A new health maxim

Living Nov 15, 2014 by Amy Kenny Hamilton Spectator

Naturopathy was an epiphany for Andrea Maxim.

In the early 2000s, she was a student at McMaster University, working toward a degree in biology and pharmacology, with dreams of going to med school.

When she started researching acupuncture, massage therapy and naturopathy, she found herself drawn to the idea of natural rather than traditional medicine.

This summer Maxim, who now runs naturopathic clinics in Burlington and Caledonia, released MAXIMized Health — a book detailing her system for achieving optimal health (Black Card Books, $34, themaximmovement.com).

"(The target audience is) women 35 to 65 who are already trying to engage with healthier choices but they're just not sure what the best way or best plan of attack is," Maxim says of the book, which is written in a conversational tone aimed at making readers feel like she's right there with them. It helps that each book purchase comes with a free 30-minute consult, either in-person, over the phone or via Skype.

In her practice, Maxim says many of her clients come to her describing digestive upset, cramping, bloating and pain — symptoms they tend to normalize without considering there might be a root cause they can focus on in order to eliminate those discomforts (Maxim herself was painfully sensitive to gluten until she changed her diet).

She says there's a common misconception that naturopathy means spending a lot of money on expensive vitamins. Rather, she says, it's about making a lifestyle change. Because of that, it's not an overnight fix, but Maxim says if you're willing to take responsibility for where you are in your health and where you want to be moving forward, it's achievable.

Her book aims to assist by outlining detoxification strategies, sample meal plans and fitness options. It also offers relaxation exercises, stress management techniques and additional day-to-day changes people can implement.

akenny@thespec.com

905-526-2487 | @Amyatthespec

A new health maxim

Living Nov 15, 2014 by Amy Kenny Hamilton Spectator

Naturopathy was an epiphany for Andrea Maxim.

In the early 2000s, she was a student at McMaster University, working toward a degree in biology and pharmacology, with dreams of going to med school.

When she started researching acupuncture, massage therapy and naturopathy, she found herself drawn to the idea of natural rather than traditional medicine.

This summer Maxim, who now runs naturopathic clinics in Burlington and Caledonia, released MAXIMized Health — a book detailing her system for achieving optimal health (Black Card Books, $34, themaximmovement.com).

"(The target audience is) women 35 to 65 who are already trying to engage with healthier choices but they're just not sure what the best way or best plan of attack is," Maxim says of the book, which is written in a conversational tone aimed at making readers feel like she's right there with them. It helps that each book purchase comes with a free 30-minute consult, either in-person, over the phone or via Skype.

In her practice, Maxim says many of her clients come to her describing digestive upset, cramping, bloating and pain — symptoms they tend to normalize without considering there might be a root cause they can focus on in order to eliminate those discomforts (Maxim herself was painfully sensitive to gluten until she changed her diet).

She says there's a common misconception that naturopathy means spending a lot of money on expensive vitamins. Rather, she says, it's about making a lifestyle change. Because of that, it's not an overnight fix, but Maxim says if you're willing to take responsibility for where you are in your health and where you want to be moving forward, it's achievable.

Her book aims to assist by outlining detoxification strategies, sample meal plans and fitness options. It also offers relaxation exercises, stress management techniques and additional day-to-day changes people can implement.

akenny@thespec.com

905-526-2487 | @Amyatthespec

A new health maxim

Living Nov 15, 2014 by Amy Kenny Hamilton Spectator

Naturopathy was an epiphany for Andrea Maxim.

In the early 2000s, she was a student at McMaster University, working toward a degree in biology and pharmacology, with dreams of going to med school.

When she started researching acupuncture, massage therapy and naturopathy, she found herself drawn to the idea of natural rather than traditional medicine.

This summer Maxim, who now runs naturopathic clinics in Burlington and Caledonia, released MAXIMized Health — a book detailing her system for achieving optimal health (Black Card Books, $34, themaximmovement.com).

"(The target audience is) women 35 to 65 who are already trying to engage with healthier choices but they're just not sure what the best way or best plan of attack is," Maxim says of the book, which is written in a conversational tone aimed at making readers feel like she's right there with them. It helps that each book purchase comes with a free 30-minute consult, either in-person, over the phone or via Skype.

In her practice, Maxim says many of her clients come to her describing digestive upset, cramping, bloating and pain — symptoms they tend to normalize without considering there might be a root cause they can focus on in order to eliminate those discomforts (Maxim herself was painfully sensitive to gluten until she changed her diet).

She says there's a common misconception that naturopathy means spending a lot of money on expensive vitamins. Rather, she says, it's about making a lifestyle change. Because of that, it's not an overnight fix, but Maxim says if you're willing to take responsibility for where you are in your health and where you want to be moving forward, it's achievable.

Her book aims to assist by outlining detoxification strategies, sample meal plans and fitness options. It also offers relaxation exercises, stress management techniques and additional day-to-day changes people can implement.

akenny@thespec.com

905-526-2487 | @Amyatthespec