Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre disrupted by COVID-19

News Jun 06, 2020 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

The Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre is under construction again, after a six-week delay caused by the province’s coronavirus pandemic essential service orders, but questions remain about the impact the delay will have on the project’s schedule and cost.

Jasmine Graham, senior communications officer for the City of Hamilton, said staff are “working” with Steelcore Construction Ltd. of Scarborough to “investigate opportunities for mitigating impacts to the schedule and budget.”

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson confirmed work was halted after the province paused all non-essential construction in early April due to the coronavirus pandemic. The Ancaster art centre project was identified by the city as a non-essential construction project.

The province shut down some parts of the construction industry in an effort to contain the coronavirus. Projects related to the health-care sector, or maintaining the operations of petrochemical plants and refineries, were exempted. In May, the province lifted essential workplace limits on construction as part of the first stage of Ontario’s reopening plan.

Ferguson said that “there was no significant change (in the schedule),” and expects the project to meet its goal of being essentially completed by the fall of 2021. “I drove past it and they were going full bore.”

Steelcore Construction Ltd., which won the tender for the project, has two large white containers with cement inside lined up in front of the former school located on Wilson Street, as workers and machines bustle about the property.

Demolition of the former Ancaster Memorial Elementary School began last November after a groundbreaking ceremony took place on the $22-million project.

Steelcore Construction Ltd.’s Joe Vala said in an earlier interview that the asbestos was to be removed from the structure. Plans include lifting the roof off the building, and the back wall of the former school will be moved to extend the structure’s footprint.

The centre will eventually have a 450-seat theatre and rooms for art, theatre, dance and storage. There will be a planned grand entrance to the centre from Wilson Street.

It is expected that construction will be completed, and a grand opening held, in the fall of 2021.

“Having the grand opening is more important now than ever,” said Bob Wilkins, the art centre’s chair of its fundraising campaign. “The community will need the arts centre, and it will provide a wonderful experience for people and the community.”

Wilkins said some of the businesses who have pledged funds for the centre have taken an economic hit due to the pandemic. He is gauging the pledges that are coming in from local businesses, but he isn’t worried at this point about meeting the final tally.

“I have had a few calls, but nothing to worry about,” he said.

The community fundraising campaign helped raise about $5 million, including a $1-million donation from Ancaster residents Michael and Carolyn Desnoyers for the rights to name the facility. The Desnoyers wanted the building’s name to remain the Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre.

The cost of the centre had jumped by about 20 per cent since when it was first conceived in 2012, forcing Ferguson to be creative in cobbling together the government financing for the project – tapping into federal gas tax money, dipping in reserve funds and selling off surplus city properties.

Meanwhile, a few other construction projects managed to be completed prior to the pandemic, including the $548,000 road rehabilitation on Book Road from Southcote to Glancaster. According to city records, the work had been scheduled to be completed by July 30. In addition, the contractor, Dufferin Construction, completed the installation of a pedestrian crossover at Kitty Murry Lane and Belfort Terrence, with an estimated cost of about $20,000.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: After many construction projects were paused by the COVID-19 pandemic, we wanted to find out how the Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre was impacted.

Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre project underway, with questions about schedule

#infrastructure

News Jun 06, 2020 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

The Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre is under construction again, after a six-week delay caused by the province’s coronavirus pandemic essential service orders, but questions remain about the impact the delay will have on the project’s schedule and cost.

Jasmine Graham, senior communications officer for the City of Hamilton, said staff are “working” with Steelcore Construction Ltd. of Scarborough to “investigate opportunities for mitigating impacts to the schedule and budget.”

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson confirmed work was halted after the province paused all non-essential construction in early April due to the coronavirus pandemic. The Ancaster art centre project was identified by the city as a non-essential construction project.

The province shut down some parts of the construction industry in an effort to contain the coronavirus. Projects related to the health-care sector, or maintaining the operations of petrochemical plants and refineries, were exempted. In May, the province lifted essential workplace limits on construction as part of the first stage of Ontario’s reopening plan.

Related Content

Ferguson said that “there was no significant change (in the schedule),” and expects the project to meet its goal of being essentially completed by the fall of 2021. “I drove past it and they were going full bore.”

Steelcore Construction Ltd., which won the tender for the project, has two large white containers with cement inside lined up in front of the former school located on Wilson Street, as workers and machines bustle about the property.

Demolition of the former Ancaster Memorial Elementary School began last November after a groundbreaking ceremony took place on the $22-million project.

Steelcore Construction Ltd.’s Joe Vala said in an earlier interview that the asbestos was to be removed from the structure. Plans include lifting the roof off the building, and the back wall of the former school will be moved to extend the structure’s footprint.

The centre will eventually have a 450-seat theatre and rooms for art, theatre, dance and storage. There will be a planned grand entrance to the centre from Wilson Street.

