Hamilton approves revised physical distancing bylaw

News Jun 16, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton has updated its physical distancing bylaw that imposes a $500 fine for anyone who fails to maintain a distance of at least two metres from others.

Hamilton’s legal officials advised the city needed to update its physical distancing bylaw after the province recently revised its emergency orders allowing gatherings of 10 people or less rather than the previous limit of five people.

Hamilton’s general issues committee approved the revised bylaw at its June 15 meeting.

Councillors approved the bylaw in early April to send a message to residents who fail to follow the province’s emergency orders. City officials said at the time that people continued to gather at the city’s many waterfalls, the escarpment stairs, and they had been playing soccer or basketball in groups of more than five at city parks. Other municipalities created their own physical distancing bylaws, including Burlington and Toronto.

“All that is contrary to physical separation,” said Mayor Fred Eisenberger in April.

He called the bylaw an “unfortunate, but necessary circumstances” and that “we are going to be able to save lives” if residents follow these public health measures.

Eisenberger recently said the city wasn’t going to rescind the bylaw because the province and Hamilton was still under a state of emergency.

The bylaw imposed a set fine of $500 for infractions, including: failing to maintain a two-metre distance; property owners failing to provide physical distancing space; attending or using a city property that had been closed; and obstructing an officer or staff person.

Ken Leendertse, director of licensing, said city bylaw officers laid 170 charges under Ontario’s emergency orders, including having a business open when it should have been closed. Leendertse said the city had issued 26 tickets under the physical distancing bylaw.

A number of those tickets were issued to people who were gathering at the closed escarpment stairs, Albion Falls, and at a number of house parties where there was limited physical distancing.

“The last couple of weeks we haven’t laid any charges,” said Leendertse. “We seem to be seeing significant compliance in both the provincial and municipal bylaw.”

Leendertse told Ward 1 Coun. Maureen Wilson, who attended a Black Lives Matter rally at Hamilton City Hall June 12, that she could have been issued a fine if she was not physically distancing during the event. It was estimated hundreds of people stage protests at Gore Park and at Dundurn Park on June 13, which followed another large march through downtown Hamilton and ended up at city hall.

“If you were not physically distancing you could have been in violation of the bylaw,” said Leendertse.

Hamilton updates physical distancing bylaw

News Jun 16, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton has updated its physical distancing bylaw that imposes a $500 fine for anyone who fails to maintain a distance of at least two metres from others.

Hamilton’s legal officials advised the city needed to update its physical distancing bylaw after the province recently revised its emergency orders allowing gatherings of 10 people or less rather than the previous limit of five people.

Hamilton’s general issues committee approved the revised bylaw at its June 15 meeting.

Councillors approved the bylaw in early April to send a message to residents who fail to follow the province’s emergency orders. City officials said at the time that people continued to gather at the city’s many waterfalls, the escarpment stairs, and they had been playing soccer or basketball in groups of more than five at city parks. Other municipalities created their own physical distancing bylaws, including Burlington and Toronto.

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“All that is contrary to physical separation,” said Mayor Fred Eisenberger in April.

He called the bylaw an “unfortunate, but necessary circumstances” and that “we are going to be able to save lives” if residents follow these public health measures.

Eisenberger recently said the city wasn’t going to rescind the bylaw because the province and Hamilton was still under a state of emergency.

The bylaw imposed a set fine of $500 for infractions, including: failing to maintain a two-metre distance; property owners failing to provide physical distancing space; attending or using a city property that had been closed; and obstructing an officer or staff person.

Ken Leendertse, director of licensing, said city bylaw officers laid 170 charges under Ontario’s emergency orders, including having a business open when it should have been closed. Leendertse said the city had issued 26 tickets under the physical distancing bylaw.

A number of those tickets were issued to people who were gathering at the closed escarpment stairs, Albion Falls, and at a number of house parties where there was limited physical distancing.

“The last couple of weeks we haven’t laid any charges,” said Leendertse. “We seem to be seeing significant compliance in both the provincial and municipal bylaw.”

Leendertse told Ward 1 Coun. Maureen Wilson, who attended a Black Lives Matter rally at Hamilton City Hall June 12, that she could have been issued a fine if she was not physically distancing during the event. It was estimated hundreds of people stage protests at Gore Park and at Dundurn Park on June 13, which followed another large march through downtown Hamilton and ended up at city hall.

“If you were not physically distancing you could have been in violation of the bylaw,” said Leendertse.

Hamilton updates physical distancing bylaw

News Jun 16, 2020 by Kevin Werner Stoney Creek News

Hamilton has updated its physical distancing bylaw that imposes a $500 fine for anyone who fails to maintain a distance of at least two metres from others.

Hamilton’s legal officials advised the city needed to update its physical distancing bylaw after the province recently revised its emergency orders allowing gatherings of 10 people or less rather than the previous limit of five people.

Hamilton’s general issues committee approved the revised bylaw at its June 15 meeting.

Councillors approved the bylaw in early April to send a message to residents who fail to follow the province’s emergency orders. City officials said at the time that people continued to gather at the city’s many waterfalls, the escarpment stairs, and they had been playing soccer or basketball in groups of more than five at city parks. Other municipalities created their own physical distancing bylaws, including Burlington and Toronto.

Related Content

“All that is contrary to physical separation,” said Mayor Fred Eisenberger in April.

He called the bylaw an “unfortunate, but necessary circumstances” and that “we are going to be able to save lives” if residents follow these public health measures.

Eisenberger recently said the city wasn’t going to rescind the bylaw because the province and Hamilton was still under a state of emergency.

The bylaw imposed a set fine of $500 for infractions, including: failing to maintain a two-metre distance; property owners failing to provide physical distancing space; attending or using a city property that had been closed; and obstructing an officer or staff person.

Ken Leendertse, director of licensing, said city bylaw officers laid 170 charges under Ontario’s emergency orders, including having a business open when it should have been closed. Leendertse said the city had issued 26 tickets under the physical distancing bylaw.

A number of those tickets were issued to people who were gathering at the closed escarpment stairs, Albion Falls, and at a number of house parties where there was limited physical distancing.

“The last couple of weeks we haven’t laid any charges,” said Leendertse. “We seem to be seeing significant compliance in both the provincial and municipal bylaw.”

Leendertse told Ward 1 Coun. Maureen Wilson, who attended a Black Lives Matter rally at Hamilton City Hall June 12, that she could have been issued a fine if she was not physically distancing during the event. It was estimated hundreds of people stage protests at Gore Park and at Dundurn Park on June 13, which followed another large march through downtown Hamilton and ended up at city hall.

“If you were not physically distancing you could have been in violation of the bylaw,” said Leendertse.