re planning to visit a bar during the Stage 3 reopening.

“While allowed to be used, bars are not necessarily the safest as there has been transmission in these settings globally and in Canada,” he said. “If you have personal risks and vulnerabilities, you may need to be cautious.”

Chagla urges bar patrons to:

• Moderate alcohol intake

• Stay at your table

• Limit your stay

• Understand the risks. You might be exposed to COVID-19 or notified as a contact in tracing and made to isolate.

While restaurants, gyms and playgrounds are allowed to reopen, the province’s Chief Medical Officer of Health has advised that several “high-risk” places and activities are not yet safe, due to the likelihood of large crowds congregating, difficulties with physical distancing, or challenges maintaining the proper cleaning and sanitation required to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Activities not yet authorized to open include:

• Amusement parks and water parks

• Buffet-style food services

• Dancing at restaurants and bars, other than by performers hired by the establishment following specific requirements

• Overnight stays at camps for children

• Private karaoke rooms

• Prolonged or deliberate contact while playing sports

• Saunas, steam rooms, bath houses and oxygen bars

• Table games at casinos and gaming establishments.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: We wanted to find out what in-person restaurant dining will look like during Stage 3 reopening of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Stoney Creek restaurants adapt to Stage 3 reopening guidelines

Limited indoor seating allows for physical distancing

News Jul 24, 2020 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

Restaurateurs in the Stoney Creek area are taking a slow and steady approach as they welcome guests back to the dining room during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Stage 3 reopening protocols — which took effect July 24 — allow for indoor dining with reduced capacity to maintain physical distancing.

At the Village Restaurant, co-proprietor Jerry Clifford expects to move cautiously while welcoming patrons back inside.

“We will do it in baby steps, like everyone else,” he said.

Related Content

The Village, at the corner of King Street and Mountain Avenue South, normally holds up to 140 guests, but inside capacity will be limited to 50 during the Stage 3 reopening.

The family business has installed glass partitions to separate tables. Over the last few weeks the Village has offered patio service as well as curbside pickup.

Servers are wearing masks and patrons will be required to don masks when entering the establishment. Masks can be removed when customers are seated at the table to eat, but face coverings should be worn when patrons leave their table, for example, to use the restroom. Staff will record customer names for contact tracing purposes. The restaurant can supply a mask for those who don’t have one.

While the dining room can now reopen with reduced capacity, Clifford expects patrons will continue using the patio during the warm summer weather.

“Right now, people enjoy being outside,” he said. “The patio’s been working out great.”

Overall, said Clifford, customers have continued to support the restaurant despite the restrictions.

“I give people a lot of credit,” said Clifford. “We’ve been fortunate that people are really understanding.”

At Banana Leaf Asian Cuisine in the Elm-King Plaza, co-owner Tom Ngo doesn’t expect to reopen for indoor dining until mid-August. Until then, the restaurant is offering pickup service.

“I don’t know if we will be able to (reopen) on such short notice,” Ngo said on July 22. “We still have to observe the precautions.”

While the restaurant normally seats 40 patrons, Ngo expects that number will likely have to be capped at 20 once the dining room reopens under Stage 3 guidelines.

The restaurant is using the down time to complete some renovations, including an upgraded air conditioning system.

Members of the Sauvé family, who operate six Tim Hortons franchises in east Hamilton, were eager to begin welcoming customers once again on July 24.

On July 23, Maureen Sauvé said her restaurants have been prepped with reduced seating to maintain the minimum two-metre physical distancing.

“Of course, it’ll be limited seating, but it’s an exciting moment,” Sauvé said of the dining room reopening.

Sauvé expects her restaurants will have no more than one third of their normal seating capacity. For example, in a row of three booths with 12 seats, only four will be used.

Dr. Zain Chagla, an infectious disease physician at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, warns patrons to be careful if they’re planning to visit a bar during the Stage 3 reopening.

“While allowed to be used, bars are not necessarily the safest as there has been transmission in these settings globally and in Canada,” he said. “If you have personal risks and vulnerabilities, you may need to be cautious.”

Chagla urges bar patrons to:

• Moderate alcohol intake

• Stay at your table

• Limit your stay

• Understand the risks. You might be exposed to COVID-19 or notified as a contact in tracing and made to isolate.

