“I felt like a shell of a human': Waterdown woman had COVID-19 for 61 days

News Jun 05, 2020 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

For 61 days Doriana Homerski had COVID-19.

And for two months of that time, the 26-year-old Waterdown woman was confined to her bed.

“It was awful - it took everything out of me,” she said. “I felt like a shell of a human.”

Homerski had travelled to Europe in early March and after she returned, she was living her life as normal - returning to work in a transitional home for people recovering from brain injury and stroke - and visiting her grandmother. But shortly thereafter, she began to feel symptoms of the novel coronavirus.

Originally, Homerski thought it was just a sinus infection because she had lost her sense of smell and taste and had a bad headache. But when her doctor found out she had travelled and worked in healthcare, she was tested for the novel coronavirus.

It took 10 days for the test results to come back as positive - and during that time her condition deteriorated greatly.

“Physically, I couldn’t even move,” she said. “I’d sleep for 20 hours a day - it was just awful.

“By the time I got my results back I was not even a human.”

Homerski said she ended up having symptoms of the virus for 45 days - and even after she stopped having symptoms her test results still came back as positive.

“Forty-eight days in I still tested positive for it,” she said. “My negative test didn’t come back until Day 61.”

For 35 days, she had severe symptoms - including a migraine-level headache that would not go away - and lingering symptoms for a further 10 days.

Homerski, who lives with her parents, mostly stayed in her room for the duration of her illness. Her parents took all the precautions they could while bringing her food, and sanitized any surfaces that she touched outside of her room.

Even now, Homerski said, because she was bedridden for two months it has been very difficult to bounce back.

“I’ve been struggling really hard with it,” she said. “It’s been mentally hard too, being in isolation for so long.”

One of the things that weighed heavily on her was that she visited her grandmother just after she returned from Europe.

“Every day I would wake up in fear … that I could have given it to my grandmother and it could potentially harm her so much more than me - it could potentially kill her,” she said. “That scared the hell out of me - it was just an awful feeling knowing I could have potentially given it to her or my parents.

“It’s just not something that you want to go through - thinking that you potentially harm people that you love.”

Homerski said health professionals are confused about why she had the disease for so long, as she is young and was a healthy person prior to the diagnosis.

“I was a young healthy person and it affected me so badly - I can’t imagine how it affects people who are more vulnerable,” she said. “I would not wish this virus upon anyone - it has taken everything from me - I don’t feel like myself.

“The person I was two and a half months ago is completely different from what I am now,” the former university soccer player continued. “I’m hoping that I can bounce back soon, but it’s going to be a really slow process.”

Homerski, who finally received a negative test result on May 28, said she still has not returned to work and continues to have a lot of weakness and fatigue.

“I’m still struggling every day to get stronger,” she said. “I’m still struggling to walk even a block, without feeling like I’ve run a marathon.”

She said it is frustrating to see people not taking guidelines around physical distancing and group gatherings seriously, knowing first-hand how serious the virus can be.

“It frustrates me, seeing people out living their lives,” she said. “Thinking that just because it’s nice out they can live their lives normally.

“I want to make sure people know how much it has affected me and how much it could affect people more vulnerable - it’s terrible.”

“I felt like a shell of a human': Waterdown woman had COVID-19 for 61 days

Doriana Homerski, 26, bedridden for two months with virus

News Jun 05, 2020 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

For 61 days Doriana Homerski had COVID-19.

And for two months of that time, the 26-year-old Waterdown woman was confined to her bed.

“It was awful - it took everything out of me,” she said. “I felt like a shell of a human.”

Homerski had travelled to Europe in early March and after she returned, she was living her life as normal - returning to work in a transitional home for people recovering from brain injury and stroke - and visiting her grandmother. But shortly thereafter, she began to feel symptoms of the novel coronavirus.

Related Content

Originally, Homerski thought it was just a sinus infection because she had lost her sense of smell and taste and had a bad headache. But when her doctor found out she had travelled and worked in healthcare, she was tested for the novel coronavirus.

It took 10 days for the test results to come back as positive - and during that time her condition deteriorated greatly.

“Physically, I couldn’t even move,” she said. “I’d sleep for 20 hours a day - it was just awful.

“By the time I got my results back I was not even a human.”

Homerski said she ended up having symptoms of the virus for 45 days - and even after she stopped having symptoms her test results still came back as positive.

“Forty-eight days in I still tested positive for it,” she said. “My negative test didn’t come back until Day 61.”

For 35 days, she had severe symptoms - including a migraine-level headache that would not go away - and lingering symptoms for a further 10 days.

Homerski, who lives with her parents, mostly stayed in her room for the duration of her illness. Her parents took all the precautions they could while bringing her food, and sanitized any surfaces that she touched outside of her room.

Even now, Homerski said, because she was bedridden for two months it has been very difficult to bounce back.

