Hamilton to designate 31 Ancaster properties

News Jul 06, 2020 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

40 properties along Ancaster's Wilson Street East, which were set to be placed on Hamilton’s registry of properties of cultural value, have been reduced by about 10 after it was determined that some of the structures had already been demolished.

In April, councillors approved a motion, introduced by Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson, to add 40 properties within the Wilson Street Secondary Plan to the city’s registry of properties of cultural heritage value. The revised number of properties that were added to the list by the heritage committee at its July 3 meeting is now 31.

Ferguson introduced the motion in an effort to protect the community’s remaining historic structures in the aftermath of the March demolition of the Brandon House. The owner submitted a demolition permit to the city, which had been approved by planning and cultural staff. The structure was not designated a heritage property.

“Wilson Street is under siege,” said Ferguson in an interview.

He said there are five development applications that include highrise condominium units, where the owners want to break the former town’s height requirements and impact Ancaster’s downtown.

After a further review of the 40 properties by cultural staff, it was determined that 10 properties along the town’s main corridor had already been demolished, with a few of the lands already developed.

For instance, 469 Wilson Street East, near Rousseaux Street, was redeveloped in 1988, while 370 Wilson Street East is now a plaza that includes a Tim Hortons; 323 Wilson Street East was redeveloped in 1983 and 326 Wilson Street East was redeveloped in 1985 for health-care use.

The other five properties – 412, 406, 400, 335 and 213 Wilson Street East – have all been demolished, while 213 Wilson Street East is now a vacant lot.

Steve Robichaud, director of planning, said the original 40 properties that were selected came from the Wilson Street Secondary Plan, as well as from the Ancaster Historical Society.

The properties on the registry list will be added to cultural staff’s work plan to be designated and “provide land use planning protection through the zoning bylaw and official planning policy. This is sort of a legacy situation.”

The heritage committee added one property outside Ancaster’s core – 558 Wilson Street East. The owner, Anne Newbigging, said her house was constructed in 1853 for a miller who worked at the town’s former mill.

“I ask that my house be included,” stated Newbigging.

Meanwhile, Fred Dalley wanted the committee to review why his house – 449 Wilson Street East, located across the street from the former Brandon House – was included in the list.

He said that even though his family has owned the property for more than 100 years, the original structure that was located on the property, called the Gable House, was destroyed in a fire in 1950.

Dalley said his father rebuilt the house.

“Our house may look heritage, but it isn’t,” said Dalley.

Neil Smiley, a lawyer representing the Roman Catholic Episcopal Corporation for the Diocese of Hamilton in Ontario, also requested additional time for the diocese to examine the implications for placing 437 Wilson Street East, the Mount Mary Retreat Centre, on the list

He told the committee the diocese wanted to make sure that the property should be on the list, “but also it is no way prejudicial. Not asking you to remove (it) from the list, not asking you to defer your listing of other properties, just to defer the consideration of the Diocese’s property until they have an opportunity to review the report or speak to staff."

Both the properties at 437 and 449 Wilson Street East were kept on the list by the heritage committee, with the stipulation that planning staff discuss with the property owners the implications of being placed on the heritage list.

Heritage chair Alyssa Denham-Robinsons said Ferguson’s motion was in reaction to residents’ concerns about the loss of heritage buildings over the years.

“The community was frustrated,” she said. “It is our responsibility to look at this list respectively (and) allow those two property owners to follow up with staff.”

Once the properties are on the inventory list of heritage buildings, the next step would be for those buildings to be designated as heritage structures, which would protect them from being demolished. However, city staff said the list of applications to have buildings designated will take until at least 2035 to be completed. 

A few of the other buildings that will be designated include 442 Wilson Street East, which is now the Village Gate Montessori School; a white clapboard building at 450 Wilson Street East; 280 Wilson Street East; 335 Wilson Street East, that houses the legal office of Shobita Ravindran; 420 Wilson Street East, an 1820 building that housed various merchants over the years and is now home to the Needle Emporium; and 406 Wilson Street East, recognized as the Alonzo Egleston House that was built around 1846.

“(The heritage designation) allows a stay of execution, if you will, on any demolition permit,” said Ferguson.

If a property is added to the heritage register, it would mean that once a demolition permit is issued, there is a 60-day window where council can decide whether or not the demolition application can proceed, said planning general manager Jason Thorne.

If a property is designated a heritage structure, a demolition permit request is null and void and the owner of the property would need to seek council approval for any alterations or demolition.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: Following the surprise demolition of the historic Brandon House earlier this year, we have been following efforts to preserve the remaining heritage buildings within Ancaster's village core.