It is expected that construction will be completed, and a grand opening held, in the fall of 2021.

“Having the grand opening is more important now than ever,” said Bob Wilkins, the art centre’s chair of its fundraising campaign. “The community will need the arts centre, and it will provide a wonderful experience for people and the community.”

Wilkins said some of the businesses who have pledged funds for the centre have taken an economic hit due to the pandemic. He is gauging the pledges that are coming in from local businesses, but he isn’t worried at this point about meeting the final tally.

“I have had a few calls, but nothing to worry about,” he said.

The community fundraising campaign helped raise about $5 million, including a $1-million donation from Ancaster residents Michael and Carolyn Desnoyers for the rights to name the facility. The Desnoyers wanted the building’s name to remain the Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre.

The cost of the centre had jumped by about 20 per cent since when it was first conceived in 2012, forcing Ferguson to be creative in cobbling together the government financing for the project – tapping into federal gas tax money, dipping in reserve funds and selling off surplus city properties.

Meanwhile, a few other construction projects managed to be completed prior to the pandemic, including the $548,000 road rehabilitation on Book Road from Southcote to Glancaster. According to city records, the work had been scheduled to be completed by July 30. In addition, the contractor, Dufferin Construction, completed the installation of a pedestrian crossover at Kitty Murry Lane and Belfort Terrence, with an estimated cost of about $20,000.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: After many construction projects were paused by the COVID-19 pandemic, we wanted to find out how the Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre was impacted.

Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre project underway, with questions about schedule

#infrastructure

News Jun 06, 2020 by Kevin Werner Ancaster News

The Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre is under construction again, after a six-week delay caused by the province’s coronavirus pandemic essential service orders, but questions remain about the impact the delay will have on the project’s schedule and cost.

Jasmine Graham, senior communications officer for the City of Hamilton, said staff are “working” with Steelcore Construction Ltd. of Scarborough to “investigate opportunities for mitigating impacts to the schedule and budget.”

Ancaster Coun. Lloyd Ferguson confirmed work was halted after the province paused all non-essential construction in early April due to the coronavirus pandemic. The Ancaster art centre project was identified by the city as a non-essential construction project.

The province shut down some parts of the construction industry in an effort to contain the coronavirus. Projects related to the health-care sector, or maintaining the operations of petrochemical plants and refineries, were exempted. In May, the province lifted essential workplace limits on construction as part of the first stage of Ontario’s reopening plan.

Related Content

Ferguson said that “there was no significant change (in the schedule),” and expects the project to meet its goal of being essentially completed by the fall of 2021. “I drove past it and they were going full bore.”

Steelcore Construction Ltd., which won the tender for the project, has two large white containers with cement inside lined up in front of the former school located on Wilson Street, as workers and machines bustle about the property.

Demolition of the former Ancaster Memorial Elementary School began last November after a groundbreaking ceremony took place on the $22-million project.

Steelcore Construction Ltd.’s Joe Vala said in an earlier interview that the asbestos was to be removed from the structure. Plans include lifting the roof off the building, and the back wall of the former school will be moved to extend the structure’s footprint.

The centre will eventually have a 450-seat theatre and rooms for art, theatre, dance and storage. There will be a planned grand entrance to the centre from Wilson Street.

It is expected that construction will be completed, and a grand opening held, in the fall of 2021.

“Having the grand opening is more important now than ever,” said Bob Wilkins, the art centre’s chair of its fundraising campaign. “The community will need the arts centre, and it will provide a wonderful experience for people and the community.”

Wilkins said some of the businesses who have pledged funds for the centre have taken an economic hit due to the pandemic. He is gauging the pledges that are coming in from local businesses, but he isn’t worried at this point about meeting the final tally.

“I have had a few calls, but nothing to worry about,” he said.

The community fundraising campaign helped raise about $5 million, including a $1-million donation from Ancaster residents Michael and Carolyn Desnoyers for the rights to name the facility. The Desnoyers wanted the building’s name to remain the Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre.

The cost of the centre had jumped by about 20 per cent since when it was first conceived in 2012, forcing Ferguson to be creative in cobbling together the government financing for the project – tapping into federal gas tax money, dipping in reserve funds and selling off surplus city properties.

Meanwhile, a few other construction projects managed to be completed prior to the pandemic, including the $548,000 road rehabilitation on Book Road from Southcote to Glancaster. According to city records, the work had been scheduled to be completed by July 30. In addition, the contractor, Dufferin Construction, completed the installation of a pedestrian crossover at Kitty Murry Lane and Belfort Terrence, with an estimated cost of about $20,000.


STORY BEHIND THE STORY: After many construction projects were paused by the COVID-19 pandemic, we wanted to find out how the Ancaster Memorial Arts Centre was impacted.