“I’ve been struggling really hard with it,” she said. “It’s been mentally hard too, being in isolation for so long.”

One of the things that weighed heavily on her was that she visited her grandmother just after she returned from Europe.

“Every day I would wake up in fear … that I could have given it to my grandmother and it could potentially harm her so much more than me - it could potentially kill her,” she said. “That scared the hell out of me - it was just an awful feeling knowing I could have potentially given it to her or my parents.

“It’s just not something that you want to go through - thinking that you potentially harm people that you love.”

Homerski said health professionals are confused about why she had the disease for so long, as she is young and was a healthy person prior to the diagnosis.

“I was a young healthy person and it affected me so badly - I can’t imagine how it affects people who are more vulnerable,” she said. “I would not wish this virus upon anyone - it has taken everything from me - I don’t feel like myself.

“The person I was two and a half months ago is completely different from what I am now,” the former university soccer player continued. “I’m hoping that I can bounce back soon, but it’s going to be a really slow process.”

Homerski, who finally received a negative test result on May 28, said she still has not returned to work and continues to have a lot of weakness and fatigue.

“I’m still struggling every day to get stronger,” she said. “I’m still struggling to walk even a block, without feeling like I’ve run a marathon.”

She said it is frustrating to see people not taking guidelines around physical distancing and group gatherings seriously, knowing first-hand how serious the virus can be.

“It frustrates me, seeing people out living their lives,” she said. “Thinking that just because it’s nice out they can live their lives normally.

“I want to make sure people know how much it has affected me and how much it could affect people more vulnerable - it’s terrible.”

“I felt like a shell of a human': Waterdown woman had COVID-19 for 61 days

Doriana Homerski, 26, bedridden for two months with virus

News Jun 05, 2020 by Mac Christie Flamborough Review

For 61 days Doriana Homerski had COVID-19.

And for two months of that time, the 26-year-old Waterdown woman was confined to her bed.

“It was awful - it took everything out of me,” she said. “I felt like a shell of a human.”

Homerski had travelled to Europe in early March and after she returned, she was living her life as normal - returning to work in a transitional home for people recovering from brain injury and stroke - and visiting her grandmother. But shortly thereafter, she began to feel symptoms of the novel coronavirus.

Related Content

Originally, Homerski thought it was just a sinus infection because she had lost her sense of smell and taste and had a bad headache. But when her doctor found out she had travelled and worked in healthcare, she was tested for the novel coronavirus.

It took 10 days for the test results to come back as positive - and during that time her condition deteriorated greatly.

“Physically, I couldn’t even move,” she said. “I’d sleep for 20 hours a day - it was just awful.

“By the time I got my results back I was not even a human.”

Homerski said she ended up having symptoms of the virus for 45 days - and even after she stopped having symptoms her test results still came back as positive.

“Forty-eight days in I still tested positive for it,” she said. “My negative test didn’t come back until Day 61.”

For 35 days, she had severe symptoms - including a migraine-level headache that would not go away - and lingering symptoms for a further 10 days.

Homerski, who lives with her parents, mostly stayed in her room for the duration of her illness. Her parents took all the precautions they could while bringing her food, and sanitized any surfaces that she touched outside of her room.

Even now, Homerski said, because she was bedridden for two months it has been very difficult to bounce back.

“I’ve been struggling really hard with it,” she said. “It’s been mentally hard too, being in isolation for so long.”

One of the things that weighed heavily on her was that she visited her grandmother just after she returned from Europe.

“Every day I would wake up in fear … that I could have given it to my grandmother and it could potentially harm her so much more than me - it could potentially kill her,” she said. “That scared the hell out of me - it was just an awful feeling knowing I could have potentially given it to her or my parents.

“It’s just not something that you want to go through - thinking that you potentially harm people that you love.”

Homerski said health professionals are confused about why she had the disease for so long, as she is young and was a healthy person prior to the diagnosis.

“I was a young healthy person and it affected me so badly - I can’t imagine how it affects people who are more vulnerable,” she said. “I would not wish this virus upon anyone - it has taken everything from me - I don’t feel like myself.

“The person I was two and a half months ago is completely different from what I am now,” the former university soccer player continued. “I’m hoping that I can bounce back soon, but it’s going to be a really slow process.”

Homerski, who finally received a negative test result on May 28, said she still has not returned to work and continues to have a lot of weakness and fatigue.

“I’m still struggling every day to get stronger,” she said. “I’m still struggling to walk even a block, without feeling like I’ve run a marathon.”

She said it is frustrating to see people not taking guidelines around physical distancing and group gatherings seriously, knowing first-hand how serious the virus can be.

“It frustrates me, seeing people out living their lives,” she said. “Thinking that just because it’s nice out they can live their lives normally.

“I want to make sure people know how much it has affected me and how much it could affect people more vulnerable - it’s terrible.”