Hamilton's heritage committee places 31 Ancaster properties on cultural list

List updated to reflect sites already demolished

News Jul 06, 2020 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

40 properties along Ancaster's Wilson Street East, which were set to be placed on Hamilton’s registry of properties of cultural value, have been reduced by about 10 after it was determined that some of the structures had already been demolished.

In April, councillors approved a motion, introduced by Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson, to add 40 properties within the Wilson Street Secondary Plan to the city’s registry of properties of cultural heritage value. The revised number of properties that were added to the list by the heritage committee at its July 3 meeting is now 31.

Ferguson introduced the motion in an effort to protect the community’s remaining historic structures in the aftermath of the March demolition of the Brandon House. The owner submitted a demolition permit to the city, which had been approved by planning and cultural staff. The structure was not designated a heritage property.

“Wilson Street is under siege,” said Ferguson in an interview.

He said there are five development applications that include highrise condominium units, where the owners want to break the former town’s height requirements and impact Ancaster’s downtown.

After a further review of the 40 properties by cultural staff, it was determined that 10 properties along the town’s main corridor had already been demolished, with a few of the lands already developed.

For instance, 469 Wilson Street East, near Rousseaux Street, was redeveloped in 1988, while 370 Wilson Street East is now a plaza that includes a Tim Hortons; 323 Wilson Street East was redeveloped in 1983 and 326 Wilson Street East was redeveloped in 1985 for health-care use.

The other five properties – 412, 406, 400, 335 and 213 Wilson Street East – have all been demolished, while 213 Wilson Street East is now a vacant lot.

Steve Robichaud, director of planning, said the original 40 properties that were selected came from the Wilson Street Secondary Plan, as well as from the Ancaster Historical Society.

The properties on the registry list will be added to cultural staff’s work plan to be designated and “provide land use planning protection through the zoning bylaw and official planning policy. This is sort of a legacy situation.”

The heritage committee added one property outside Ancaster’s core – 558 Wilson Street East. The owner, Anne Newbigging, said her house was constructed in 1853 for a miller who worked at the town’s former mill.

“I ask that my house be included,” stated Newbigging.

Meanwhile, Fred Dalley wanted the committee to review why his house – 449 Wilson Street East, located across the street from the former Brandon House – was included in the list.

He said that even though his family has owned the property for more than 100 years, the original structure that was located on the property, called the Gable House, was destroyed in a fire in 1950.

Dalley said his father rebuilt the house.

“Our house may look heritage, but it isn’t,” said Dalley.

Neil Smiley, a lawyer representing the Roman Catholic Episcopal Corporation for the Diocese of Hamilton in Ontario, also requested additional time for the diocese to examine the implications for placing 437 Wilson Street East, the Mount Mary Retreat Centre, on the list

He told the committee the diocese wanted to make sure that the property should be on the list, “but also it is no way prejudicial. Not asking you to remove (it) from the list, not asking you to defer your listing of other properties, just to defer the consideration of the Diocese’s property until they have an opportunity to review the report or speak to staff."

Both the properties at 437 and 449 Wilson Street East were kept on the list by the heritage committee, with the stipulation that planning staff discuss with the property owners the implications of being placed on the heritage list.

Heritage chair Alyssa Denham-Robinsons said Ferguson’s motion was in reaction to residents’ concerns about the loss of heritage buildings over the years.

“The community was frustrated,” she said. “It is our responsibility to look at this list respectively (and) allow those two property owners to follow up with staff.”

Once the properties are on the inventory list of heritage buildings, the next step would be for those buildings to be designated as heritage structures, which would protect them from being demolished. However, city staff said the list of applications to have buildings designated will take until at least 2035 to be completed. 

A few of the other buildings that will be designated include 442 Wilson Street East, which is now the Village Gate Montessori School; a white clapboard building at 450 Wilson Street East; 280 Wilson Street East; 335 Wilson Street East, that houses the legal office of Shobita Ravindran; 420 Wilson Street East, an 1820 building that housed various merchants over the years and is now home to the Needle Emporium; and 406 Wilson Street East, recognized as the Alonzo Egleston House that was built around 1846.

“(The heritage designation) allows a stay of execution, if you will, on any demolition permit,” said Ferguson.

If a property is added to the heritage register, it would mean that once a demolition permit is issued, there is a 60-day window where council can decide whether or not the demolition application can proceed, said planning general manager Jason Thorne.

If a property is designated a heritage structure, a demolition permit request is null and void and the owner of the property would need to seek council approval for any alterations or demolition.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: Following the surprise demolition of the historic Brandon House earlier this year, we have been following efforts to preserve the remaining heritage buildings within Ancaster's village core.

