Cancer Assistance Program changes service model

Community Apr 06, 2020 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Their doors may be closed but the Cancer Assistance Program is still helping cancer patients in Hamilton.

“This week we are going to launch a new drive-to-deliver program,” said CAP executive director Debbie Logel Butler.

Eight volunteers split into two teams and working from home will be calling, on Mondays and Tuesdays, Cancer Assistance Program registered clients to see how they are managing and to offer them incontinence products and nutritional supplements along with food for those clients who are unable to get to a grocery store and have no one to go shopping for them.

Logel Butler said some cancer patients are being discharged to make room for victims of the coronavirus pandemic.

The names of clients who request support will be forwarded to CAP staff members (they have six staff, all but one are working from home) who will organize packages of incontinence products and nutritional supplements for a back door pick-up later in the week at their Concession Street office by 15 volunteer drivers.

“There’s no human contact,” said Logel Butler, who noted the drivers are having the items loaded into the trunk of their cars.

None of their drivers have reported coronavirus-like symptoms Logel Butler said.

The drivers, who have all been issued protective masks and gloves, would normally be taking cancer patients to their medical appointments, but that free service was suspended, when the CAP office was closed to the public on March 16.

After picking up the items at the office, the drivers will head out to Zarky’s Fine Foods on Hempstead Drive to pick up a food bag for those clients who are unable to get to the store for food.

Sara Griffin looks after quality control and marketing at Zarky’s.

“We have a relationship with CAP,” she said, adding they will be providing food bags that contain five prepared dinners, two soups, fresh bread and some fresh fruit at a “modest cost.”

All the prepared food is made at their Hempstead Drive kitchen.

Griffin said they don’t know how much food CAP will be ordering this week since this is week one of the program

“We’re going to make it happen, whatever they need,” Griffin said.

More than a 100 people are working at Zarky’s.

Griffin said they are all wearing face shields and gloves and practicing physical distancing.

After picking up the food via curbside service, the drivers will then deliver the packages to CAP clients either leaving them on the doorstep or buzzing apartment dwellers to come down and get their package.

Last year over 3,000 six-packs of nutritional supplements and almost 2,800 packages of incontinence products were provided for free.

Prior to closing last month, Logel Butler noted an average of 25 cancer clients a day came into their office for service and that number does not include clients who they were supporting each day with drives to their cancer-related appointments.

Logel Butler said the program continues to loan equipment but only through hospital and community therapists rather than an individual visiting the office.

But that is now being done through hospital community therapists rather than a visit to the CAP office.

Logel Butler said they have loaned out 73 pieces of equipment since March 16.

In addition, the program is offering increased free parking spots for cancer patients who have appointments at the nearby Juravinski Hospital and Cancer Centre at their office parking lot located at 555 Concession St.

The pandemic could also hit the charity hard in the pocketbook.

Logel Butler noted they are able to launch this new drive-to-deliver program thanks to a $5,000 gift from a Hamilton couple (who do not wish to be named) but will need more community support to continue provide this new program due the pandemic.

CAP does not receive any government support Logel Butler noted and their traditional fundraisers like the May CARE walk have been cancelled due to the pandemic.

They are looking at holding a virtual CARE walk.

Logel Butler said the public can make an online donation via: cancerassist.ca.

“It’s a stressful time for charities,” Logel Butler said. “We’re okay right now, but we’re monitoring everything very closely.”

Hamilton's Cancer Assistance Program changes service model

Pandemic closes office, but some volunteers still helping

Community Apr 06, 2020 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Their doors may be closed but the Cancer Assistance Program is still helping cancer patients in Hamilton.

“This week we are going to launch a new drive-to-deliver program,” said CAP executive director Debbie Logel Butler.

Eight volunteers split into two teams and working from home will be calling, on Mondays and Tuesdays, Cancer Assistance Program registered clients to see how they are managing and to offer them incontinence products and nutritional supplements along with food for those clients who are unable to get to a grocery store and have no one to go shopping for them.

Logel Butler said some cancer patients are being discharged to make room for victims of the coronavirus pandemic.

Related Content

The names of clients who request support will be forwarded to CAP staff members (they have six staff, all but one are working from home) who will organize packages of incontinence products and nutritional supplements for a back door pick-up later in the week at their Concession Street office by 15 volunteer drivers.

“There’s no human contact,” said Logel Butler, who noted the drivers are having the items loaded into the trunk of their cars.

None of their drivers have reported coronavirus-like symptoms Logel Butler said.

The drivers, who have all been issued protective masks and gloves, would normally be taking cancer patients to their medical appointments, but that free service was suspended, when the CAP office was closed to the public on March 16.

After picking up the items at the office, the drivers will head out to Zarky’s Fine Foods on Hempstead Drive to pick up a food bag for those clients who are unable to get to the store for food.

Sara Griffin looks after quality control and marketing at Zarky’s.

“We have a relationship with CAP,” she said, adding they will be providing food bags that contain five prepared dinners, two soups, fresh bread and some fresh fruit at a “modest cost.”

All the prepared food is made at their Hempstead Drive kitchen.