While restaurants, gyms and playgrounds are allowed to reopen, the province’s Chief Medical Officer of Health has advised that several “high-risk” places and activities are not yet safe, due to the likelihood of large crowds congregating, difficulties with physical distancing, or challenges maintaining the proper cleaning and sanitation required to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Activities not yet authorized to open include:

• Amusement parks and water parks

• Buffet-style food services

• Dancing at restaurants and bars, other than by performers hired by the establishment following specific requirements

• Overnight stays at camps for children

• Private karaoke rooms

• Prolonged or deliberate contact while playing sports

• Saunas, steam rooms, bath houses and oxygen bars

• Table games at casinos and gaming establishments.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: We wanted to find out what in-person restaurant dining will look like during Stage 3 reopening of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Stoney Creek restaurants adapt to Stage 3 reopening guidelines

Limited indoor seating allows for physical distancing

News Jul 24, 2020 by Mike Pearson Stoney Creek News

Restaurateurs in the Stoney Creek area are taking a slow and steady approach as they welcome guests back to the dining room during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Stage 3 reopening protocols — which took effect July 24 — allow for indoor dining with reduced capacity to maintain physical distancing.

At the Village Restaurant, co-proprietor Jerry Clifford expects to move cautiously while welcoming patrons back inside.

“We will do it in baby steps, like everyone else,” he said.

Related Content

The Village, at the corner of King Street and Mountain Avenue South, normally holds up to 140 guests, but inside capacity will be limited to 50 during the Stage 3 reopening.

The family business has installed glass partitions to separate tables. Over the last few weeks the Village has offered patio service as well as curbside pickup.

Servers are wearing masks and patrons will be required to don masks when entering the establishment. Masks can be removed when customers are seated at the table to eat, but face coverings should be worn when patrons leave their table, for example, to use the restroom. Staff will record customer names for contact tracing purposes. The restaurant can supply a mask for those who don’t have one.

While the dining room can now reopen with reduced capacity, Clifford expects patrons will continue using the patio during the warm summer weather.

“Right now, people enjoy being outside,” he said. “The patio’s been working out great.”

Overall, said Clifford, customers have continued to support the restaurant despite the restrictions.

“I give people a lot of credit,” said Clifford. “We’ve been fortunate that people are really understanding.”

At Banana Leaf Asian Cuisine in the Elm-King Plaza, co-owner Tom Ngo doesn’t expect to reopen for indoor dining until mid-August. Until then, the restaurant is offering pickup service.

“I don’t know if we will be able to (reopen) on such short notice,” Ngo said on July 22. “We still have to observe the precautions.”

While the restaurant normally seats 40 patrons, Ngo expects that number will likely have to be capped at 20 once the dining room reopens under Stage 3 guidelines.

The restaurant is using the down time to complete some renovations, including an upgraded air conditioning system.

Members of the Sauvé family, who operate six Tim Hortons franchises in east Hamilton, were eager to begin welcoming customers once again on July 24.

On July 23, Maureen Sauvé said her restaurants have been prepped with reduced seating to maintain the minimum two-metre physical distancing.

“Of course, it’ll be limited seating, but it’s an exciting moment,” Sauvé said of the dining room reopening.

Sauvé expects her restaurants will have no more than one third of their normal seating capacity. For example, in a row of three booths with 12 seats, only four will be used.

Dr. Zain Chagla, an infectious disease physician at St. Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton, warns patrons to be careful if they’re planning to visit a bar during the Stage 3 reopening.

“While allowed to be used, bars are not necessarily the safest as there has been transmission in these settings globally and in Canada,” he said. “If you have personal risks and vulnerabilities, you may need to be cautious.”

Chagla urges bar patrons to:

• Moderate alcohol intake

• Stay at your table

• Limit your stay

• Understand the risks. You might be exposed to COVID-19 or notified as a contact in tracing and made to isolate.

While restaurants, gyms and playgrounds are allowed to reopen, the province’s Chief Medical Officer of Health has advised that several “high-risk” places and activities are not yet safe, due to the likelihood of large crowds congregating, difficulties with physical distancing, or challenges maintaining the proper cleaning and sanitation required to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Activities not yet authorized to open include:

• Amusement parks and water parks

• Buffet-style food services

• Dancing at restaurants and bars, other than by performers hired by the establishment following specific requirements

• Overnight stays at camps for children

• Private karaoke rooms

• Prolonged or deliberate contact while playing sports

• Saunas, steam rooms, bath houses and oxygen bars

• Table games at casinos and gaming establishments.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: We wanted to find out what in-person restaurant dining will look like during Stage 3 reopening of the COVID-19 pandemic.