Hamilton's heritage committee places 31 Ancaster properties on cultural list

List updated to reflect sites already demolished

News Jul 06, 2020 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

40 properties along Ancaster's Wilson Street East, which were set to be placed on Hamilton’s registry of properties of cultural value, have been reduced by about 10 after it was determined that some of the structures had already been demolished.

In April, councillors approved a motion, introduced by Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson, to add 40 properties within the Wilson Street Secondary Plan to the city’s registry of properties of cultural heritage value. The revised number of properties that were added to the list by the heritage committee at its July 3 meeting is now 31.

Ferguson introduced the motion in an effort to protect the community’s remaining historic structures in the aftermath of the March demolition of the Brandon House. The owner submitted a demolition permit to the city, which had been approved by planning and cultural staff. The structure was not designated a heritage property.

“Wilson Street is under siege,” said Ferguson in an interview.

He said there are five development applications that include highrise condominium units, where the owners want to break the former town’s height requirements and impact Ancaster’s downtown.

After a further review of the 40 properties by cultural staff, it was determined that 10 properties along the town’s main corridor had already been demolished, with a few of the lands already developed.

For instance, 469 Wilson Street East, near Rousseaux Street, was redeveloped in 1988, while 370 Wilson Street East is now a plaza that includes a Tim Hortons; 323 Wilson Street East was redeveloped in 1983 and 326 Wilson Street East was redeveloped in 1985 for health-care use.

The other five properties – 412, 406, 400, 335 and 213 Wilson Street East – have all been demolished, while 213 Wilson Street East is now a vacant lot.

Steve Robichaud, director of planning, said the original 40 properties that were selected came from the Wilson Street Secondary Plan, as well as from the Ancaster Historical Society.

The properties on the registry list will be added to cultural staff’s work plan to be designated and “provide land use planning protection through the zoning bylaw and official planning policy. This is sort of a legacy situation.”

The heritage committee added one property outside Ancaster’s core – 558 Wilson Street East. The owner, Anne Newbigging, said her house was constructed in 1853 for a miller who worked at the town’s former mill.

“I ask that my house be included,” stated Newbigging.

Meanwhile, Fred Dalley wanted the committee to review why his house – 449 Wilson Street East, located across the street from the former Brandon House – was included in the list.

He said that even though his family has owned the property for more than 100 years, the original structure that was located on the property, called the Gable House, was destroyed in a fire in 1950.

Dalley said his father rebuilt the house.

“Our house may look heritage, but it isn’t,” said Dalley.

Neil Smiley, a lawyer representing the Roman Catholic Episcopal Corporation for the Diocese of Hamilton in Ontario, also requested additional time for the diocese to examine the implications for placing 437 Wilson Street East, the Mount Mary Retreat Centre, on the list

He told the committee the diocese wanted to make sure that the property should be on the list, “but also it is no way prejudicial. Not asking you to remove (it) from the list, not asking you to defer your listing of other properties, just to defer the consideration of the Diocese’s property until they have an opportunity to review the report or speak to staff."

Both the properties at 437 and 449 Wilson Street East were kept on the list by the heritage committee, with the stipulation that planning staff discuss with the property owners the implications of being placed on the heritage list.

Heritage chair Alyssa Denham-Robinsons said Ferguson’s motion was in reaction to residents’ concerns about the loss of heritage buildings over the years.

“The community was frustrated,” she said. “It is our responsibility to look at this list respectively (and) allow those two property owners to follow up with staff.”

Once the properties are on the inventory list of heritage buildings, the next step would be for those buildings to be designated as heritage structures, which would protect them from being demolished. However, city staff said the list of applications to have buildings designated will take until at least 2035 to be completed. 

A few of the other buildings that will be designated include 442 Wilson Street East, which is now the Village Gate Montessori School; a white clapboard building at 450 Wilson Street East; 280 Wilson Street East; 335 Wilson Street East, that houses the legal office of Shobita Ravindran; 420 Wilson Street East, an 1820 building that housed various merchants over the years and is now home to the Needle Emporium; and 406 Wilson Street East, recognized as the Alonzo Egleston House that was built around 1846.

“(The heritage designation) allows a stay of execution, if you will, on any demolition permit,” said Ferguson.

If a property is added to the heritage register, it would mean that once a demolition permit is issued, there is a 60-day window where council can decide whether or not the demolition application can proceed, said planning general manager Jason Thorne.

If a property is designated a heritage structure, a demolition permit request is null and void and the owner of the property would need to seek council approval for any alterations or demolition.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: Following the surprise demolition of the historic Brandon House earlier this year, we have been following efforts to preserve the remaining heritage buildings within Ancaster's village core.