Griffin said they don’t know how much food CAP will be ordering this week since this is week one of the program

“We’re going to make it happen, whatever they need,” Griffin said.

More than a 100 people are working at Zarky’s.

Griffin said they are all wearing face shields and gloves and practicing physical distancing.

After picking up the food via curbside service, the drivers will then deliver the packages to CAP clients either leaving them on the doorstep or buzzing apartment dwellers to come down and get their package.

Last year over 3,000 six-packs of nutritional supplements and almost 2,800 packages of incontinence products were provided for free.

Prior to closing last month, Logel Butler noted an average of 25 cancer clients a day came into their office for service and that number does not include clients who they were supporting each day with drives to their cancer-related appointments.

Logel Butler said the program continues to loan equipment but only through hospital and community therapists rather than an individual visiting the office.

But that is now being done through hospital community therapists rather than a visit to the CAP office.

Logel Butler said they have loaned out 73 pieces of equipment since March 16.

In addition, the program is offering increased free parking spots for cancer patients who have appointments at the nearby Juravinski Hospital and Cancer Centre at their office parking lot located at 555 Concession St.

The pandemic could also hit the charity hard in the pocketbook.

Logel Butler noted they are able to launch this new drive-to-deliver program thanks to a $5,000 gift from a Hamilton couple (who do not wish to be named) but will need more community support to continue provide this new program due the pandemic.

CAP does not receive any government support Logel Butler noted and their traditional fundraisers like the May CARE walk have been cancelled due to the pandemic.

They are looking at holding a virtual CARE walk.

Logel Butler said the public can make an online donation via: cancerassist.ca.

“It’s a stressful time for charities,” Logel Butler said. “We’re okay right now, but we’re monitoring everything very closely.”

Hamilton's Cancer Assistance Program changes service model

Pandemic closes office, but some volunteers still helping

Community Apr 06, 2020 by Mark Newman Hamilton Mountain News

Their doors may be closed but the Cancer Assistance Program is still helping cancer patients in Hamilton.

“This week we are going to launch a new drive-to-deliver program,” said CAP executive director Debbie Logel Butler.

Eight volunteers split into two teams and working from home will be calling, on Mondays and Tuesdays, Cancer Assistance Program registered clients to see how they are managing and to offer them incontinence products and nutritional supplements along with food for those clients who are unable to get to a grocery store and have no one to go shopping for them.

Logel Butler said some cancer patients are being discharged to make room for victims of the coronavirus pandemic.

Related Content

The names of clients who request support will be forwarded to CAP staff members (they have six staff, all but one are working from home) who will organize packages of incontinence products and nutritional supplements for a back door pick-up later in the week at their Concession Street office by 15 volunteer drivers.

“There’s no human contact,” said Logel Butler, who noted the drivers are having the items loaded into the trunk of their cars.

None of their drivers have reported coronavirus-like symptoms Logel Butler said.

The drivers, who have all been issued protective masks and gloves, would normally be taking cancer patients to their medical appointments, but that free service was suspended, when the CAP office was closed to the public on March 16.

After picking up the items at the office, the drivers will head out to Zarky’s Fine Foods on Hempstead Drive to pick up a food bag for those clients who are unable to get to the store for food.

Sara Griffin looks after quality control and marketing at Zarky’s.

“We have a relationship with CAP,” she said, adding they will be providing food bags that contain five prepared dinners, two soups, fresh bread and some fresh fruit at a “modest cost.”

All the prepared food is made at their Hempstead Drive kitchen.

Griffin said they don’t know how much food CAP will be ordering this week since this is week one of the program

“We’re going to make it happen, whatever they need,” Griffin said.

More than a 100 people are working at Zarky’s.

Griffin said they are all wearing face shields and gloves and practicing physical distancing.

After picking up the food via curbside service, the drivers will then deliver the packages to CAP clients either leaving them on the doorstep or buzzing apartment dwellers to come down and get their package.

Last year over 3,000 six-packs of nutritional supplements and almost 2,800 packages of incontinence products were provided for free.

Prior to closing last month, Logel Butler noted an average of 25 cancer clients a day came into their office for service and that number does not include clients who they were supporting each day with drives to their cancer-related appointments.

Logel Butler said the program continues to loan equipment but only through hospital and community therapists rather than an individual visiting the office.

But that is now being done through hospital community therapists rather than a visit to the CAP office.

Logel Butler said they have loaned out 73 pieces of equipment since March 16.

In addition, the program is offering increased free parking spots for cancer patients who have appointments at the nearby Juravinski Hospital and Cancer Centre at their office parking lot located at 555 Concession St.

The pandemic could also hit the charity hard in the pocketbook.

Logel Butler noted they are able to launch this new drive-to-deliver program thanks to a $5,000 gift from a Hamilton couple (who do not wish to be named) but will need more community support to continue provide this new program due the pandemic.

CAP does not receive any government support Logel Butler noted and their traditional fundraisers like the May CARE walk have been cancelled due to the pandemic.

They are looking at holding a virtual CARE walk.

Logel Butler said the public can make an online donation via: cancerassist.ca.

“It’s a stressful time for charities,” Logel Butler said. “We’re okay right now, but we’re monitoring everything very closely.”