COVID-19: Masks become mandatory in Hamilton on Monday

News Jul 17, 2020 by Teviah Moro Hamilton Spectator

City council has given final approval to a new bylaw that makes it mandatory to wear masks in public indoor spaces to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

The bylaw comes into force July 20 and applies to commercial areas, retail spaces, places of worship, community services and public transit.

Children under two, people with underlying health conditions that prevent them from wearing face-coverings and those who can’t don them without help are exempt.

The measure is crucial in the city’s efforts to prevent another resurgence of the virus and second economic shutdown, Mayor Fred Eisenberger said during Friday’s council meeting.

Hamilton has done “extremely well” but that’s because the “vast majority” of residents have followed public health guidelines.

Eisenberger said he’s “confident” the mask bylaw will help avoid a spike in cases as the economy reopens. “And hopefully not another person dies as a result of COVID. That’s really the bottom line.”

The majority vote to ratify the bylaw comes after councillors gave an initial nod of approval at board of health last week. Public health will review it in three months.

On Friday, Coun. Judi Partridge argued the bylaw leans too heavily on small-business operators who face potential volatility from customers who refuse to wear masks.

“This really does pit businesses against their customers,” said Judi Partridge, who along with Coun. Lloyd Ferguson, voted against the bylaw.

Coun. Terry Whitehead objected to aspects of the new regulations but supported masks in general.

Coun. Sam Merulla dismissed letters that questioned whether masks helped prevent the spread of coronavirus and advanced conspiracy theories.

“You’re either part of the solution or part of the problem,” he said calling anti-maskers selfish and “grossly insulting.”

Business operators who don’t follow the regulations, including posting signs at the entrance of their establishment about the bylaw, face $500 fines. People who don’t follow the rules could be issued $200 tickets.

But the focus won’t be on the “heavy hand of enforcement,” said Ken Leendertse, who leads the city’s bylaw and licensing department. “It’s all about education.”

COVID-19: Masks become mandatory in Hamilton on Monday

Mayor ‘confident’ it will help prevent a second wave of coronavirus

News Jul 17, 2020 by Teviah Moro Hamilton Spectator

City council has given final approval to a new bylaw that makes it mandatory to wear masks in public indoor spaces to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

The bylaw comes into force July 20 and applies to commercial areas, retail spaces, places of worship, community services and public transit.

Children under two, people with underlying health conditions that prevent them from wearing face-coverings and those who can’t don them without help are exempt.

The measure is crucial in the city’s efforts to prevent another resurgence of the virus and second economic shutdown, Mayor Fred Eisenberger said during Friday’s council meeting.

Related Content

Hamilton has done “extremely well” but that’s because the “vast majority” of residents have followed public health guidelines.

Eisenberger said he’s “confident” the mask bylaw will help avoid a spike in cases as the economy reopens. “And hopefully not another person dies as a result of COVID. That’s really the bottom line.”

The majority vote to ratify the bylaw comes after councillors gave an initial nod of approval at board of health last week. Public health will review it in three months.

On Friday, Coun. Judi Partridge argued the bylaw leans too heavily on small-business operators who face potential volatility from customers who refuse to wear masks.

“This really does pit businesses against their customers,” said Judi Partridge, who along with Coun. Lloyd Ferguson, voted against the bylaw.

Coun. Terry Whitehead objected to aspects of the new regulations but supported masks in general.

Coun. Sam Merulla dismissed letters that questioned whether masks helped prevent the spread of coronavirus and advanced conspiracy theories.

“You’re either part of the solution or part of the problem,” he said calling anti-maskers selfish and “grossly insulting.”

Business operators who don’t follow the regulations, including posting signs at the entrance of their establishment about the bylaw, face $500 fines. People who don’t follow the rules could be issued $200 tickets.

But the focus won’t be on the “heavy hand of enforcement,” said Ken Leendertse, who leads the city’s bylaw and licensing department. “It’s all about education.”

COVID-19: Masks become mandatory in Hamilton on Monday

Mayor ‘confident’ it will help prevent a second wave of coronavirus

News Jul 17, 2020 by Teviah Moro Hamilton Spectator

City council has given final approval to a new bylaw that makes it mandatory to wear masks in public indoor spaces to help prevent the spread of COVID-19.

The bylaw comes into force July 20 and applies to commercial areas, retail spaces, places of worship, community services and public transit.

Children under two, people with underlying health conditions that prevent them from wearing face-coverings and those who can’t don them without help are exempt.

The measure is crucial in the city’s efforts to prevent another resurgence of the virus and second economic shutdown, Mayor Fred Eisenberger said during Friday’s council meeting.

Related Content

Hamilton has done “extremely well” but that’s because the “vast majority” of residents have followed public health guidelines.

Eisenberger said he’s “confident” the mask bylaw will help avoid a spike in cases as the economy reopens. “And hopefully not another person dies as a result of COVID. That’s really the bottom line.”

The majority vote to ratify the bylaw comes after councillors gave an initial nod of approval at board of health last week. Public health will review it in three months.

On Friday, Coun. Judi Partridge argued the bylaw leans too heavily on small-business operators who face potential volatility from customers who refuse to wear masks.

“This really does pit businesses against their customers,” said Judi Partridge, who along with Coun. Lloyd Ferguson, voted against the bylaw.

Coun. Terry Whitehead objected to aspects of the new regulations but supported masks in general.

Coun. Sam Merulla dismissed letters that questioned whether masks helped prevent the spread of coronavirus and advanced conspiracy theories.

“You’re either part of the solution or part of the problem,” he said calling anti-maskers selfish and “grossly insulting.”

Business operators who don’t follow the regulations, including posting signs at the entrance of their establishment about the bylaw, face $500 fines. People who don’t follow the rules could be issued $200 tickets.

But the focus won’t be on the “heavy hand of enforcement,” said Ken Leendertse, who leads the city’s bylaw and licensing department. “It’s all about education.”